Catalogue


A history of organ transplantation : ancient legends to modern practice /
David Hamilton ; with a foreword by Clyde F. Barker and Thomas E. Starzl.
imprint
Pittsburgh, Pa. : University of Pittsburgh Press, c2012.
description
xx, 556 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0822944138 (hardcover : acid-free paper), 9780822944133 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Pittsburgh, Pa. : University of Pittsburgh Press, c2012.
isbn
0822944138 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
9780822944133 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
contents note
Introduction: Toward the Impossible -- Early Transplantation -- The Eighteenth Century -- The Reawakening -- Clinical and Academic Transplantation in Paris -- The Beginning of Organ Transplantation -- The Lost Era of Transplantation Immunology -- Anarchy in the 1920s -- Progress in the 1930s -- Understanding the Mechanism -- Experimental Organ Transplantation -- Transplantation Tolerance and Beyond -- Hopes for Radiation Tolerance -- The Emergence of Chemical Immunosuppression -- Support from Hemodialysis and Immunology in the 1960s -- Progress in the Mid-1960s -- Brain Death and the "Year of the Heart" -- The Plateau of the Early 1970s -- The Arrival of Cyclosporine -- Waiting for the Xenografts -- Conclusion: Lessons from the History of Transplantation.
catalogue key
8450974
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 527-537) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2012-06-01:
Retired transplant surgeon Hamilton (medical history, St. Andrews Univ. Medical Sch., Scotland; The Healers: A History of Medicine in Scotland) has written a comprehensive, authoritative history of a transformative field of medicine. He traces the origins of organ transplantation to skin grafting procedures that restored the noses of criminals and political prisoners punished with disfiguring amputations in fifth century B.C.E. India. This technique was briefly resurrected by an Italian surgeon in the 16th century and later rediscovered in India by British colonists in the early 19th century. As Hamilton illustrates, the episodic history of skin transplants parallels the development of transplant surgery as a whole. Only by the 1970s were the technology, cell and genetic science, pharmacology, and legal framework available to match the skills of surgeons. With all the pieces finally in place, lifesaving transplantations of major organs became relatively routine. VERDICT This history is well crafted and global in scope. Although its length and detail may daunt general readers, scholars and historians of medicine will find Hamilton a thorough guide to a complex subject.-Kathy Arsenault, St. Petersburg, FL (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2012-12-01:
What a superb book! Hamilton, a retired transplant surgeon and currently a lecturer at the University of St. Andrews School of Medicine (Scotland), is not content merely to list achievements in organ transplantation from antiquity through the end of the 20th century. Instead, he has written a wide-ranging, comprehensive evaluation of the factors--including luck--that account for this intellectually imposing specialty. This is probably the first history of the field that will make it look complete and recognizable to its practitioners. Historians of medicine will admire the book for its critical use of primary documents. Those who study immunology or hematology or their histories will also profit greatly from it. The notes are old-fashioned, i.e., they go beyond lists of citations and include background explanations and suggestions for further reading. The bibliography contains all major primary and secondary sources on the topics presented. The index is full and accurate. And not to be neglected is the fact that the book is pleasurable to read. Hamilton is a master of style, and readers will not be disappointed. No serious library should be without this book. Summing Up: Essential. All health sciences students, researchers/faculty, professionals, and informed general audiences. T. P. Gariepy Stonehill College
Reviews
Review Quotes
This beautiful history . . . gives a sense of the vivacity of scientific experience, its errors and insights, and the way in which cultural traits, individual lives, and technical knowledge combine to create a field of clinical medicine. . . . Those who are willing to read David Hamilton will find a well-written and exciting history-physiology and medicine, and the lives of those who pursue them, will seem more fascinating, and science more wild and willful. -Times Literary Supplement (TLS)
"What a superb book! Hamilton, a retired transplant surgeon . . . is not content merely to list achievements in organ transplantation from antiquity through the end of the 20th century. Instead, he has written a wide-ranging, comprehensive evaluation of the factors--inculding luck--that account for this intellectually imposing specialty. This is probably the first history of the field that will make it look complete and recognizable to practitioners. Historians of medicine wiill admire the book for its critical use of primary documents. Those who study immunology or hematology or their histories will also profit greatly from it. . . a pleasure to read. Hamilton is a master of style, and readers will not be disappointed. No serious library should be without this book. Summing up: Essential." --Choice
"A comprehensive, authoritative history of a transformative field of medicine. Well crafted and global in scope. . . . scholars and historians of medicine will find Hamilton a thorough guide to a complex subject." --Library Journal
"A comprehensive, authoritative history of a transformative field of medicine. Well crafted and global in scope. . . . scholars and historians of medicine will find Hamilton a thorough guide to a complex subject." -Library Journal
"David Hamilton has written a history of transplantation that is unmatched in its scope, perceptiveness and readability. The masterly account he has crafted comes at an appropriate time, since organ transplantation has now become widely accepted, as the best therapy for many otherwise fatal diseases. The surgeon-author of this book has watched and participated in many of the events as the field evolved over the last half century. Having looked back as an informed insider, he has added his historian's detachment and insight to the narrative. . . . Hamilton is clear that, in surgery at least, there is no single method of discovery but rather a rich variety of methods. Adding to his text are extensive scholarly citations that give a helpful road map into the vast literature on organ transplantation. As this book clearly shows, developing transplantation as a clinical service was not simply a surgical matter, limited to the attainment of technical success. Hamilton describes the crucial multiple influences, helpful and otherwise, that came into play." --Clyde Barker, M.D. and Thomas E. Starzl, M.D., Ph.D., from the Foreword
"David Hamilton has written a history of transplantation that is unmatched in its scope, perceptiveness and readability. The masterly account he has crafted comes at an appropriate time, since organ transplantation has now become widely accepted, as the best therapy for many otherwise fatal diseases. The surgeon-author of this book has watched and participated in many of the events as the field evolved over the last half century. Having looked back as an informed insider, he has added his historian's detachment and insight to the narrative. . . . Hamilton is clear that, in surgery at least, there is no single method of discovery but rather a rich variety of methods. Adding to his text are extensive scholarly citations that give a helpful road map into the vast literature on organ transplantation. As this book clearly shows, developing transplantation as a clinical service was not simply a surgical matter, limited to the attainment of technical success. Hamilton describes the crucial multiple influences, helpful and otherwise, that came into play." -Clyde Barker, M.D. and Thomas E. Starzl, M.D., Ph.D., from the Foreword
"I have learnt a huge amount from this book, and it is humbling to realise once again how privileged I am as a transplant surgeon to be part of this legacy spanning several hundred years, giving new meaning to the phrase 'standing on the shoulders of giants'." --Lorna Marson for Surgeons' News
"Written for the average reader without ignoring scientific detail." --Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Written for the average reader without ignoring scientific detail." -Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"What a superb book! Hamilton, a retired transplant surgeon . . . is not content merely to list achievements in organ transplantation from antiquity through the end of the 20th century. Instead, he has written a wide-ranging, comprehensive evaluation of the factors--inculding luck--that account for this intellectually imposing specialty. This is probably the first history of the field that will make it look complete and recognizable to practitioners. Historians of medicine wiill admire the book for its critical use of primary documents. Those who study immunology or hematology or their histories will also profit greatly from it. . . a pleasure to read. Hamilton is a master of style, and readers will not be disappointed. No serious library should be without this book. Summing up: Essential." -Choice
"This beautiful history . . . gives a sense of the vivacity of scientific experience, its errors and insights, and the way in which cultural traits, individual lives, and technical knowledge combine to create a field of clinical medicine. . . . Those who are willing to read David Hamilton will find a well-written and exciting history--physiology and medicine, and the lives of those who pursue them, will seem more fascinating, and science more wild and willful." --Times Literary Supplement (TLS)
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2012
Choice, December 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Foreword by Clyde Barker and Thomas E. Starzl A History of Organ Transplantation is a comprehensive and ambitious exploration of transplant surgery-which, surprisingly, is one of the longest continuous medical endeavors in history. Moreover, no other medical enterprise has had so many multiple interactions with other fields, including biology, ethics, law, government, and technology. Exploring the medical, scientific, and surgical events that led to modern transplant techniques, Hamilton argues that progress in successful transplantation required a unique combination of multiple methods, bold surgical empiricism, and major immunological insights in order for surgeons to develop an understanding of the body's most complex and mysterious mechanisms. Surgical progress was nonlinear, sometimes reverting and sometimes significantly advancing through luck, serendipity, or helpful accidents of nature. The first book of its kind, A History of Organ Transplantation examines the evolution of surgical tissue replacement from classical times to the medieval period to the present day. This well-executed volume will be useful to undergraduates, graduate students, scholars, surgeons, and the general public. Both Western and non-Western experiences as well as folk practices are included.
Main Description
Foreword by Clyde Barker and Thomas E. Starzl A History of Organ Transplantation is a comprehensive and ambitious exploration of transplant surgery -- which, surprisingly, is one of the longest continuous medical endeavors in history. Moreover, no other medical enterprise has had so many multiple interactions with other fields, including biology, ethics, law, government, and technology. Exploring the medical, scientific, and surgical events that led to modern transplant techniques, Hamilton argues that progress in successful transplantation required a unique combination of multiple methods, bold surgical empiricism, and major immunological insights in order for surgeons to develop an understanding of the bodys most complex and mysterious mechanisms. Surgical progress was nonlinear, sometimes reverting and sometimes significantly advancing through luck, serendipity, or helpful accidents of nature. The first book of its kind, A History of Organ Transplantation examines the evolution of surgical tissue replacement from classical times to the medieval period to the present day. This well-executed volume will be useful to undergraduates, graduate students, scholars, surgeons, and the general public. Both Western and non-Western experiences as well as folk practices are included.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Toward the Impossiblep. xiii
Early Transplantationp. 1
The Eighteenth Centuryp. 31
The Reawakeningp. 49
Clinical and Academic Transplantation in Parisp. 65
The Beginning of Organ Transplantationp. 88
The "Lost Era" of Transplantation Immunologyp. 105
Anarchy in the 1920sp. 126
Progress in the 1930sp. 154
Understanding the Mechanismp. 173
Experimental Organ Transplantationp. 195
Transplantation Tolerance and Beyondp. 221
Hopes for Radiation Tolerancep. 254
The Emergence of Chemical Immunosuppressionp. 269
Support from Hemodialysis and Immunology in the 1960sp. 296
Progress in the Mid-1960sp. 314
Brain Death and the "Year of the Heart"p. 340
The Plateau of the Early 1970sp. 359
The Arrival of Cyclosporinep. 380
Waiting for the Xenograftsp. 413
Conclusion: Lessons from the History of Transplantationp. 423
Notesp. 431
Bibliographic Essayp. 527
Indexp. 539
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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