Catalogue


An introduction to British Arthurian narrative /
Susan Aronstein ; foreword by R. Barton Palmer and Tison Pugh.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2012.
description
xvi, 188 p.
ISBN
0813041899 (hbk : alk. paper), 9780813041896 (hbk : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2012.
isbn
0813041899 (hbk : alk. paper)
9780813041896 (hbk : alk. paper)
contents note
Arthurian history -- British Arthurian romance -- This noble and joyous book entitled Le morte d'Arthur : Caxton's Malory.
catalogue key
8444940
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [181]-184) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Susan Aronstein, professor of English at the University of Wyoming, is the author of Hollywood Knights: Arthurian Cinema and the Politics of Nostalgia as well as numerous articles on medieval and modern Arthurian narratives.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-11-01:
This most recent offering in the "New Perspectives on Medieval Literature: Authors and Traditions" series presents an insightful study of the British origins of the Arthurian tales. Aronstein (Univ. of Wyoming) covers several hundred years of historical context and popular culture in her exploration of the cultural roots that make the narratives distinctly British, but she does not ignore the Welsh and Norman contributions to the literary tradition. Her discussion of the texts from chronicles to romance focuses on four areas: Arthur's history, chivalric adventures, the Arthur-Guinevere-Lancelot triangle, and the Grail quest. Aronson handles versions of the tales arising from popular tradition and indicates the importance of these literary strands in the development of the Arthurian canon. Most recognizable among her sources are Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. These well-known texts conclude the study with an affirmation of the author's purpose of defining the British characteristics in the Arthurian tales. Supporting materials include an Arthurian chronology, a glossary, and a reading list that includes both Arthurian texts and literary and historical resources. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. H. Kealy Immaculata University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2012
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"Whether discussing how the figure of Arthur was appropriated by Welsh lords to justify acts of rebellions or by English kings to support a centralized monarchy, Aronstein subtly and intelligently recognizes complex interrelationships between history and art."--Martin Shichtman, Eastern Michigan University "A must-have for all those interested in King Arthur--from the amateur enthusiast to the established scholar."--Dorsey Armstrong, Purdue University The legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table permeate our culture: we find them in novels, movie parodies, and even the American government. Yet beneath and before it all lies a deep literary tradition that has influenced history, art, and culture over the centuries. Examining the legend at its very source, An Introduction to British Arthurian Narrative covers over 400 years and discusses a broad range of romances, histories, and parodies written about King Arthur in Britain during the medieval period. The modern Anglo-American version of the Arthurian tale stems from Sir Thomas Malory's fifteenth-century compendium Le Morte D'Arthur , which was written at the end of the tale's first period of widespread popularity, which began in the early twelfth century. Susan Aronstein demonstrates that, as Arthur's transformation from a "leader of battles" in early histories, to a powerful chieftain in Welsh tales, and, finally, into England's "once and future king," at every point, these tales reflected the ongoing contest for sovereignty over the island of Britain--and the very definition of "British." Susan Aronstein, professor of English at the University of Wyoming, is the author of Hollywood Knights: Arthurian Cinema and the Politics of Nostalgia as well as numerous articles on medieval and modern Arthurian narratives.
Main Description
The legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table permeate our culture: we find them in novels, movie parodies, and even the American government. Yet beneath and before it all lies a deep literary tradition that has influenced history, art, and culture over the centuries. Examining the legend at its very source, An Introduction to British Arthurian Narrative covers over 400 years and discusses a broad range of romances, histories, and parodies written about King Arthur in Britain during the medieval period. The modern Anglo-American version of the Arthurian tale stems from Sir Thomas Malory's fifteenth-century compendium Le Morte D'Arthur , which was written at the end of the tale's first period of widespread popularity, which began in the early twelfth century. Susan Aronstein demonstrates that, as Arthur's transformation from a "leader of battles" in early histories, to a powerful chieftain in Welsh tales, and, finally, into England's "once and future king," at every point, these tales reflected the ongoing contest for sovereignty over the island of Britain--and the very definition of "British."
Table of Contents
Forewordp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Chronologyp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Arthurian Historyp. 12
British Arthurian Romancep. 55
"This Noble and Joyous Book Entitled Le Morte Darthur": Caxton's Maloryp. 148
Glossaryp. 171
Suggested Readingp. 181
Indexp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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