Catalogue


The British Film Institute, the government and film culture, 1933-2000 /
edited by Geoffrey Nowell-Smith and Christophe Dupin.
imprint
Manchester [U.K.] ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the United States exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xvi, 331 p. : ill., ports ; 24 cm.
ISBN
071907908X (hbk.), 9780719079085 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester [U.K.] ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the United States exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
071907908X (hbk.)
9780719079085 (hbk.)
abstract
The British Film Institute (BFI) is one of the UK's oldest and most important government-supported cultural institutions. From a modest start in the 1930s it grew rapidly after the war to encompass every kind of film-related activity from production to archiving to exhibition to education. At the beginning of the twenty-first century its turnover was approaching GBP30m and it had become a central point of reference for anyone whose interest in film stretched beyond what's on at the local multiplex. There was nothing straightforward about this rise to prominence. It was achieved in the face of government indifference, active obstruction from the film trade, internecine warfare within the organisation and fierce contestation on the part of the BFI's own core public. Based on intensive original research in the BFI's own voluminous archives and elsewhere, this book examines the interplay of external and internal forces that led to the BFI's unique development as a multi-faceted public body.
catalogue key
8434789
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [310]-318) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Geoffrey Nowell-Smith is an Honorary Professorial Fellow in the School of History, Queen Mary, University of London Christophe Dupin is Senior Administrator at the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF) in Brussels
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The book is wide ranging in scope, covering not only the BFI, but 75 years of British cultural life, including film societies, the film archive movement and the Museum of the Moving Image."
"This volume will be a treasure trove for anyone interested in film and the workings of cultural institutions, or more generally in 20th century British film history."
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The British Film Institute (BFI) is one of the UK's oldest and most important government-supported cultural institutions. From a modest start in the 1930s it grew rapidly after the war to encompass every kind of film-related activity from production to archiving to exhibition to education. At the beginning of the twenty-first century its turnover was approaching 30m and it had become a central point of reference for anyone whose interest in film stretched beyond what's on at the local multiplex. There was nothing straightforward about this rise to prominence. It was achieved in the face of government indifference, active obstruction from the film trade, internecine warfare within the organization and fierce contestation on the part of the BFI's own core public. Based on intensive original research in the BFI's own voluminous archives and elsewhere, this book examines the interplay of external and internal forces that led to the BFI's unique development as a multi-faceted public body. This volume will be a treasure trove for anyone interested in film and the workings of cultural institutions, or more generally in twentieth century British film history.
Main Description
The British Film Institute (BFI) is one of the UK's oldest and most important government-supported cultural institutions. From a modest start in the 1930s it grew rapidly after the war to encompass every kind of film-related activity from production to archiving to exhibition to education. At the beginning of the twenty-first century its turnover was approaching £30m and it had become a central point of reference for anyone whose interest in film stretched beyond what's on at the local multiplex. There was nothing straightforward about this rise to prominence. It was achieved in the face of government indifference, active obstruction from the film trade, internecine warfare within the organization and fierce contestation on the part of the BFI's own core public. Based on intensive original research in the BFI's own voluminous archives and elsewhere, this book examines the interplay of external and internal forces that led to the BFI's unique development as a multi-faceted public body. This volume will be a treasure trove for anyone interested in film and the workings of cultural institutions, or more generally in twentieth century British film history.
Main Description
The British Film Institute (BFI) is one of the UK's oldest and most important government-supported cultural institutions. From a modest start in the 1930s it grew rapidly after the war to encompass every kind of film-related activity from production to archiving to exhibition to education. At the beginning of the twenty-first century its turnover was approaching 30m and it had become a central point of reference for anyone whose interest in film stretched beyond what's on at the local multiplex.There was nothing straightforward about this rise to prominence. It was achieved in the face of government indifference, active obstruction from the film trade, internecine warfare within the organisation and fierce contestation on the part of the BFI's own core public.Based on intensive original research in the BFI's own voluminous archives and elsewhere, this book examines the interplay of external and internal forces that led to the BFI's unique development as a multi-faceted public body. This volume will be a treasure trove for anyone interested in film and the workings of cultural institutions, or more generally in twentieth century British film history.
Main Description
The British Film Institute (BFI) is one of the UK's oldest and most important government-supported cultural institutions. From a modest start in the 1930s it grew rapidly after the war to encompass every kind of film-related activity from production to archiving to exhibition to education. At the beginning of the twenty-first century its turnover was approaching £30m and it had become a central point of reference for anyone whose interest in film stretched beyond what's on at the local multiplex.There was nothing straightforward about this rise to prominence. It was achieved in the face of government indifference, active obstruction from the film trade, internecine warfare within the organisation and fierce contestation on the part of the BFI's own core public.Based on intensive original research in the BFI's own voluminous archives and elsewhere, this book examines the interplay of external and internal forces that led to the BFI's unique development as a multi-faceted public body. This volume will be a treasure trove for anyone interested in film and the workings of cultural institutions, or more generally in twentieth century British film history.
Main Description
The British Film Institute (BFI) is one of the UK#146;s oldest and most important government-supported cultural institutions. From a modest start in the 1930s it grew rapidly after the war to encompass every kind of film-related activity from production to archiving to exhibition to education. At the beginning of the twenty-first century its turnover was approaching £30m and it had become a central point of reference for anyone whose interest in film stretched beyond what#146;s on at the local multiplex. There was nothing straightforward about this rise to prominence. It was achieved in the face of government indifference, active obstruction from the film trade, internecine warfare within the organisation and fierce contestation on the part of the BFI#146;s own core public. Based on intensive original research in the BFI#146;s own voluminous archives and elsewhere, this book examines the interplay of external and internal forces that led to the BFI#146;s unique development as a multi-faceted public body. This volume will be a treasure trove for anyone interested in film and the workings of cultural institutions, or more generally in twentieth century British film history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From a modest start in the 1930s, the British Film Institute (BFI) grew rapidly after the war to encompass every kind of film-related activity. This book examines the interplay of external and internal forces that led to the BFI's unique development as a multi-faceted public body.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. vii
Notes on contributorsp. xi
Forewordp. xiii
List of abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Foundation and early yearsp. 14
Postwar renaissancep. 30
'Je t'aime ... moi non plus': Ernest Lindgren and Henri Langlois pioneers of the film archive movementp. 46
The BFI and film exhibition, 1933-1970p. 69
The vanguard of film appreciation: the film society movement and film culture, 1945-1965p. 87
From the 1964 Labour government to the 1970 BFI crisisp. 102
The view from outside Londonp. 116
Paddy Whannel and BFI Educationp. 133
The 1970sp. 152
The Smith yearsp. 179
The BFI and film production: half a century of innovative independent film-makingp. 197
The BFI and televisionp. 219
The Sight and Sound story, 1932-1992p. 237
A public showcase for the BFI: the Museum of the Moving Imagep. 252
Towards the millenniump. 272
Epilogue: 2011p. 304
Select bibliographyp. 310
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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