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Late prehistoric Florida : archaeology at the edge of the Mississippian world /
edited by Keith Ashley and Nancy Marie White.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
description
xii, 398 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0813040140 (alk. paper), 9780813040141 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
isbn
0813040140 (alk. paper)
9780813040141 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
8490177
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [311]-361) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Keith Ashley is coordinator of archaeological research and instructor of anthropology at the University of North Florida. Nancy Marie White, professor of anthropology at the University of South Florida, is author of Archaeology for Dummies and editor of Gulf Coast Archaeology.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-02-01:
This 12-chapter study focuses on the scale of interaction between Florida's Native societies ca. 1000-1600 CE and the Mississippian maize-dependent societies to the north. Given the peninsular seacoast nature and ecological diversity of the panhandle, its people interacted strongly with the Mississippian world as expressed in the Fort Walton complexes; the further south one moves, the less that world had an impact. For example, the Calusa of the southwest region were involved in aspects of Mississippian trade, but maintained their separate fisherfolk ways. This was also true of the peoples of the southern and central Atlantic coastal areas. The natives of northeast Florida around St. Johns had an early Mississippian exposure, especially in trading raw shell for exotics, but with the panhandle developments, that stopped. Southernmost central and south Florida complexes have some Mississippian artifacts traded via ancient canoe routes, but maize agriculture and temple mound construction were not present. The last chapter, by a Cahokia specialist, discusses the obvious trade and Mississippianization of the panhandle, but points out that the elaborate cultural traditions of the natives of southern Florida are independent developments. The book's main audience: professional archaeologists. Summing Up: Recommended. Faculty, professionals. P. J. O'Brien emerita, Kansas State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2013
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"The view often is clearer when one looks from the outside in rather than the reverse. Geographically situated on the edge of mainstream Mississippian cultural developments, Florida harbored an array of cultures whose study provides insights into the nature of the entire Southeast in the centuries before the European invasion. Late Prehistoric Floridais a seminal contribution to archaeology, one that allows us to see both the trees and forest."-Jerald T. Milanich, author of Florida Indians from Ancient Times to the Present "Forces us to re-envision the Mississippian world with the Native polities of Florida as part of the broader cultural mosaic. It is not surprising that many of the areas represented in this book diverge from models and ideas developed in the 'core' areas in significant ways."-Victor D. Thompson, Ohio State University "For a long time, Florida's late prehistoric societies have been viewed and explored through a lens developed to understand their Mississippian neighbors to the north. This book makes a strong case that the societies of late prehistoric Florida must be explored on their own terms."-Adam King, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology Featuring contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the field, this collection describes and synthesizes the latest data from archaeological excavations throughout Florida. In doing so, it reveals a diverse and vibrant collection of cleared-field maize farmers, part-time gardeners, hunter-gatherers, and coastal and riverine fisher/shellfish collectors who formed a distinctive part of the Mississippian Southeast. Keith Ashleyis coordinator of archaeological research and instructor of anthropology at the University of North Florida. Nancy Marie White, professor of anthropology at the University of South Florida, is author of Archaeology for Dummiesand editor of Gulf Coast Archaeology.
Description for Bookstore
"Forces us to re-envision the Mississippian world with the Native polities of Florida as part of the broader cultural mosaic. It is not surprising that many of the areas represented in this book diverge from models and ideas developed in the 'core' areas in significant ways."--Victor D. Thompson, Ohio State University "For a long time, Florida's late prehistoric societies have been viewed and explored through a lens developed to understand their Mississippian neighbors to the north. This book makes a strong case that the societies of late prehistoric Florida must be explored on their own terms."--Adam King, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology Prehistoric Florida societies, particularly those of the peninsula, have been largely ignored or given only minor consideration in overviews of the Mississippian southeast (A.D. 1000-1600). This groundbreaking volume lifts the veil of uniformity frequently draped over these regions in the literature, providing the first comprehensive examination of Mississippi-period archaeology in the state. Featuring contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the field, this collection describes and synthesizes the latest data from excavations throughout Florida. In doing so, it reveals a diverse and vibrant collection of cleared-field maize farmers, part-time gardeners, hunter-gatherers, and coastal and riverine fisher/shellfish collectors who formed a distinctive part of the Mississipian southeast.
Main Description
Prehistoric Florida societies, particularly those of the peninsula, have been largely ignored or given only minor consideration in overviews of the Mississippian southeast (A.D. 1000-1600). This groundbreaking volume lifts the veil of uniformity frequently draped over these regions in the literature, providing the first comprehensive examination of Mississippi-period archaeology in the state. Featuring contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the field, this collection describes and synthesizes the latest data from excavations throughout Florida. In doing so, it reveals a diverse and vibrant collection of cleared-field maize farmers, part-time gardeners, hunter-gatherers, and coastal and riverine fisher/shellfish collectors who formed a distinctive part of the Mississippian southeast.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Tablesp. ix
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Late Prehistoric Florida: An Introductionp. 1
Southwest Florida during the Mississippi Periodp. 29
Mississippian Influence in the Glades, Belle Glade, and East Okeechobee Areas of South Floridap. 62
The Indian River Region during the Mississippi Periodp. 81
Early St. Johns II Interaction, Exchange, and Politics: A View from Northeastern Floridap. 100
The Alachua of North-Central Floridap. 126
An Overview of the Suwannee Valley Culturep. 149
Safety Harbor: Mississippian Influence in the Circum-Tampa Bay Regionp. 172
Fort Walton Culture in the Tallahassee Hillsp. 186
Fort Walton Culture in the Apalachicola Valley, Northwest Floridap. 231
Defining Pensacola and Fort Walton Cultures in the Western Panhandlep. 275
The Mississippi Period in Florida: A View from the Mississippian World of Cahokiap. 296
References Citedp. 311
List of Contributorsp. 363
Indexp. 365
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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