Catalogue

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Environment and object : recent African art /
edited by Lisa Aronson and John S. Weber.
imprint
Saratoga Springs, NY : Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, 2012.
description
151 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), col. maps ; 30 cm.
ISBN
9783791352091 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Saratoga Springs, NY : Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, 2012.
isbn
9783791352091 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Land, landscape and contested spaces / Lisa Aronson -- "That is our bitterness": enslavement by oil in the Niger Delta / Karen Kellogg -- Negotiated relationships: a conversation with Chika Okeke-Agulu on African modernism and contemporary African art : interview with Lisa Aronson and John S. Weber -- Found, remade, repurposed, transformed / John S. Weber -- "She speaks with the wisdom of god": traversing visible and invisible worlds in African environmental arts / Mark Auslander -- Object, environment, and political economy in contemporary African art / Christopher A. Whann.
general note
"This publication accompanies the exhibition Environment and Object - Recent African Art curated by Lisa Aronson and John S. Weber"--P. [8].
catalogue key
8451935
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The definition of a new African artist is as broad and diverse as the continent itself; and the stories these artists tell are at once uplifting and devastating, as are their nations' histories. This book focuses on the impact of the environment on contemporary African life and the use of found objects and appropriated materials in current African art. Artists from the oil-rich Niger Delta create images of the region's ecological destruction, impoverishment, and despair
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-10-01:
This exhibition catalogue goes beyond illustration and analysis of art. Essay authors focus on Africa's environment from discipline-specific positions, which makes this publication useful outside the art arena. Among the contributors are art historians, ecologists, anthropologists, artists, curators, museum administrators, and economists. European and United States art establishments have, over the last two decades, noticeably embraced a number of contemporary African artists. This publication forwards 16 living African artists representing countries that reach across the continent from Egypt to South Africa. The majority use multimedia, which incorporates found/repurposed objects to stunning effect--especially in installations such as those by Viye Diba and Bright Ugochukwu Eke. Unfortunately, it is through refuse that a globalized Africa becomes recognizable. Readers will find humor exhibited throughout this catalogue, but it is tamped by Africa's ecological malaise. All the contributors address the seriousness of nature's demise at the hands of man. But, the interview with Chika Okeke-Agulu is poignant. Only Okeke-Agulu mentions how this exhibition portrays a high level of concern for the environment that is essentially nonexistent for African artists. What one sees are resourceful artists making the most of materials at hand to reveal their truths. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates through researchers/faculty; general readers. M. R. Vendryes independent scholar
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The definition of a new African artist is as broad and diverse as the continent itself, and the stories these artists tell are at once uplifting and devastating, as are their nations' histories. This book focuses on the impact of the environment on contemporary African life and the use of found objects and appropriated materials in current African art.
Main Description
The definition of a new African artist is as broad and diverse as the continent itself; and the stories these artists tell are at once uplifting and devastating, as are their nations' histories. This book focuses on the impact of the environment on contemporary African life and the use of found objects and appropriated materials in current African art. Artists from the oil-rich Niger Delta create images of the region's ecological destruction, impoverishment, and despair. Works from the Congo and South Africa depict abandoned mines and convict labor. Also included are El Anatsui's constructs made from bottle caps and wire and Romuald Hazoumé's clever masks, pieced together from discarded cans and obsolete telephone parts. Together these artists have created a multidimensional portrait of a continent with rich cultures, multiple challenges, and a creative and resourceful population of inspiring artists.

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