Catalogue


Engaging Bach : the keyboard legacy from Marpurg to Mendelssohn /
Matthew Dirst.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
xiii, 186 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0521651603 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780521651608 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
0521651603 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780521651608 (hardback : alk. paper)
contents note
Part I. The posthumous reassessment of selected works. Why the keyboard works? ; Inventing the Bach chorale ; What Mozart learned from Bach -- Part II. Divergent streams of reception in the early nineteenth century ; A bürgerlicher Bach : turn-of-the-century German advocacy ; The virtuous fugue : English reception to 1840 ; Bach for whom? Modes of interpretation and performance, 1820-1850.
catalogue key
8433614
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 172-182) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This concise volume is a welcome and valuable addition to the burgeoning genre of Bach reception literature, as well as to the numerous recent studies concerned with German musical aesthetics in the 18th and 19th centuries." --Early Music America
'This concise volume is a welcome and valuable addition to the burgeoning genre of Bach reception literature.' Early Music America
'Dirst, a performer himself, is a lively writer and makes many useful observations.' Times Literary Supplement
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Matthew Dirst presents a wide-ranging historical explanation of J.S. Bach's keyboard works. Closely examining the most important ideas this music has inspired, Dirst explores the significance, influence and reception of canonic works including 'The Well-Tempered Clavier' during the 18th and early 19th centuries.
Description for Bookstore
Matthew Dirst presents a wide-ranging historical explanation of J. S. Bach's keyboard works. Closely examining the most important ideas this music has inspired, Dirst explores the significance, influence and reception of canonic works including The Well-Tempered Clavier during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Main Description
More than any other part of Bach's output, his keyboard works conveyed the essence of his inimitable art to generations of admirers. The varied responses to this repertory – in scholarly and popular writing, public lectures, musical composition and transcription, performances and editions – ensured its place in the canon and broadened its creator's appeal. The early reception of Bach's keyboard music also continues to affect how we understand and value it, though we rarely recognize that historical continuity. Here, Matthew Dirst investigates how Bach's music intersects with cultural, social and music history, focusing on a repertory which is often overshadowed in scholarly and popular literature on Bach reception. Organized around the most productive ideas generated by Bach's keyboard works from his own day to the middle of the nineteenth century, this study shows how Bach's remarkable and long-lasting legacy took shape amid critical changes in European musical thought and practice.
Table of Contents
Why the keyboard works?
Inventing the Bach chorale
What Mozart learned from Bach
A bürgerlicher Bach: turn-of-the-century German advocacy
The virtuous fugue: English reception to 1840
Bach for whom? Modes of interpretation and performance, 1820âÇô1850
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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