Catalogue


Labor rising : the past and future of working people in America /
edited by Richard A. Greenwald, Daniel Katz.
imprint
New York : New Press, The, 2012.
description
xiv, 318 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9781595585189 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New Press, The, 2012.
isbn
9781595585189 (pbk.)
contents note
Building a new working-class politics from below -- Learning from the right: a new operation Dixie? -- Reimagining a multicultural labor movement through education -- What labor looks like: from Wisconsin to Cairo, youth hold a mirror to history of workers' struggles -- Bringing the organizing tradition home: campus-labor-community partnerships for regional power -- Placing labor -- Home as work -- Contingent, transient, and at-risk: modern workers in a gig economy -- Postmortem: yellow dogs and company-dominated elections - Solidarity, citizenship, and the opportunities of disasters -- The hour when the ship comes in -- Getting over the new deal -- Your American dream, my American nightmare -- Organized labor: declining source of hope? -- Eco-Keynesianism, green jobs and labor's need to embrace climate justice -- On economics and labor solidarity -- Ghost marks and rising spirits in an industrial landscape: communication and imagination in the rebirth of labor -- Immigrant workers and labor's future -- The foundations of modern farm worker unionism: from UFW to PCUN -- Supply-chain tourist: or how Wal-Mart has transformed the contemporary labor question -- Forgetting and remembering: workers, the U.S. empire, and the post-9/11 era -- Bananas, elephants, and a coup: learning international solidarity the hard way -- Afterword: labor rising?
abstract
"When Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker threatened the collective bargaining rights of the state's public-sector employees in early 2011, the huge protests that erupted in response put the labor movement back on the nation's front pages. It was a fleeting reminder of a not-so-distant past when the "labor question"-and the power of organized labor-was part and parcel of a century-long struggle for justice and equality in America. Now, on the heels of the expansive "Occupy Wall Street" movement, the lessons of history-in seemingly short supply-are a vital handhold for the thousands of activists and citizens everywhere who sense that something has gone terribly wrong. This pithy but accessible volume provides readers with an understanding of the history that is directly relevant to the economic and political crises working people face today, and points the way to a revitalized twenty-first-century labor movement. With original contributions from leading labor historians, social critics, and activists, Labor Rising makes crucial connections between the past and present, and then looks forward, asking how we might imagine a different future for all Americans"--
catalogue key
8421706
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel Katz is a professor of history and the dean of labor studies at the National Labor College in Silver Spring, Maryland. A former union organizer, he sits on the boards of the New York State Labor History Association and Jews for Racial and Economic Justice. He is the author of All Together Different-Yiddish Socialists, Garment Workers, and the Labor Roots of Multiculturalism. He lives in Brooklyn. RICHARD A. GREENWALD is a professor of history and social sciences and the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at St. Joseph's College in Brooklyn. He is the author of The Triangle Fire, the Protocols of Peace, and Industrial Democracy in Progressive Era Hew York. He blags on workplace issues for In These Times and has written for The Progressive, Businessweek online, the Brooklyn Rail, and the Wall Street Journal. He lives in Queens, New York.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-04-16:
In an era when workers are in desperate straits, labor historians Katz (All Together Different) and Greenwald offer a passionate and thought-provoking collection of original essays that focuses on the prospects for empowering labor in the U.S. As the activists, professors, and social critics who contributed to this collection note, U.S. workers haven't had a real raise since 1979; their unions are weak and fractured, and according to recent estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, almost 30% of all Americans work contingently as contractors, consultants, day laborers, or are self-employed. Some essays highlight the labor successes of the past to draw lessons for the future, such as how in the 1920s in a similar period of union decline, the Jewish-led International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union built one of the most influential unions of the mid-20th century by promoting multiculturalism through labor education. With such topics as how Wal-Mart transformed the labor market, the need to embrace green jobs, and the potential for reframing labor rights as a moral issue on college campuses, this cogent, varied, and accessible collection has much to offer union leaders, social advocates, and all those curious about the future of the labor movement. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, April 2012
Booklist, May 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
At a time of high unemployment, failing economies and slashed public spending, what does the future hold? This text provides readers with an understanding of the history that is directly relevant to the economic and political crises working people face.
Library of Congress Summary
"When Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker threatened the collective bargaining rights of the state's public-sector employees in early 2011, the huge protests that erupted in response put the labor movement back on the nation's front pages. It was a fleeting reminder of a not-so-distant past when the "labor question"-and the power of organized labor-was part and parcel of a century-long struggle for justice and equality in America. Now, on the heels of the expansive "Occupy Wall Street" movement, the lessons of history-in seemingly short supply-are a vital handhold for the thousands of activists and citizens everywhere who sense that something has gone terribly wrong. This pithy but accessible volume provides readers with an understanding of the history that is directly relevant to the economic and political crises working people face today, and points the way to a revitalized twenty-first-century labor movement. With original contributions from leading labor historians, social critics, and activists, Labor Rising makes crucial connections between the past and present, and then looks forward, asking how we might imagine a different future for all Americans"--
Main Description
At a time of high unemployment, failing economies and slashed public spending, what does the future hold? On the heels of the expansive Occupy movement, the lessons of history are a vital handhold for the thousands of activists and citizens everywhere who sense that something has gone terribly wrong. This pithy yet accessible volume provides readers with an understanding of the history that is directly relevant to the economic and political crises working people face today. Labor Rising points the way to a revitalized 21st century labour movement.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Forewordp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Community and Coalitionsp. 11
Building a New Working-Class Politics from Belowp. 14
Learning from the Right: A New Operation Dixie?p. 26
Reimagining a Multicultural Labor Movement Through Educationp. 37
What Labor Looks Like: From Wisconsin to Cairo, Youth Hold a Mirror to History of Workers' Strugglesp. 53
Bringing the Organizing Tradition Home: Campus-Labor-Community Partnerships for Regional Powerp. 65
Place Mattersp. 81
Placing Laborp. 83
Home as Workp. 100
Contingent, Transient, and At-Risk: Modern Workers in a Gig Economyp. 111
State and Policyp. 123
Postmortem: Yellow Dogs and Company-Dominated Electionsp. 126
Solidarity, Citizenship, and the Opportunities of Disastersp. 143
The Hour When the Ship Comes Inp. 154
Getting Over the New Dealp. 164
Your American Dream, My American Nightmarep. 174
Political Economyp. 189
Organized Labor: Declining Source of Hope?p. 191
Eco-Keynesianism, Green Jobs, and Labor's Need to Embrace Climate Justicep. 201
On Economics and Labor Solidarityp. 214
Ghost Marks and Rising Spirits in an Industrial Landscape: Communication and Imagination in the Rebirth of Laborp. 227
Beyond Bordersp. 237
Immigrant Workers and Labor's Futurep. 240
The Foundations of Modern Farm Worker Unionism: From UFW to PCUNp. 253
Supply-Chain Tourist: Or How Wal-Mart Has Transformed the Contemporary Labor Questionp. 267
Forgetting and Remembering: Workers, the U.S. Empire, and the Post-9/11 Erap. 278
Bananas, Elephants, and a Coup: Learning International Solidarity the Hard Wayp. 289
Afterword: Labor Rising?p. 303
About the Contributorsp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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