Catalogue


Should the United States privatize Social Security? [electronic resource] /
Henry J. Aaron and John B. Shoven ; edited and with an introduction by Benjamin M. Friedman.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c1999.
description
xii, 178 p. : ill.
ISBN
0262011743 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c1999.
isbn
0262011743 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
"The Alvin Hansen Symposium on Public Policy, Harvard University."
Papers and discussion from the Second Alvin Hansen Symposium held on April 27, 1998.
catalogue key
8524701
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Henry J. Aaron is Bruce and Virginia MacLaury Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. John B. Shoven is Charles R. Schwab Professor of Economics and Vernon and Lysbeth Anderson Dean of Humanities and Science at Stanford University. Benjamin M. Friedman is William Joseph Maier Professor of Economics at Harvard University.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Here's the deal. Spend a few hours with this book, and Aaron, Shoven and the others will bring you up-to-date on the most important social policy debate now going in America. Not only that, you'll enjoy the read." - Alan S. Blinder , Department of Economics, Princeton University
"Here's the deal. Spend a few hours with this book, and Aaron, Shoven and the others will bring you up-to-date on the most important social policy debate now going in America. Not only that, you'll enjoy the read." -Alan S. Blinder, Department of Economics, Princeton University
"Here's the deal. Spend a few hours with this book, and Aaron, Shovenand the others will bring you up-to-date on the most important socialpolicy debate now going in America. Not only that, you'll enjoy theread." Alan S. Blinder , Department of Economics, Princeton University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Aaron and Shoven debate the advantages and disadvantages of privatising the social security system in the United States. Included are responses by a number of leading economists to the ideas and arguments set forth by the authors.
Main Description
-- Alan S. Blinder, Department of Economics, Princeton University
Main Description
The two papers that make up the core of this book address what is perhaps the most fundamental question in the current debate over Social Security: whether to shift, in part or even entirely, from today's pay-as-you-go system to one that is not just funded but also privatized in the sense that individuals would retain control over the investment of their funds and, therefore, personally bear the associated risk. John Shoven argues yes, Henry Aaron no. Theoretical issues such as the likely effects on saving behavior and capital formation figure importantly in this discussion. But so do a broad array of practical considerations such as the expense of fund management and accounting, questions about how the public would regard the fairness of any new system, and the impact of recent developments in the federal budget and the U.S. stock market. The book also includes responses to both papers by four prominent economists-Robert J. Barro and David M. Cutler, of Harvard University; Alicia H. Munnell, of Boston Colle≥ and James Tobin, of Yale University-as well as Henry Aaron's and John Shoven's replies. The introductory remarks are by Benjamin M. Friedman.
Main Description
The two papers that make up the core of this book address what is perhaps the most fundamental question in the current debate over Social Security: whether to shift, in part or even entirely, from today's pay-as-you-go system to one that is not just funded but also privatized in the sense that individuals would retain control over the investment of their funds and, therefore, personally bear the associated risk. John Shoven argues yes, Henry Aaron no. Theoretical issues such as the likely effects on saving behavior and capital formation figure importantly in this discussion. But so do a broad array of practical considerations such as the expense of fund management and accounting, questions about how the public would regard the fairness of any new system, and the impact of recent developments in the federal budget and the U.S. stock market.The book also includes responses to both papers by four prominent economists--Robert J. Barro and David M. Cutler, of Harvard University; Alicia H. Munnell, of Boston College; and James Tobin, of Yale University--as well as Henry Aaron's and John Shoven's replies. The introductory remarks are by Benjamin M. Friedman.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. vii
Social Security Reform: Two Tiers Are Better Than Onep. 1
Social Security: Tune It Up, Don't Trade It Inp. 55
Commentsp. 113
Responsesp. 155
Rejoinderp. 169
Contributorsp. 171
Indexp. 173
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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