Catalogue


Youth identities and Argentine popular music : beyond tango /
edited by Pablo Semán and Pablo Vila.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York, : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
191 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230104630 (hbk : alk. paper), 9780230104631 (hbk : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230104630 (hbk : alk. paper)
9780230104631 (hbk : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8434688
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-183) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Pablo Semn is a researcher and professor of Sociology and Anthropology. He has developed his career in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. His research focuses on the production and reception of popular and mass music, religion, and literature. He has published several scientific articles in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, France, the United States, and Mexico. He has published, among other books: Entre Santos, Cumbiasy Piquetes (with Daniel Mguez, 2006); Bajo Continuo: Exploraciones descentradassobre cultura popular y masiva (2006); Cumbia: Raza, nacin, etnia y gnero en Latinoamrica (with Pablo Vila, 2011); and Troubling Gender: Youth and Cumbia in Argentina's Music Scene (with Pablo Vila, 2011). Pablo Vila is a professor of Sociology at Temple University. His research focuses on the social construction of identities in two different locales, the US-Mexico border and Argentina. On the US-Mexico border, he has researched issues of national, regional, racial, ethnic, religious, gender, and class identities. His publications include: Crossing Borders, Reinforcing Borders: Social Categories, Metaphors, and Narrative Identities on the US-Mexico Frontier; Border Identifications: Narratives of Religion, Gender, and Class on the US-Mexico Border; Ethnography at the Border, Identificaciones de regin, etniay nation en la frontera entre Mxico-EU. In his work on identification processes in Argentina he has researched the way in which different social actors use popular music to understand who they are and act accordingly. This part of his research has resulted in several articles and four books: Cumbia: Raza, nacin, etnia y gnero en Latinoamrica (with Pablo Seman, 2011), Troubling Genden: Youth and Cumbia in Argentina's Music Scene (with Pablo Semn, 2011), and Cumbia! (with Hctor Fernndez L'Hoeste, 2012).
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An intriguing exploration of multiple conjunctures and disjunctures in the unpredictable relationships between identity and music, the chapters in this volume consistently surprise the reader by demonstrating how endless innovation and creativity produce unexpected musical fusions, which nevertheless 'make sense' when seen in retrospect and from the point of view of the music-makers and their audiences." - Peter Wade, author of Music, Race and Nation: Música Tropical in Colombia
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
What are the main music preferences of young people in Argentina? How do these preferences fit into Argentinean society, culture, and politics? The essays in this volume show how issues of religion, class, ethnicity, and gender are constructed and negotiated through a variety of musical practices. Rock, cumbia, and romantic music are all examined as elaborations of gender, sexual, class, and ethnic identities for young people, whose socio-musical lives go beyond the traditional stereotypes ofArgentina, tango, and passion.
Main Description
What are the main music preferences among the youth in Argentina? How do these preferences fit into Argentinean society, culture, and politics? The essays in this volume show how religion, class, ethnic, and gender issues in Argentina are constructed and negotiated through a variety of musical practices. Rock,cumbia, and romantic music elaborate gender, sexual, class, and ethnic identities for young people, whose socio-musical life goes beyond the traditional stereotypes of Argentina, tango, and passion.
Main Description
What are the main music preferences among the youth in Argentina? How do these preferences fit into Argentine society, culture, and politics? The essays in this volume show how religion, class, ethnic, generational, and gender issues in Argentina are constructed and negotiated through a variety of musical practices. Rock,cumbia, and romantic music articulate gender, sexual, class, and ethnic identities for young people, whose socio-musical life goes beyond the traditional stereotypes of Argentina, tango, and passion.
Main Description
What are the main music preferences among the youth in Argentina? How do these preferences fit into Argentinean society, culture, and politics? The essays in this volume show how religion, class, ethnic, and gender issues in Argentina are constructed and negotiated through a variety of musical practices. Rock, cumbia, and romantic music elaborate gender, sexual, class, and ethnic identities for young people, whose socio-musical life goes beyond the traditional stereotypes of Argentina, tango, and passion.
Main Description
What are the main music preferences of young people in Argentina? How do these preferences fit into Argentinean society, culture, and politics? The essays in this volume show how issues of religion, class, ethnicity, and gender are constructed and negotiated through a variety of musical practices. Rock, cumbia, and romantic music are all examined as elaborations of gender, sexual, class, and ethnic identities for young people, whose socio-musical lives go beyond the traditional stereotypes of Argentina, tango, and passion.
Main Description
This book analyzes the music that young porte as/os (the inhabitants of Buenos Aires, Argentina) actually listen to nowadays, which, contrary to well-entrenched stereotypes, is not tango but rock nacional , cumbia and romantic music, genres that are the object of this collection of essays.
Long Description
This book is about the music that young porteñas/os (the inhabitants of Buenos Aires, Argentina) actually listen to nowadays. Departing from a well entrenched stereotype that equates Buenos Aires with tango, this collection of essays shows that few native Argentines listen to this musical genre on a daily basis, and even fewer dance tango. Based on extensive field work individual chapters address the ways in which cumbia , rock nacional , and romantic music provide young people from different social sectors with both enjoyment and the tools they use for understanding who they are in the aftermath of the traumatic neoliberal experience that brought the country to near total collapse in the early days of the present century. Written from the perspective of the long tradition of sociology and anthropology of music most of the articles use ethnography and content analysis as methods of inquiry. Because there is a huge gap in the market (to date no academically reliable book exists on Argentine popular music, with the exception of those dealing with the fashionable topic of tango) this book will appeal to a quite wide audience. On the one hand to those professors who teach undergraduate and graduate courses on Latin American culture, Latin American music, and sociology and anthropology of music. At the same time the book will appeal to those scholars who do research on those areas. A general audience interested in music, Latin American culture and society will be interested as well because while the chapters are clearly academically oriented they are easy to read.
Description for Bookstore
This book analyzes the music that young porte as/os (the inhabitants of Buenos Aires, Argentina) actually listen to nowadays, which, contrary to well-entrenched stereotypes, is not tango
Description for Bookstore
This book analyzes the music that young porteñas/os (the inhabitants of Buenos Aires, Argentina) actually listen to nowadays, which, contrary to well-entrenched stereotypes, is not tango
Long Description
This book is about the music that young porte as/os (the inhabitants of Buenos Aires, Argentina) actually listen to nowadays. Departing from a well entrenched stereotype that equates Buenos Aires with tango, this collection of essays shows that few native Argentines listen to this musical genre on a daily basis, and even fewer dance tango. Based on extensive field work individual chapters address the ways in which cumbia , rock nacional , and romantic music provide young people from different social sectors with both enjoyment and the tools they use for understanding who they are in the aftermath of the traumatic neoliberal experience that brought the country to near total collapse in the early days of the present century. Written from the perspective of the long tradition of sociology and anthropology of music most of the articles use ethnography and content analysis as methods of inquiry. Because there is a huge gap in the market (to date no academically reliable book exists on Argentine popular music, with the exception of those dealing with the fashionable topic of tango) this book will appeal to a quite wide audience. On the one hand to those professors who teach undergraduate and graduate courses on Latin American culture, Latin American music, and sociology and anthropology of music. At the same time the book will appeal to those scholars who do research on those areas. A general audience interested in music, Latin American culture and society will be interested as well because while the chapters are clearly academically oriented they are easy to read.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book analyzes the music that young porteÞas/os (the inhabitants of Buenos Aires, Argentina) actually listen to nowadays, which, contrary to well-entrenched stereotypes, is not tango but rock nacional, cumbia and romantic music.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Ritual Transgression and Grotesque Realism in 1990s Rock Music: An Ethnographer among the Bersuitp. 19
"Rockers" Moral Limits in the Construction of Musical Communitiesp. 41
Cumbia Villera and the End of the Culture of Work in Argentina in the 90sp. 59
Cumbia and Latin-American Migration in Buenos Aires, Argentina: Identity Negotiation Processes in Two Ethnic/National Dance Hallsp. 83
Cumbia Villera or the Complex Construction of Masculinity and Femininity in Contemporary Argentinap. 101
Catholic Inflections and Female Complicities: Syncretism in a "Fan Club" in Buenos Airesp. 125
Pleasurable Surfaces: Sex, Religion, and Electronic Music within the 1990-2010 Transition Foldsp. 141
"RESCATE" and Its Consequences: Culture and Religion as a Single Entityp. 159
Notes on Contributorsp. 175
Referencesp. 177
Indexp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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