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Bridging race divides [electronic resource] : Black nationalism, feminism, and integration in the United States, 1896-1935 /
Kate Dossett.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2008.
description
xvi, 268 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813031400 (alk. paper), 9780813031408 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2008.
isbn
0813031400 (alk. paper)
9780813031408 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8440704
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [241]-256) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-02-01:
Dossett (Univ. of Leeds) covers new ground in understanding the tensions inherent in the struggles of African American women to seek and use power, and the choices they made to work within the black community in the early 20th century. The author shows black women facing not only the racism of white women in the hierarchy of the YWCA, but also the tyranny of black men who discounted their contributions to wholly black organizations such as the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). Drawing her examples from clubwomen, businesswomen, and activists, Dossett reveals the women's skillful reframing of race- and gender-based challenges into opportunities to secure funding and control of race uplift programs. The book complements Martha S. Jones, All Bound Up Together (CH, Aug'08, 45-6984), which focuses on churchwomen, and provides a less rosy perspective of race relations in New York City during this period than John L. Recchiuti's Civic Engagement (CH, Sep'07, 45-0576). Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. L. Patrick Florida State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Bridging Race Divides breaks new ground in African American and women's history by challenging assumptions about African American women's relationship to black nationalist movements in the United States"
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
" Bridging Race Dividesbreaks new ground in African American and women's history by challenging assumptions about African American women's relationship to black nationalist movements in the United States"--Sarah Judson, University of North Carolina, Asheville African American women in the early-twentieth century made significant contributions toward the development of a black feminist tradition, were at the forefront of black nationalism, and challenged the apparent dichotomy between black nationalism and integrationism. Kate Dossett examines the political thought and cultural production of prominent black women leaders in the years between the founding of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896 and the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. By featuring the contributions of women like the pioneering black hairdresser, Madam C. J. Walker, and her daughter, as well as club woman Mary McLeod Bethune and United Negro Improvement Association activist Amy Jacques Garvey, Dossett also makes a distinctive contribution to the field of women's history by challenging the reverse class bias that has meant that middle-class women have been deemed less worthy of study, or worse, dubbed assimilationist and accused of lacking race pride. While revealing the depth and complexity of black women's thought in the early twentieth century, and highlighting their contribution to a black feminist tradition of activism, Bridging Race Dividespositions black women at the forefront of both intellectual and practical endeavors in the struggle for black autonomy.
Description for Bookstore
" Bridging Race Dividesbreaks new ground in African American and women’s history by challenging assumptions about African American women’s relationship to black nationalist movements in the United States"--Sarah Judson, University of North Carolina, Asheville African American women in the early-twentieth century made significant contributions toward the development of a black feminist tradition, were at the forefront of black nationalism, and challenged the apparent dichotomy between black nationalism and integrationism. Kate Dossett examines the political thought and cultural production of prominent black women leaders in the years between the founding of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896 and the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. By featuring the contributions of women like the pioneering black hairdresser, Madam C. J. Walker, and her daughter, as well as club woman Mary McLeod Bethune and United Negro Improvement Association activist Amy Jacques Garvey, Dossett also makes a distinctive contribution to the field of women’s history by challenging the reverse class bias that has meant that middle-class women have been deemed less worthy of study, or worse, dubbed assimilationist and accused of lacking race pride. While revealing the depth and complexity of black women's thought in the early twentieth century, and highlighting their contribution to a black feminist tradition of activism, Bridging Race Dividespositions black women at the forefront of both intellectual and practical endeavors in the struggle for black autonomy.
Description for Bookstore
"Bridging Race Dividesbreaks new ground in African American and women's history by challenging assumptions about African American women's relationship to black nationalist movements in the United States"--Sarah Judson, University of North Carolina, Asheville African American women in the early-twentieth century made significant contributions toward the development of a black feminist tradition, were at the forefront of black nationalism, and challenged the apparent dichotomy between black nationalism and integrationism. Kate Dossett examines the political thought and cultural production of prominent black women leaders in the years between the founding of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896 and the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. By featuring the contributions of women like the pioneering black hairdresser, Madam C. J. Walker, and her daughter, as well as club woman Mary McLeod Bethune and United Negro Improvement Association activist Amy Jacques Garvey, Dossett also makes a distinctive contribution to the field of women's history by challenging the reverse class bias that has meant that middle-class women have been deemed less worthy of study, or worse, dubbed assimilationist and accused of lacking race pride. While revealing the depth and complexity of black women's thought in the early twentieth century, and highlighting their contribution to a black feminist tradition of activism,Bridging Race Dividespositions black women at the forefront of both intellectual and practical endeavors in the struggle for black autonomy.
Long Description
African American women in the early-twentieth century made significant contributions toward the development of a black feminist tradition, were at the forefront of black nationalism, and challenged the apparent dichotomy between black nationalism and integrationism. Kate Dossett examines the political thought and cultural production of prominent black women leaders in the years between the founding of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896 and the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. By featuring the contributions of women like the pioneering black hairdresser, Madam C. J. Walker, and her daughter, as well as club woman Mary McLeod Bethune and United Negro Improvement Association activist Amy Jacques Garvey, Dossett also makes a distinctive contribution to the field of women's history by challenging the reverse class bias that has meant that middle-class women have been deemed less worthy of study, or worse, dubbed assimilationist and accused of lacking race pride. While revealing the depth and complexity of black women's thought in the early twentieth century and highlighting their contribution to a black feminist tradition of activism, Bridging Race Divides positions black women at the forefront of both intellectual and practical endeavors in the struggle for black autonomy.
Main Description
African American women in the early-twentieth century made significant contributions toward the development of a black feminist tradition, were at the forefront of black nationalism, and challenged the apparent dichotomy between black nationalism and integrationism. Kate Dossett examines the political thought and cultural production of prominent black women leaders in the years between the founding of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896 and the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. By featuring the contributions of women like the pioneering black hairdresser, Madam C. J. Walker, and her daughter, as well as club woman Mary McLeod Bethune and United Negro Improvement Association activist Amy Jacques Garvey, Dossett also makes a distinctive contribution to the field of women's history by challenging the reverse class bias that has meant that middle-class women have been deemed less worthy of study, or worse, dubbed assimilationist and accused of lacking race pride. While revealing the depth and complexity of black women's thought in the early twentieth century, and highlighting their contribution to a black feminist tradition of activism,Bridging Race Dividespositions black women at the forefront of both intellectual and practical endeavors in the struggle for black autonomy.
Main Description
African American women in the early-twentieth century made significant contributions toward the development of a black feminist tradition, were at the forefront of black nationalism, and challenged the apparent dichotomy between black nationalism and integrationism. Kate Dossett examines the political thought and cultural production of prominent black women leaders in the years between the founding of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896 and the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. By featuring the contributions of women like the pioneering black hairdresser, Madam C. J. Walker, and her daughter, as well as club woman Mary McLeod Bethune and United Negro Improvement Association activist Amy Jacques Garvey, Dossett also makes a distinctive contribution to the field of women’s history by challenging the reverse class bias that has meant that middle-class women have been deemed less worthy of study, or worse, dubbed assimilationist and accused of lacking race pride. While revealing the depth and complexity of black women's thought in the early twentieth century, and highlighting their contribution to a black feminist tradition of activism, Bridging Race Dividespositions black women at the forefront of both intellectual and practical endeavors in the struggle for black autonomy.
Main Description
High-profile rivalries between black male leaders in the early twentieth century have contributed to the view that integrationism and black nationalism were diametrically opposed philosophies shaped primarily by men. Bridging Race Divides challenges this conceptualization by examining prominent "race women" (including Amy Jacques Garvey, Mary McLeod Bethune, Madam C.J. Walker) as well as other participants in the Harlem Renaissance, Garveyism, and the clubwomen's movement to reveal the depth and complexity of women's contributions to both black feminist and black nationalist traditions of activism in the early twentieth century. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Prefacep. xi
List of Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Laying the Groundwork: Washington, Burroughs, Bethune, and the Clubwomen's Movementp. 15
Black Nationalism and Interracialism in the Young Women's Christian Associationp. 66
Luxuriant Growth: The Walkers and Black Economic Nationalismp. 107
Amy Jacques Garvey, Jessie Fauset, and Pan-African Feminist Thoughtp. 150
Epiloguep. 200
Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 241
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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