Catalogue


The historic unfullfilled promise /
Howard Zinn ; introduction by Mathew Rothschild.
imprint
San Francisco, CA : City Lights Books, 2012.
description
250 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
087286555X, 9780872865556
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
San Francisco, CA : City Lights Books, 2012.
isbn
087286555X
9780872865556
general note
Includes index.
Zinn's feature articles penned for the Progressive from 1980 to 2009.
catalogue key
8433090
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-04-23:
This posthumous collection of Zinn's passionate, iconoclastic, and wryly humorous articles from the Progressive magazine spans 30 years-from 1980 to 2010-though most are of 21st-century vintage. Zinn argues repeatedly for an alternative to war, totalitarianism, and redistribution of resources and energy away from the military and "toward ideals of egalitarianism, community, and self-determination... which have been the historic, unfulfilled promise of the word democracy." Zinn (A People's History of the United States) persists with his optimism and sometimes proves astounding in his almost clairvoyant analysis, as the essays progress from Boston University student and faculty protests against the Vietnam War and the academic "Establishment" through the two Iraq wars, to Obama's expansion of the war in Afghanistan. In addition, Zinn writes of his own youth and radicalization, and his admiration for artists who "wage the battle of justice in a sphere which is unreachable by the dullness of ordinary political discourse," including a warm and perceptive memorial to Kurt Vonnegut, with whom he became friends late in life, and with whom he shared a conversion to pacifism after serving in WWII. His call to action will strike a chord with a younger generation of occupiers. Agent: The Ward & Balkin Agency. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A useful introduction to one of America's great scholar-activists."-- Kirkus Reviews "Howard Zinn's life and work are an unforgettable model, sure to leave a permanent stamp on how history is understood and how a decent and honorable life should be lived." --Noam Chomsky "Proudly, unabashedly radical . . . Mr. Zinn delighted in debating ideological foes, not the least his own college president, and in lancing what he considered platitudes, not the least that American history was a heroic march toward democracy." --New York Times "For Howard, democracy was one big public fight and everyone should plunge into it. That's the only way, he said, for everyday folks to get justic--by fighting for it." --Bill Moyers
"A useful introduction to one of America's great scholar-activists."-- Kirkus Reviews "This posthumous collection of Zinn's passionate, iconoclastic, and wryly humorous articles from the Progressive magazine spans 30 years--from 1980 to 2010--though most are of 21st-century vintage. Zinn argues repeatedly for an alternative to war, totalitarianism, and redistribution of resources and energy away from the military and "toward ideals of egalitarianism, community, and self-determination... which have been the historic, unfulfilled promise of the word democracy." Zinn persists with his optimism and sometimes proves astounding in his almost clairvoyant analysis, as the essays progress from Boston University student and faculty protests against the Vietnam War and the academic "Establishment" through the two Iraq wars, to Obama's expansion of the war in Afghanistan. In addition, Zinn writes of his own youth and radicalization, and his admiration for artists who "wage the battle of justice in a sphere which is unreachable by the dullness of ordinary political discourse," including a warm and perceptive memorial to Kurt Vonnegut, with whom he became friends late in life, and with whom he shared a conversion to pacifism after serving in WWII. His call to action will strike a chord with a younger generation of occupiers." --Starred review in Publisher's Weekly
This posthumous collection of Zinn's passionate, iconoclastic, and wryly humorous articles from the Progressive magazine spans 30 years--from 1980 to 2010--though most are of 21st-century vintage. Zinn argues repeatedly for an alternative to war, totalitarianism, and redistribution of resources and energy away from the military and "toward ideals of egalitarianism, community, and self-determination... which have been the historic, unfulfilled promise of the word democracy." Zinn persists with his optimism and sometimes proves astounding in his almost clairvoyant analysis, as the essays progress from Boston University student and faculty protests against the Vietnam War and the academic "Establishment" through the two Iraq wars, to Obama's expansion of the war in Afghanistan. In addition, Zinn writes of his own youth and radicalization, and his admiration for artists who "wage the battle of justice in a sphere which is unreachable by the dullness of ordinary political discourse," including a warm and perceptive memorial to Kurt Vonnegut, with whom he became friends late in life, and with whom he shared a conversion to pacifism after serving in WWII. His call to action will strike a chord with a younger generation of occupiers. --Publisher's Weekly
"Both Zinn's critics and his fans (there are many of both) will not see any appreciable watering-down of his often contentious views on democracy and war, the two subjects most abundantly represented here. But here there is also an opportunity to see a side of Zinn that was often kept private. His 2007 essay, 'Remembering Kurt Vonnegut,' for example, eulogizes the acclaimed novelist with a rather touching personal statement of Zinn's own affection for him. A sharp and insightful collection from one of the country's most visible historians and critics."-- Booklist "Howard Zinn's life and work are an unforgettable model, sure to leave a permanent stamp on how history is understood and how a decent and honorable life should be lived." --Noam Chomsky "Proudly, unabashedly radical . . . Mr. Zinn delighted in debating ideological foes, not the least his own college president, and in lancing what he considered platitudes, not the least that American history was a heroic march toward democracy." --New York Times "For Howard, democracy was one big public fight and everyone should plunge into it. That's the only way, he said, for everyday folks to get justic--by fighting for it." --Bill Moyers
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, April 2012
Booklist, July 2012
Kirkus Reviews, August 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Howard Zinn's life and work are the stuff of legend. His People's History of the United States has sold over two million copies and has altered how we see and teach history. A hero in word and deed, Zinn's views on freedom, fairness, history, democracy, and our own human potential are educational and transformative. In few places is the genius of his voice more crystallized and accessible than in the dozens of articles he penned for The Progressive magazine from 1980 to 2009, offered together here in book form for the first time. Whether critiquing the Barack Obama White House, the sorry state of US government and politics, the tragic futility of US military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, or the plight of working people in an economy rigged to benefit the rich and powerful, Zinn's historical clarity, unflappable optimism, and unshakable questions reverberate throughout The Historic Unfulfilled Promise : "Have our political leaders gone mad?" "What kind of country do we want to live in?" "What is national security?" "Do we have a right to occupy a country when the people of that country obviously do not want us there?" "Is not war itself terrorism?" "Should we not begin to consider all children, everywhere, as our own?" "Has the will of the people been followed?" The Historic Unfulfilled Promise is a genuine work of conscience, rich in ideas, charged with energy; an invaluable introduction for the uninitiated and a must-have for Zinn's fans.
Main Description
"Passionate, iconoclastic, and wrly humorous . . . [Zinn] sometimes proves astounding in his almost clairvoyant analysis." --STARRED REVIEW, Publisher's Weekly Howard Zinn's life and work are the stuff of legend. His People's History of the United States has sold over two million copies and has altered how we see and teach history. A hero in word and deed, Zinn's views on freedom, fairness, history, democracy, and our own human potential are educational and transformative. In few places is the genius of his voice more crystallized and accessible than in the dozens of articles he penned for The Progressive magazine from 1980 to 2009, offered together here in book form for the first time. Whether critiquing the Barack Obama White House, the sorry state of US government and politics, the tragic futility of US military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, or the plight of working people in an economy rigged to benefit the rich and powerful, Zinn's historical clarity, unflappable optimism, and unshakable questions reverberate throughout The Historic Unfulfilled Promise : "Have our political leaders gone mad?" "What kind of country do we want to live in?" "What is national security?" "Do we have a right to occupy a country when the people of that country obviously do not want us there?" "Is not war itself terrorism?" "Should we not begin to consider all children, everywhere, as our own?" "Has the will of the people been followed?" The Historic Unfulfilled Promise is a genuine work of conscience, rich in ideas, charged with energy; an invaluable introduction for the uninitiated and a must-have for Zinn's fans.
Main Description
"Passionate, iconoclastic, and wrly humorous . . . [Zinn] sometimes proves astounding in his almost clairvoyant analysis." --Publisher's Weekly Starred Review Howard Zinn's life and work are the stuff of legend. His People's History of the United States has sold over two million copies and has altered how we see and teach history. A hero in word and deed, Zinn's views on freedom, fairness, history, democracy, and our own human potential are educational and transformative. In few places is the genius of his voice more crystallized and accessible than in the dozens of articles he penned for The Progressive magazine from 1980 to 2009, offered together here in book form for the first time. Whether critiquing the Barack Obama White House, the sorry state of US government and politics, the tragic futility of US military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, or the plight of working people in an economy rigged to benefit the rich and powerful, Zinn's historical clarity, unflappable optimism, and unshakable questions reverberate throughout The Historic Unfulfilled Promise : "Have our political leaders gone mad?" "What kind of country do we want to live in?" "What is national security?" "Do we have a right to occupy a country when the people of that country obviously do not want us there?" "Is not war itself terrorism?" "Should we not begin to consider all children, everywhere, as our own?" "Has the will of the people been followed?" The Historic Unfulfilled Promise is a genuine work of conscience, rich in ideas, charged with energy; an invaluable introduction for the uninitiated and a must-have for Zinn's fans.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 7
To Disagree Is to Be Put on the Enemies Listp. 13
A Murderous Wordp. 29
Organizing the Organizedp. 33
Outside the Classroom: Interview with David Barsamianp. 31
One Iraqi's Storyp. 53
A Diplomatic Solutionp. 51
Their Atrocities-and Oursp. 61
Delusion 2000: How the Candidates "View the Worldp. 69
One Radical Who Did It Allp. 15
Artists of Resistancep. 79
Operation Enduring Warp. 87
What War Looks Likep. 93
Our Job Is a Simple One: Stop Themp. 99
A Chorus against Warp. 103
Dying for the Governmentp. 111
Humpty Dumpty Will Fallp. 115
An Occupied Countryp. 121
The Logic of Withdrawalp. 129
Opposing the War Partyp. 139
What Do We Do Now?p. 147
Our War on Terrorismp. 153
Harness That Angerp. 159
Changing Minds, One at a Timep. 165
After the Warp. 173
Why War Failsp. 179
Impeachment by the Peoplep. 185
Are We Politicians or Citizens?p. 191
Kurt Vonnegut Rememberedp. 197
Election Madnessp. 203
The Obama Differencep. 209
The Nobel's Feeble Gesturep. 215
Three Holy Warsp. 221
They Rioted if Necessaryp. 229
Indexp. 239
About the Authorsp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem