Catalogue


Parenting in England, 1760-1830 [electronic resource] : emotion, identity, and generation /
by Joanne Bailey.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xiii, 277 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199565198 (hbk.), 9780199565191 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199565198 (hbk.)
9780199565191 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8517738
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [255]-274) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-01-01:
The relationship between parents and children in Georgian England (1760-1830) is the subject of historian Bailey's analysis, which reveals the evolution of the parent's role as a reflection of cultural changes during the era. The Enlightenment cult of sensibility influenced parents to become more emotive and demonstrative in their attentions to their offspring, so that the care, love, protection, companionship, and guidance bestowed upon children also became metaphors for the parental role in a Christian society, and defined a parent's identity as a constructive member of the family, the community, and the nation. A father could be as unabashedly tender as a mother to his children, with society's blessing. The fragility of life also meant that parental identity could end abruptly when a child died. In such cases, the child lived on in memory. By the end of the period, however, fears that masculine tenderness was a symptom of weakness in the nation encouraged fathers to become more stoic and aloof. Although Bailey (Oxford Brookes Univ., UK) incorporates material from a variety of contemporary sources, including fiction, illustrated periodicals, and official records, her evidence is often anecdotal and unconvincing, and the text is regrettably dry and abstruse. Summing Up: Optional. Specialists only. E. J. Jenkins Arkansas Tech University
Reviews
Review Quotes
a detailed, fascinating picture from the letters of aristocrats, paupers, business and professional families, memoirs, diaries, biographies, paphlets, magazines, literary and visual works.
an outstanding book, which will open up a new area of research for historians of the family.
this study offers an extremely sensitive, historiographically wide-ranging, and methodologically innovative consideration of the subject of parenthood and parenting from the perspectives of both parents and children.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of the world of parenting in late Georgian England. Based on extensive and wide-ranging sources from memoirs and correspondence, to fiction, advice guides, and engravings, Bailey uncovers how people, from the poor to the rich, thought about themselves as parents and remembered their own parents.
Long Description
Parenting in England is the first study of the world of parenting in late Georgian England. The author, Joanne Bailey, traces ideas about parenthood in a Christian society that was responding to new cultural trends of sensibility, romanticism and domesticity, along with Enlightenment ideas about childhood and self. All these shaped how people, from the poor to the genteel, thought about themselves as parents, and remembered their own parents. With meticulous attention to detail, Bailey illuminates the range of intense emotions provoked by parenthood by investigating a rich array of sources from memoirs and correspondence, to advice literature, fiction, and court records, to prints, engravings, and ballads. Parenting was also a profoundly embodied experience, and the book captures the effort, labour, and hard work it entailed. Such parental investment meant that the experience was fundamental to the forging of national, familial, andpersonal identities. It also needed more than two parents and this book uncovers the hitherto hidden world of shared parenting. At all levels of society, household and kinship ties were drawn upon to lighten the labours of parenting. By revealing these emotional and material parental worlds, what emerges is the centrality of parenthood to mental and physical well-being, reputation, public and personal identities, and to transmitting prized values across generations. Yet being a parent was a contingent experience adapting from hour to hour, year to year, and child to child. It was at once precarious, as children and parents succumbed to fatal diseases and accidents, yet it was also enduring because parent-child relationshipswere not ended by death: lost children and parents lived on in memory.
Main Description
Parenting in England is the first study of the world of parenting in late Georgian England. The author, Joanne Bailey, traces ideas about parenthood in a Christian society that was responding to new cultural trends of sensibility, romanticism and domesticity, along with Enlightenment ideas about childhood and self. All these shaped how people, from the poor to the genteel, thought about themselves as parents, and remembered their own parents. With meticulous attention to detail, Bailey illuminates the range of intense emotions provoked by parenthood by investigating a rich array of sources from memoirs and correspondence, to advice literature, fiction, and court records, to prints, engravings, and ballads. Parenting was also a profoundly embodied experience, and the book captures the effort, labour, and hard work it entailed. Such parental investment meant that the experience was fundamental to the forging of national, familial, and personal identities. It also needed morethan two parents and this book uncovers the hitherto hidden world of shared parenting. At all levels of society, household and kinship ties were drawn upon to lighten the labours of parenting. By revealing these emotional and material parental worlds, what emerges is the centrality of parenthood to mental and physical well-being, reputation, public and personal identities, and to transmitting prized values across generations. Yet being a parent was a contingent experience adapting from hour to hour, year to year, and child to child. It was at once precarious, as children and parents succumbed to fatal diseases and accidents, yet it was also enduring because parent-child relationships were not ended by death: lost children and parents lived on in memory.
Main Description
Parenting in England is the first study of the world of parenting in late Georgian England. The author, Joanne Bailey, traces ideas about parenthood in a Christian society that was responding to new cultural trends of sensibility, romanticism and domesticity, along with Enlightenment ideasabout childhood and self. All these shaped how people, from the poor to the genteel, thought about themselves as parents, and remembered their own parents. With meticulous attention to detail, Bailey illuminates the range of intense emotions provoked by parenthood by investigating a rich array of sources from memoirs and correspondence, to advice literature, fiction, and court records, to prints, engravings, and ballads. Parenting was also a profoundlyembodied experience, and the book captures the effort, labour, and hard work it entailed. Such parental investment meant that the experience was fundamental to the forging of national, familial, and personal identities. It also needed more than two parents and this book uncovers the hitherto hiddenworld of shared parenting. At all levels of society, household and kinship ties were drawn upon to lighten the labours of parenting. By revealing these emotional and material parental worlds, what emerges is the centrality of parenthood to mental and physical well-being, reputation, public and personal identities, and to transmitting prized values across generations. Yet being a parent was a contingent experience adapting fromhour to hour, year to year, and child to child. It was at once precarious, as children and parents succumbed to fatal diseases and accidents, yet it was also enduring because parent-child relationships were not ended by death: lost children and parents lived on in memory.
Main Description
Parenting in Englandis the first study of the world of parenting in late Georgian England. The author, Joanne Bailey, traces ideas about parenthood in a Christian society that was responding to new cultural trends of sensibility, romanticism and domesticity, along with Enlightenment ideas about childhood and self. All these shaped how people, from the poor to the genteel, thought about themselves as parents, and remembered their own parents. With meticulous attention to detail, Bailey illuminates the range of intense emotions provoked by parenthood by investigating a rich array of sources from memoirs and correspondence, to advice literature, fiction, and court records, to prints, engravings, and ballads. Parenting was also a profoundly embodied experience, and the book captures the effort, labour, and hard work it entailed. Such parental investment meant that the experience was fundamental to the forging of national, familial, and personal identities. It also needed more than two parents and this book uncovers the hitherto hidden world of shared parenting. At all levels of society, household and kinship ties were drawn upon to lighten the labours of parenting. By revealing these emotional and material parental worlds, what emerges is the centrality of parenthood to mental and physical well-being, reputation, public and personal identities, and to transmitting prized values across generations. Yet being a parent was a contingent experience adapting from hour to hour, year to year, and child to child. It was at once precarious, as children and parents succumbed to fatal diseases and accidents, yet it was also enduring because parent-child relationships were not ended by death: lost children and parents lived on in memory.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Georgian parents and their world
Parenting and parenthood: ideals, representations, and meanings
The emotional and feeling parent
The embodied and providing parent
The disciplining and instructive parent
Parenting and parenthood: public, family, and personal identities
Parenthood and public identity: symbolic parents
Family identity: parentage, parents, and being parented
Selfhood and being a parent: cultural conventions, tensions, and complexities
Generations: transmitted values, shared endeavours, and evolving relationships
Transferring values
Shared parenting
Changing relationships
Conclusion
Appendix
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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