An environmental history of Canada /
Laurel Sefton MacDowell.
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2012.
description
339 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
9780774821025 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2012.
isbn
9780774821025 (pbk.)
contents note
Introduction -- Encountering a New Land -- Settling the Land and Transforming the "Wilderness" -- Early Cities and Urban Reform -- The Conservation Movement -- Mining Resources -- Cars, Consumerism, and Suburbs -- Changing Energy Regimes -- Water -- The Contested World of Food and Agriculture -- The Environmental Movement and Public Policy -- Parks and Wildlife -- Coastal Fisheries -- The North and Climate Change.
abstract
"Throughout history most people have associated northern North America with wilderness -- with snow-capped mountains, endless forest and prairie, myriad lakes, and abundant fish and game. Canada’s contemporary picture gallery, however, contains more disturbing images -- melting ice caps, deforestation, polluted waterways, and depleted fisheries. Adopting both a chronological and thematic approach, Laurel MacDowell explores human interactions with the land, and the origins of our current environmental crisis, from first peoples to the Kyoto Protocol. This richly illustrated exploration of the past from an environmental perspective will change the way Canadians and others around the world think about -- and look at -- Canada."--Publisher.
catalogue key
8421701
 
Also issued in electronic format.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2013
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Summaries
Main Description
Throughout history most people have associated northern North America with wilderness -- with abundant fish and game, snow-capped mountains, and endless forest and prairie. Canada#146;s contemporary picture gallery, however, contains more disturbing images -- deforested mountains, empty fisheries, and melting ice caps. Adopting both a chronological and thematic approach, Laurel MacDowell examines human interactions with the land, and the origins of our current environmental crisis, from first peoples to the Kyoto Protocol. This richly illustrated exploration of the past from an environmental perspective will change the way Canadians and others around the world think about -- and look at -- Canada.
Description for Teachers/Educators
This book is essential reading for teachers, students, scholars, andanyone interested in Canadian history, the environment, and buildingsustainable communities.
Long Description
Traces how Canada's colonial and national developmentcontributed to modern environmental problems such as urban sprawl, thecollapse of fisheries, and climate change Includes over 200 photographs, maps, figures, and sidebardiscussions on key figures, concepts, and cases Offers concise definitions of environmental concepts Ties Canadian history to issues relevant to contemporarysociety Introduces students to a new, dynamic approach to the past Throughout history most people have associated northern NorthAmerica with wilderness - with abundant fish and game,snow-capped mountains, and endless forest and prairie. Canada'scontemporary picture gallery, however, contains more disturbing images- deforested mountains, empty fisheries, and melting ice caps.Adopting both a chronological and thematic approach, Laurel MacDowellexamines human interactions with the land, and the origins of ourcurrent environmental crisis, from first peoples to the Kyoto Protocol.This richly illustrated exploration of the past from an environmentalperspective will change the way Canadians and others around the worldthink about - and look at - Canada.
Main Description
People throughout history have associated northern North America with wilderness - with abundant fish and game, snow-capped mountains, myriad lakes, and endless stretches of forests, foothills, and prairies. Canada's contemporary picture gallery, however, contains more disturbing images - deforested mountains, empty fisheries, and melting ice caps. This dynamic new text explores human interactions with the land, and our current environmental crisis, from first peoples to beyond the Kyoto Protocol. Adopting both a chronological and thematic approach, MacDowell traces how the myth of bounty led successive waves of newcomers and corporations to exploit the country's natural resources and, ultimately, build our current car-based consumer culture. She tells of ongoing environmental degradation but also of the struggle of conservationists, environmentalists, and ordinary citizens to preserve the nation's bounty for future generations. This richly illustrated exploration of the past from an environmental perspective will change the way Canadians and people around the world think about, and look at, Canada.

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