Catalogue


The social space of language : vernacular culture in British colonial Punjab /
Farina Mir.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
description
xiii, 277 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520262697 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520262690 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
isbn
0520262697 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520262690 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Forging a language policy -- Punjabi print culture -- A Punjabi literary formation -- Place and personhood -- Piety and devotion -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
8452166
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-270) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a pioneering study. Mir draws upon largely unfamiliar material and suggests new approaches to religio-cultural questions of great importance to South Asianists across a wide disciplinary spectrum."--Christopher Shackle, SOAS, University of London "Mir makes creative use of archival and folkloric material to tell the history of a composite, modern, and gendered Punjabi self in colonial India that was sadly lost in the welter of partition politics and violence. The story of the legendary lvoers Heer and Ranjha haunts her narrative like an artistic lament about a lost Punjabi self without in any way compromising the academic quality of her research and the rigor of her exposition. A very significant contribution to South Asian history."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, The University of Chicago
Flap Copy
"This is a pioneering study. Mir draws upon largely unfamiliar material and suggests new approaches to religio-cultural questions of great importance to South Asianists across a wide disciplinary spectrum."--Christopher Shackle, SOAS, University of London
Flap Copy
"This is a pioneering study. Mir draws upon largely unfamiliar material and suggests new approaches to religio-cultural questions of great importance to South Asianists across a wide disciplinary spectrum."--Christopher Shackle, SOAS, University of London "Mir makes creative use of archival and folkloric material to tell the history of a composite, modern, and gendered Punjabi self in colonial India that was sadly lost in the welter of partition politics and violence. The story of the legendary lovers Heer and Ranjha haunts her narrative like an artistic lament about a lost Punjabi self without in any way compromising the academic quality of her research and the rigor of her exposition. A very significant contribution to South Asian history."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, The University of Chicago "Farina Mir has given us an outstanding work of literary and cultural history. She skillfully unravels the many versions of the famous folk-tale about Hir and Ranjha to illuminate gender, class and community relations in Punjab. This book will compel historians to rethink the links between language, religion and power and to reconsider the contingencies of union and partition in late colonial India."--Sugata Bose, author ofA Hundred Horizons "Mir's archival work covers and foregrounds the breadth of the story-telling or qissa tradition, great and little, high and low, Sufi, Sikh and Hindu, showing its wide dissemination. Mir's findings are of immense significance, given the turbulent history of the region in post-independence India and the political turmoil today, particularly on the Pakistani side of the border. Panjabi seldom finds this kind of focus in cultural history."--Vasudha Dalmia, University of California, Berkeley
Summaries
Main Description
This rich cultural history set in Punjab examines a little-studied body of popular literature to illustrate both the durability of a vernacular literary tradition and the limits of colonial dominance in British India. Farina Mir asks howqisse, a vibrant genre of epics and romances, flourished in colonial Punjab despite British efforts to marginalize the Punjabi language. She explores topics including Punjabi linguistic practices, print and performance, and the symbolic content ofqisse.She finds that although the British denied Punjabi language and literature almost all forms of state patronage, the resilience of this popular genre came from its old but dynamic corpus of stories, their representations of place, and the moral sensibility that suffused them. Her multidisciplinary study reframes inquiry into cultural formations in late-colonial north India away from a focus on religious communal identities and nationalist politics and toward a widespread, ecumenical, and place-centered poetics of belonging in the region.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This cultural history set in Punjab examines a little-studied body of popular literature to illustrate both the durability of a vernacular literary tradition and the limits of colonial dominance in British India.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
A Note on Translation, Transliteration, and Use of Foreign Termsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Forging a Language Policyp. 27
Punjabi Print Culturep. 62
A Punjabi Literary Formationp. 91
Place and Personhoodp. 123
Piety and Devotionp. 150
Conclusionp. 183
Colonial-Era Hir-Ranjha Texts Consultedp. 195
Punjabi Newspapers, 1880-1905p. 203
Punjabi Books Published Prior to 1867p. 206
Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 245
Indexp. 271
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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