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Dangerous masculinities [electronic resource] : Conrad, Hemingway, and Lawrence /
Thomas Strychacz.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2008.
description
261 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0813031613 (acid-free paper), 9780813031613 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2008.
isbn
0813031613 (acid-free paper)
9780813031613 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8441071
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-253) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-07-01:
In one of his two previous books, Hemingway's Theaters of Masculinity (CH, May'04, 41-5176), Strychacz (Mills College) posited a revisionist study of masculinity in many of Hemingway's major works and advanced the thesis that masculine behavior in Hemingway's life and work is, in essence, theatrical display for an audience. In that sophisticated but recondite study, Strychacz rejected many existing critical assumptions, especially those about the code hero in Hemingway's work. In the present volume, he employs "virtually intact the same critical vocabulary [he] developed" in that earlier work and applies it to Hemingway's short story "The Capital of the World," Joseph Conrad's Lord Jim, and D. H. Lawrence's Women in Love. An example of his thesis and style: "I argue that this scene's dramatic and rhetorical staging of masculinity, its exposing of the processes of signification through which masculinity comes to be instantiated, is exemplary of numerous modernist works written by men." Well researched, with notes and an extensive bibliography, Strychacz's book--with its ingenious but somewhat arcane and Procrustean interpretations--will be better understood by scholars than by less experienced readers. Summing Up: Recommended. Comprehensive collections serving graduate students and researchers. B. H. Leeds Central Connecticut State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"Provocative and engaging, this book disrupts deeply held notions about the modernist canon and the practice of literary scholarship, and opens up new ways of reading familiar texts."--John Dudley, University of South Dakota In Dangerous Masculinities,Thomas Strychacz has as his goal nothing less than to turn scholarship on gender and modernism on its head. He focuses on the way some early twentieth-century writers portray masculinity as theatrical performance, and examines why scholars have generally overlooked that fact. Strychacz argues that writers such as Conrad, Hemingway, and Lawrence--often viewed as misogynist--actually represented masculinity in their works in terms of theatrical and rhetorical performances. They are theatrical in the sense that male characters keep staging themselves in competitive displays; rhetorical in the sense that these characters, and the very narrative form of the works in which they appear, render masculinity a kind of persuasive argument readers can and should debate. Perhaps most interesting is Strychacz's contention that scholarship has obscured the fact that often these writers were quite critical of masculinity. Writing with a clarity and scope that allows him to both invoke the Schwarzeneggarian "girly man" and borrow from the theories of Judith Butler and Bertolt Brecht, he fashions a critical method with which to explore the ways in which scholars gender texts by the very act of reading.
Description for Bookstore
"Provocative and engaging, this book disrupts deeply held notions about the modernist canon and the practice of literary scholarship, and opens up new ways of reading familiar texts."--John Dudley, University of South Dakota InDangerous Masculinities,Thomas Strychacz has as his goal nothing less than to turn scholarship on gender and modernism on its head. He focuses on the way some early twentieth-century writers portray masculinity as theatrical performance, and examines why scholars have generally overlooked that fact. Strychacz argues that writers such as Conrad, Hemingway, and Lawrence--often viewed as misogynist--actually represented masculinity in their works in terms of theatrical and rhetorical performances. They are theatrical in the sense that male characters keep staging themselves in competitive displays; rhetorical in the sense that these characters, and the very narrative form of the works in which they appear, render masculinity a kind of persuasive argument readers can and should debate. Perhaps most interesting is Strychacz's contention that scholarship has obscured the fact that often these writers were quite critical of masculinity. Writing with a clarity and scope that allows him to both invoke the Schwarzeneggarian "girly man" and borrow from the theories of Judith Butler and Bertolt Brecht, he fashions a critical method with which to explore the ways in which scholars gender texts by the very act of reading.
Main Description
In Dangerous Masculinities,Thomas Strychacz has as his goal nothing less than to turn scholarship on gender and modernism on its head. He focuses on the way some early twentieth-century writers portray masculinity as theatrical performance, and examines why scholars have generally overlooked that fact. Strychacz argues that writers such as Conrad, Hemingway, and Lawrence--often viewed as misogynist--actually represented masculinity in their works in terms of theatrical and rhetorical performances. They are theatrical in the sense that male characters keep staging themselves in competitive displays; rhetorical in the sense that these characters, and the very narrative form of the works in which they appear, render masculinity a kind of persuasive argument readers can and should debate. Perhaps most interesting is Strychacz's contention that scholarship has obscured the fact that often these writers were quite critical of masculinity. Writing with a clarity and scope that allows him to both invoke the Schwarzeneggarian "girly man" and borrow from the theories of Judith Butler and Bertolt Brecht, he fashions a critical method with which to explore the ways in which scholars gender texts by the very act of reading.
Main Description
InDangerous Masculinities,Thomas Strychacz has as his goal nothing less than to turn scholarship on gender and modernism on its head. He focuses on the way some early twentieth-century writers portray masculinity as theatrical performance, and examines why scholars have generally overlooked that fact. Strychacz argues that writers such as Conrad, Hemingway, and Lawrence--often viewed as misogynist--actually represented masculinity in their works in terms of theatrical and rhetorical performances. They are theatrical in the sense that male characters keep staging themselves in competitive displays; rhetorical in the sense that these characters, and the very narrative form of the works in which they appear, render masculinity a kind of persuasive argument readers can and should debate. Perhaps most interesting is Strychacz's contention that scholarship has obscured the fact that often these writers were quite critical of masculinity. Writing with a clarity and scope that allows him to both invoke the Schwarzeneggarian "girly man" and borrow from the theories of Judith Butler and Bertolt Brecht, he fashions a critical method with which to explore the ways in which scholars gender texts by the very act of reading.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Masculinity Studies, Professionalism, and the Rhetoric of Genderp. 14
Making a Mess of Manhood in Hemingway's "The Capital of the World"p. 48
The Construction of Hemingway: Masculine Style and Style-less Masculinityp. 73
"Looking at Another Man's Work": Theaters of Masculinity in Conrad's Lord Jimp. 104
"Show[ing] Himself as a Man": Constructions of Manhood in Conrad's Imperial Theaterp. 128
Leaving Our Sureties Behind: Lawrence's Rhetorical Play with Gender Rolesp. 159
Doing a Double Take: Reading Gender Issues in Women in Lovep. 177
Conclusion: Lawrence, Positionality, and the Prospects for New Masculinity Studiesp. 208
Notesp. 223
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 255
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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