Catalogue

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Deconstructing the Cherokee nation [electronic resource] : town, region, and nation among eighteenth-century Cherokees /
Tyler Boulware.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
description
xii, 234 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813035805 (alk. paper), 9780813035802 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
isbn
0813035805 (alk. paper)
9780813035802 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Town, region, and nation -- "The antient friendship and union" : the Anglo-Cherokee alliance -- "In constant hostility with the Muskohge" : the Cherokee-Creek War -- "The disaffected people of great Tellico" : the struggle for empire in a Cherokee town -- "In a discontented mood" : the crisis in Virginia -- "Every town wept for some" : the Anglo-Cherokee War --"Now all our talks are about lands" : unstable borderlands -- "Half war half peace" : the American Revolution in Cherokee country -- Epilogue : toward the Cherokee Nation.
catalogue key
8441089
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2011
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"Boulware imaginatively shows how clan, town, and regional loyalties defined Cherokee society deep into the eighteenth century. During these decades the Cherokees were hardly a singular identity, as local communities and geopolitical divisions structured society and only hesitatingly allowed for a national community to emerge."--Andrew K. Frank, Florida State University "By exploring how village and regional affiliations shaped Cherokee life, Boulware illuminates the multilayered and dynamic nature of nationhood and Native self-definition. His nuanced analysis should lead all Native studies scholars to reconsider the persistent power of localism in Indian country."--Christina Snyder, Indiana University This significant contribution to Cherokee studies examines the tribe's life during the eighteenth century, up to the Removal. By revealing town loyalties and regional alliances, Tyler Boulware uncovers a persistent identification hierarchy among the colonial Cherokee. Boulware aims to fill the gap in Cherokee historical studies by addressing two significant aspects of Cherokee identity: town and region. Though other factors mattered, these were arguably the most recognizable markers by which Cherokee peoples structured group identity and influenced their interactions with outside groups during the colonial era. This volume focuses on the understudied importance of social and political ties that gradually connected villages and regions and slowly weakened the localism that dominated in earlier decades. It highlights the importance of borderland interactions to Cherokee political behavior and provides a nuanced investigation of the issue of Native American identity, bringing geographic relevance and distinctions to the topic. Tyler Boulwareis assistant professor of history at West Virginia University.
Main Description
This significant contribution to Cherokee studies examines the tribe's life during the eighteenth century, up to the Removal. By revealing town loyalties and regional alliances, Tyler Boulware uncovers a persistent identification hierarchy among the colonial Cherokee. Boulware aims to fill the gap in Cherokee historical studies by addressing two significant aspects of Cherokee identity: town and region. Though other factors mattered, these were arguably the most recognizable markers by which Cherokee peoples structured group identity and influenced their interactions with outside groups during the colonial era. This volume focuses on the understudied importance of social and political ties that gradually connected villages and regions and slowly weakened the localism that dominated in earlier decades. It highlights the importance of borderland interactions to Cherokee political behavior and provides a nuanced investigation of the issue of Native American identity, bringing geographic relevance and distinctions to the topic.

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