Catalogue


Rivers and the power of ancient Rome /
Brian Campbell.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.
description
xvi, 585 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0807834807 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807834800 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.
isbn
0807834807 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807834800 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Rivers Past and Present -- Putting Rivers on the Map -- Rivers, Lands, and Laws -- Rivers in Literature, Religion, and Art -- Rivers, Armies, Fleets, and Frontiers -- Exploiting Rivers -- Movement of Goods by River (1) : Spain, Gaul, the Rhine, and Britain -- Movement of Goods by River (2) : The Danube, Italy, and the East -- Healing Waters : Rivers, Springs, Relaxation, and Health -- Rome in Control of the Waters -- Appendix 1: Spas in the Roman World -- Appendix 2: Navigable Rivers according to Ancient Authors.
catalogue key
8534510
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [507]-566) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Examining artistic representations of rivers, related architecture, and the work of ancient geographers and topographers, as well as writers who describe rivers, Campbell explores the role and influence of rivers and their surrounding landscape on the society and culture of the Roman Empire.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-02-01:
One of the few constants in history is the fact that transport by water is always cheaper than by land. Hence the importance of rivers for economic and political development, notably for Rome. Campbell (Queen's Univ. of Belfast, Ireland), author of the splendid edition about the Roman agrimensores--Writings of the Roman Land Surveyors (2000)--here presents a study of rivers in the society of imperial Rome. He touches on beliefs, myths, and iconography, but the emphasis is on three aspects: writings of the ancient geographers (especially Strabo, Pliny the Elder, Pausanias) and voyages (peripli) and itineraries; rivers in military and naval operations, especially in connection with frontier policy; and control of rivers for benefit of the population, particularly through commerce, aqueducts, and spas. Throughout, the emphasis is on analysis, reflecting the shift from description that has shaped the discipline of geography since 1980. What was once the standard work in the field, Max Cary's descriptive The Geographic Background of Greek and Roman History (1949), is not even included in Campbell's bibliography. As part of an introduction to graduate study of the Roman Empire, the work has great value, enhanced by excellent maps and diagrams, learned notes, and a judicious bibliography. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, faculty. R. I. Frank emeritus, University of California, Irvine
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A welcome, useful, and significant contribution that provides a solid foundation for future studies." - American Historical Review
"Campbell has gathered and analyzed an impressive battery of ancient comments and reflections on rivers." - Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"Extensively researched, well put together, and highly readable, Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome is important for anyone interested in Roman history and society." - The NYMAS Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Figuring in myth, religion, law, the military, commerce, and transportation, rivers were at the heart of Rome's increasing exploitation of the environment of the Mediterranean world. In Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome , Brian Campbell explores the role and influence of rivers and their surrounding landscape on the society and culture of the Roman Empire. Examining artistic representations of rivers, related architecture, and the work of ancient geographers and topographers, as well as writers who describe rivers, Campbell reveals how Romans defined the geographical areas they conquered and how geography and natural surroundings related to their society and activities. In addition, he illuminates the prominence and value of rivers in the control and expansion of the Roman Empire--through the legal regulation of riverine activities, the exploitation of rivers in military tactics, and the use of rivers as routes of communication and movement. Campbell shows how a technological understanding of--and even mastery over--the forces of the river helped Rome rise to its central place in the ancient world.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xiii
Rivers Past and Presentp. 1
The Hydrological Cycle and River Dynamicsp. 4
Changes in the Riverine Environmentp. 9
The Watery Origins of Romep. 13
The Geographical Settingp. 22
Problems and Approachesp. 30
Putting Rivers on the Mapp. 45
Geographical Writingp. 46
Space, Measurement, and Locationp. 53
Demarcating Provincial Boundariesp. 62
Riverine Identity and Cultural Affinityp. 64
Geographical Descriptionsp. 70
Creating Mapsp. 78
Conclusion: "The boon of a water supply"p. 81
Rivers, Lands, and Lawsp. 83
Definitionsp. 86
The Res Publica and Water Rightsp. 90
Boundariesp. 98
Managing Disruptionp. 100
Alluvial Activity and River Islandsp. 109
Conclusion: Managing Rivers for the Communityp. 116
Rivers in Literature, Religion, and Artp. 118
The Hydrological Cycle and Human Lifep. 120
The Riverine Environmentp. 122
Status, Character, and Identityp. 126
Divine Rivers and Springsp. 128
The Tiberp. 140
Riverine Legendsp. 143
Artp. 150
Conclusion: "A steady column of sweet fluid"p. 159
Rivers, Armies, Fleets, and Frontiersp. 160
Military Tacticsp. 161
Settlements and Military Basesp. 167
Military Supplyp. 177
River Fleets of the Imperial Periodp. 180
Frontiersp. 186
Conclusion: Rivers in the Service of Romep. 197
Exploiting Riversp. 200
Navigable Rivers: Characteristics and Problemsp. 201
Ancient Writing on Navigable Riversp. 203
Riverboatsp. 208
Road and River Transportp. 215
Rivers, Roads, and Bridgesp. 218
Regulating the Flow: Canals and Damsp. 219
The Riverine Environment: Water Mills, Irrigation, Drainage, and Wetlandsp. 229
Aqueductsp. 235
Rome and the Distribution of Waterp. 239
Conclusion: "A most gentle trader in all the earth's produce"p. 244
Movement of Goods by River (1): Spain, Gaul, the Rhine, and Britainp. 246
The Spanish Provincesp. 247
The Gallic Provincesp. 263
Along the Rhinep. 279
Britainp. 289
Movement of Goods by River (2): The Danube, Italy, and the Eastp. 291
The Danube and Its Environsp. 291
Italy: Arnus, Liris, Volturnusp. 300
Italy: The Padus and Cisalpinap. 302
Italy: The Tiber Valleyp. 309
The Eastern Provincesp. 320
Conclusion: River Connectionsp. 328
Healing Waters: Rivers, Springs, Relaxation, and Healthp. 330
Relaxing Watersp. 331
Boating, Swimming, and Fishingp. 332
Healing Waters and Aelius Aristidesp. 337
Healing Waters: Vitruvius, Pliny, and Pausaniasp. 338
Healing Waters: The Medical Viewp. 343
Healing Waters: The Popular Viewp. 344
Spas (Aquae): The Evidencep. 347
Types of Treatmentp. 351
Spas, Routes, and Itinerariesp. 355
Fashionable Spa Resortsp. 359
Management of Spasp. 366
Conclusion: "As long as a man is at the waters he is never dead"p. 367
Rome in Control of the Watersp. 369
Rivers as Symbols: Conquestp. 370
Rivers as Symbols: Cooperationp. 379
Reversal of Fortunep. 383
Epilogue: "The Romans always win"p. 385
Abbreviationsp. 389
Spas in the Roman Worldp. 393
Navigable Rivers according to Ancient Authorsp. 405
Notesp. 411
Bibliographyp. 507
Index of Personsp. 559
Index of Placesp. 567
General Indexp. 581
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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