Catalogue


The right and labor in America : politics, ideology, and imagination /
edited by Nelson Lichtenstein and Elizabeth Tandy Shermer.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012.
description
vii, 422 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0812244141 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780812244144 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012.
isbn
0812244141 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780812244144 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: entangled histories: American conservatism and the U.S. labor movement in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries / Nelson Lichtenstein and Elizabeth Tandy Shermer -- Unions, modernity, and the decline of American economic nationalism / Andrew Wender Cohen -- The American legion and striking workers during the interwar period / Christopher Nehls -- Democracy or seduction? The demonization of scientific management and the deification of human relations / Chris Nyland and Kyle Bruce -- Capital flight, "states' rights", and the anti-labor offensive after World War II / Tami J. Friedman -- Orval Faubus and the rise of anti-labor populism in northwestern Arkansas / Michael Pierce -- "Is freedom of the individual un-American?" Right-to-work campaigns and anti-union conservatism, 1943-1958 / Elizabeth Tandy Shermer -- Singing "the right-to-work blues": the politics of race in the campaign for "voluntary unionism" in postwar California / Reuel Schiller -- Whose rights? Litigating the right to work, 1940-1980 / Sophia A. Lee -- "Such power spells tyranny"" business opposition to administrative governance and the transformation of fair employment policy in Illinois, 1945-1964 -- Pattern for partnership: putting labor racketeering on the nation's agenda in the late 1950s / David Witwer -- "Compulsory unionism": Sylvester Petro and the career of an anti-union idea, 1957-1987 / Joseph A. McCartin and Jean-Christian Vinel -- Wal-Mart, John Tate, and their anti-union America / Nelson Lichtenstein -- "All deals are off": the Dunlop Commission and employer opposition to labor law reform / John Logan -- Is democracy in the cards? A democratic defense of the Employee Free Choice Act / Susan Orr.
abstract
"The legislative attack on public sector unionism that gave rise to the uproar in Wisconsin and other union strongholds in 2011 was not just a reaction to the contemporary economic difficulties faced by the government. Rather, it was the result of a longstanding political and ideological hostility to the very idea of trade unionism put forward by a conservative movement whose roots go as far back as the Haymarket Riot of 1886. The controversy in Madison and other state capitals reveals that labor's status and power has always been at the core of American conservatism, today as well as a century ago. The Right and Labor in America explores the multifaceted history and range of conservative hostility toward unionism, opening the door to a fascinating set of individuals, movements, and institutions that help explain why, in much of the popular imagination, union leaders are always "bosses" and trade union organizers are nothing short of "thugs." The contributors to this volume explore conservative thought about unions, in particular the ideological impulses, rhetorical strategies, and political efforts that conservatives have deployed to challenge unions as a force in U.S. economic and political life over the century. Among the many contemporary books on American parties, personalities, and elections that try to explain why political disputes are so divisive, this collection of original and innovative essays is essential reading."--Publisher.
catalogue key
8430249
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [321]-402) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-12-01:
The editors and contributors present a much-needed range of analyses of the dynamics of labor-management relations and the related growth of the post-WW II Right in the US. In four broadly topical categories, the editors and 14 other scholars from several disciplines and countries combine to scrutinize the ideas and ideologies, the reasons and rationalizations, the strategies and the tactics of traditional conservatives, corporate apologists, and economic theorists. From the outset, the authors cast doubt on the conventional assumption that a social contract between big business and big labor emerged after WW II, and some treat as spurious any claim to American exceptionalism as well. Individual essays focus on specific aspects of Rightist opposition to the union movement: the assumption of Austrian School economic theory as a foundation of American free enterprise; the coordination of media coverage to transform a local event into a national controversy that was to shift the political agenda; the contribution of business to the litigiousness of US society through its sustained opposition to government regulatory agencies; and much more. The authors display sound scholarship and much insight in examining these phenomena. Summing Up: Recommended. Advanced undergraduates and above. J. A. Young Montgomery College Community College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This volume makes a major contribution to a growing body of work on the origins of modern conservatism and the rise of the New Right. It vividly demonstrates that if antiunionism did not assume the same significance as antitaxation or Christian fundamentalism, it proved to be significant in its own right. Future scholars will have to pay heed."-Bruce Laurie, author of The Rise of Conservatism in America, 1945-2000
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title explores the multifaceted history and range of conservative hostility toward unionism, opening the door to a fascinating set of individuals, movements, and institutions that help explain why, in much of the popular imagination, union leaders are always 'bosses' and trade union organizers are nothing short of 'thugs'.
Main Description
The legislative attack on public sector unionism that gave rise to the uproar in Wisconsin and other union strongholds in 2011 was not just a reaction to the contemporary economic difficulties faced by the government. Rather, it was the result of a longstanding political and ideological hostility to the very idea of trade unionism put forward by a conservative movement whose roots go as far back as the Haymarket Riot of 1886. The controversy in Madison and other state capitals reveals that labor's status and power has always been at the core of American conservatism, today as well as a century ago. The Right and Labor in Americaexplores the multifaceted history and range of conservative hostility toward unionism, opening the door to a fascinating set of individuals, movements, and institutions that help explain why, in much of the popular imagination, union leaders are always "bosses" and trade union organizers are nothing short of "thugs." The contributors to this volume explore conservative thought about unions, in particular the ideological impulses, rhetorical strategies, and political efforts that conservatives have deployed to challenge unions as a force in U.S. economic and political life over the century. Among the many contemporary books on American parties, personalities, and elections that try to explain why political disputes are so divisive, this collection of original and innovative essays is essential reading.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Entangled Histories: American Conservatism and the U.S. Labor Movement in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuriesp. 1
The Conservative Search for Social Harmonyp. 11
Unions, Modernity, and the Decline of American Economic Nationalismp. 15
The American Legion and Striking Workers During the Interwar Periodp. 27
Democracy or Seduction? The Demonization of Scientific Management and the Deification of Human Relationsp. 42
Region, Race, and Resistance to Organized Laborp. 77
Capital Flight, "States' Rights," and the Anti-Labor Offensive After World War IIp. 79
Orval Faubus and the Rise of Anti-Labor Populism in Northwestern Arkansasp. 98
"Is Freedom of the Individual Un-American?" Right-to-Work Campaigns and Anti-Union Conservatism, 1943-1958p. 114
Appropriating the Language of Civil Rightsp. 137
Singing "The Right-to-Work Blues": The Politics of Race in the Campaign for "Voluntary Unionism" in Postwar Californiap. 139
Whose Rights? Litigating the Right to Work, 1940-1980p. 160
"Such Power Spells Tyranny": Business Opposition to Administrative Governance and the Transformation of Fair Employment Policy in Illinois, 1945-1964p. 181
The Specter of Union Power and Corruptionp. 203
Pattern for Partnership: Putting Labor Racketeering on the Nation's Agenda in the Late 1950sp. 207
"Compulsory Unionism": Sylvester Petro and the Career of an Anti-Union Idea, 1957-1987p. 226
Wal-Mart, John Tate, and Their Anti-Union Americap. 252
"All Deals Are Off": The Dunlop Commission and Employer Opposition to Labor Law Reformp. 276
Is Democracy in the Cards? A Democratic Defense of the Employee Free Choice Actp. 296
Notesp. 321
List of Contributorsp. 403
Indexp. 407
Acknowledgmentsp. 421
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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