Catalogue


The challenge of blackness [electronic resource] : the Institute of the Black World and political activism in the 1970s /
Derrick E. White ; foreword by Stanley Harrold and Randall M. Miller.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
description
xix, 260 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813037352 (alk. paper), 9780813037356 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
isbn
0813037352 (alk. paper)
9780813037356 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The challenge of blackness : the IBW and the Black studies movement -- Liberated grounds : the IBW's independence and reorganization -- Toward a Black agenda : the IBW and a Black political agenda for the seventies -- Collective scholarship : developing and promoting synthetic analyses -- The tapes were the heart of the matter : the IBW's infiltration and decline.
catalogue key
8440774
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Derrick E. White is associate professor of history at Florida Atlantic University and contributor to "We Shall Independent Be": African American Place-Making and the Struggle to Claim Space in the United States.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-06-01:
White's solid, scholarly account gives a definitive story of one of the paths taken in the struggle for rights and opportunities for African Americans. The Institute of the Black World, originally the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, was an effort led by Vincent Harding to synthesize a theoretical basis that would be common to the entire black struggle, defend its rationale, and support its protest advocates. Formally announced in 1970 and nested in the historically black Atlanta universities, the institute was affiliated with the emerging Martin Luther King Center until its service to political and economic protesters separated it from the civil disobedience commitments of the King Center. The institute's advocacy of common themes and evolution as a think tank on racial issues brought together leading black intellectuals in search of a theoretical construct--an intellectual synthesis. Finding a unifying political economic theory was a daunting and perhaps impossible task. Faced with diminished funding, the rise of cultural pluralism, the international assertions of Marxism, and the rise of a black middle class that was increasingly involved in the US mainstream, the institute lost potency and by 1975 survived primarily as a resource center. An important story of southern and black intellectualism. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. J. H. Smith Wake Forest University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, December 2011
Choice, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
“White poignantly chronicles the rise and fall of the Institute of the Black World and assesses its role as progenitor of radical scholarship, Black Studies, and the African Diaspora. Written in provocative yet accessible prose, this book is sure to spark debate on the intense relationship between Black Power, Marxism, and anticolonial politics during the long seventies.”-Paul Ortiz, University of Florida “This important book discusses the challenges faced by a visionary organization as it struggled with the turbulent 1970s. An excellent contribution to Black Power Studies and social movement research.”-Fabio Rojas, University of Indiana The Challenge of Blacknessexamines the history and legacy of the Institute of the Black World (IBW), one of the most important Black Freedom Struggle organizations to emerge in the aftermath of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. A think tank based in Atlanta, the IBW sought to answer King’s question “Where do we go from here?” Its solution was to organize a broad array of leading Black activists, scholars, and intellectuals to find ways to combine the emerging academic discipline of Black Studies with the Black political agenda. Throughout the 1970s, debates over race and class in the Unites States grew increasingly hostile, and the IBW’s approach was ultimately unable to challenge the growing conservatism. By using the IBW as the lens through which to view these turbulent years, Derrick White provides an exciting new interpretation of the immediate post–civil rights years in America. Derrick E. Whiteis associate professor of history at Florida Atlantic University and contributor to “We Shall Independent Be”: African American Place-Making and the Struggle to Claim Space in the United States. A volume in the series Southern Dissent, edited by Stanley Harrold and Randall M. Miller
Main Description
The Challenge of Blacknessexamines the history and legacy of the Institute of the Black World (IBW), one of the most important Black Freedom Struggle organizations to emerge in the aftermath of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. A think tank based in Atlanta, the IBW sought to answer King's question "Where do we go from here?" Its solution was to organize a broad array of leading Black activists, scholars, and intellectuals to find ways to combine the emerging academic discipline of Black Studies with the Black political agenda. Throughout the 1970s, debates over race and class in the Unites States grew increasingly hostile, and the IBW's approach was ultimately unable to challenge the growing conservatism. By using the IBW as the lens through which to view these turbulent years, Derrick White provides an exciting new interpretation of the immediate post-civil rights years in America.
Main Description
A Think Tank based in Atlanta, the Institute of the Black World sought to answer Martin Luther King Jr.'s question "Where do we go from here?" Its pragmatic solution was to organize a broad array of leading Black activists, scholars, and intellectuals to develop academic, political, and cultural strategies designed to expand the Black Freedom Struggle into a new decade.
Description for Bookstore
"White poignantly chronicles the rise and fall of the Institute of the Black World and assesses its role as progenitor of radical scholarship, Black Studies, and the African Diaspora. Written in provocative yet accessible prose, this book is sure to spark debate on the intense relationship between Black Power, Marxism, and anticolonial politics during the long seventies."-Paul Ortiz, University of Florida "This important book discusses the challenges faced by a visionary organization as it struggled with the turbulent 1970s. An excellent contribution to Black Power Studies and social movement research."-Fabio Rojas, University of Indiana The Challenge of Blacknessexamines the history and legacy of the Institute of the Black World (IBW), one of the most important Black Freedom Struggle organizations to emerge in the aftermath of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. A think tank based in Atlanta, the IBW sought to answer King's question "Where do we go from here?" Its solution was to organize a broad array of leading Black activists, scholars, and intellectuals to find ways to combine the emerging academic discipline of Black Studies with the Black political agenda. Throughout the 1970s, debates over race and class in the Unites States grew increasingly hostile, and the IBW's approach was ultimately unable to challenge the growing conservatism. By using the IBW as the lens through which to view these turbulent years, Derrick White provides an exciting new interpretation of the immediate postcivil rights years in America. Derrick E. Whiteis associate professor of history at Florida Atlantic University and contributor to "We Shall Independent Be": African American Place-Making and the Struggle to Claim Space in the United States. A volume in the series Southern Dissent, edited by Stanley Harrold and Randall M. Miller
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title examines the history and legacy of the Institute of the Black World, one of the most important black freedom struggle organizations to emerge in the aftermath of the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Forewordp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Introduction. Where Do We Go from Here?: The Long Seventiesp. 1
"The Challenge of Blackness": The IBW and the Black Studies Movementp. 19
"Liberated Grounds": The IBW's Independence and Reorganizationp. 59
"Toward a Black Agenda": The IBW and a Black Political Agenda for the Seventiesp. 102
"Collective Scholarship": Developing and Promoting Synthetic Analysesp. 136
"The Tapes Were the Heart of the Matter": The IBW's Infiltration and Declinep. 166
Epilogue: The IBW's Closing and Legacyp. 192
Appendix: IBW Membership, Conferences, and Symposium Listsp. 203
Notesp. 213
Bibliographyp. 241
Indexp. 255
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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