Catalogue


Dahomey and the ending of the trans-Atlantic slave trade : the journals and correspondence of Vice-Consul Louis Fraser, 1851-1852 /
edited by Robin Law.
imprint
Oxford : Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
287 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0197265219 (hbk.), 9780197265215 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Oxford : Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0197265219 (hbk.)
9780197265215 (hbk.)
abstract
The British Vice-Consulate for the kingdom of Dahomey was established to suppress the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The documents collected here comprise principally of the journals of the Vice-Consul, Louis Fraser, which provide valuable insights into British policy on the slave trade.
catalogue key
8501949
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-280) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The British Vice-Consulate for the kingdom of Dahomey was established to suppress the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The documents collected here comprise principally of the journals of the Vice-Consul, Louis Fraser, which provide valuable insights into British policy on the slave trade.
Main Description
Fontes Historiae Africanae / Sources of African History is an international editing and publication project, initiated in 1962 to organise a series of critical editions of the sources for the history of sub-Saharan Africa (i.e. Africa south of the Mediterranean lands), under the general auspices of the Union Académique Internationale.
Main Description
The Vice-Consulate in the coastal port of Ouidah, in the kingdom of Dahomey, West African (now in the modern Republic of Benin) was established in1851-2 as part of the British government's efforts to suppress the trans-Atlantic slave trade. In particular it was hoped to persuade King Gezo to accept a treaty banning exports of slaves from his dominions. Louis Fraser proved a poor choice as Vice-Consul: he was no linguist, abrasive with naval colleagues and arrogant towards the king and people of Ouidah. However, his shortcomings as a diplomat do not detract from the value of his account as a historical resource. The documents collected here comprise principally the journals of the Vice-Consul, Louis Fraser, together with letters and other reports by him, a selection of the documents referred to in his journals, and letters and reports by other British officials (especially officers of the navy's West African squadron) which refer to his activities. These documents are valuable sources, not only for the history of British policy on the slave trade, but also for the history of Dahomey, which was one of the most important indigenous states in coastal West Africa in the nineteenth century. Fraser was one of a number of British visitors to Dahomey in the mid-nineteenth century, many of whom left published accounts. Fraser's account, in contrast, was never published, and so has remained less known. Its publication now brings it more effectively within the public domain.
Long Description
The Vice-Consulate in the coastal port of Ouidah, in the kingdom of Dahomey, West African (now in the modern Republic of Bénin) was established in1851-2 as part of the British government's efforts to suppress the trans-Atlantic slave trade. In particular it was hoped to persuade King Gezo to accept a treaty banning exports of slaves from his dominions.Louis Fraser proved a poor choice as Vice-Consul: he was no linguist, abrasive with naval colleagues and arrogant towards the king and people of Ouidah. However, his shortcomings as a diplomat do not detract from the value of his account as a historical resource.The documents collected here comprise principally the journals of the Vice-Consul, Louis Fraser, together with letters and other reports by him, a selection of the documents referred to in his journals, and letters and reports by other British officials (especially officers of the navy's West African squadron) which refer to his activities. These documents are valuable sources, not only for the history of British policy on the slave trade, but also for the history of Dahomey, which was one ofthe most important indigenous states in coastal West Africa in the nineteenth century.Fraser was one of a number of British visitors to Dahomey in the mid-nineteenth century, many of whom left published accounts. Fraser's account, in contrast, was never published, and so has remained less known. Its publication now brings it more effectively within the public domain.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. vi
Introductionp. 1
The Journals and Correspondence of Vice-Consul Louis Fraser
Journalsp. 23
The Case of Richard Gravesp. 175
Additional Dispatches and Reportsp. 185
Appendices
Instructions given to Vice-Consul Fraserp. 203
Documents referred to in the Journals and Dispatchesp. 207
Letters from naval officers etc. referring to Fraser's Vice-Consulatep. 239
Endnotes
The Dahomian 'Annual Customs'p. 263
Monetary Valuesp. 271
Sources and Bibliographyp. 275
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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