Catalogue


Social work in Africa : exploring culturally relevant education and practice in Ghana /
Linda Kreitzer.
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2012.
description
xxviii, 242 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1552385108 (pbk.), 9781552385104 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2012.
isbn
1552385108 (pbk.)
9781552385104 (pbk.)
catalogue key
8420657
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 201-219) and index.
Issued also in electronic formats.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Linda Kreitzer is an associate professor in the Faculty of Social Work (Central and Northern Alberta Region) at the University of Calgary. She has an extensive background in practising, researching, and teaching social work in Britain, Ghana, and Canada. Her experience with Ghana began in 1994 while teaching social work at the University of Ghana through Voluntary Services Overseas, a British NGO.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-10-01:
Kreitzer (Univ. of Calgary, Canada) does an admirable job in a compact text reviewing the past, current, and possibly future state of social work in Africa. Using data from her dissertation research in Ghana, the author thoughtfully examines the factors that influenced and continue to influence much of Africa and its social welfare system. The best part of the book is her examination of how education in much of Africa today still reifies colonial culture. She draws examples from social work education in Ghana to lend support to the contention that schools of social work need to work to provide an indigenous social welfare system and a similar training program steeped in indigenous ideals. Though written by a Westerner with a critical but still Western bias, the book will be helpful to anyone in the field of international social work, particularly those interested in advancement of the profession in developing countries. Of particular value are the experiential exercises Kreitzer provides in the appendixes on promoting critical self-awareness and critiquing the neoliberal perspective. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. C. Altman Adelphi University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
Social Work in Africa offers professors, students, and practitioners insight concerning social work in the African context. Its purpose is to encourage examination of the social work curriculum and to demonstrate practical ways to make it more culturally relevant. Drawing on her experience as a social work instructor in Ghana with field research conducted for her doctoral thesis, author Linda Kreitzer addresses the history of social work in African countries, the hegemony of western knowledge in the field, and the need for culturally and regionally informed teaching resources and programs. Guided by a strong sense of her limitations and responsibilities as a privileged outsider and a belief that "only Ghanaians can critically look at and decide on a culturally relevant curriculum for themselves," Kreitzer utilizes Participatory Action Research methodology to successfully move the topic of culturally relevant practices from rhetoric to demonstration. Social Work in Africa is aimed at programs and practise in Ghana; at the same time, it is intended as a framework for the creation of culturally relevant social work curricula in other African countries and other contexts.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Offering professors, students and practitioners insights into social work in the African context, this text encourages examination of the social work curriculum and demonstrates practical ways to make it more culturally relevant.
Main Description
Drawing on her experience as a social work instructor in Ghana and field research conducted for her doctoral thesis, author Linda Kreitzer addresses the history of social work in African countries, the hegemony of Western knowledge in the field, and the need for culturally and regionally informed teaching resources and programs. Guided by a strong sense of her limitations and responsibilities as a privileged outsider, Kreitzer utilizes Participatory Action Research methodology to move the topic of culturally relevant practises from rhetoric to demonstration. Social Work in Africa is intended as a framework for the creation of culturally relevant social work curricula in African countries and other contexts.
Main Description
This book offers professors, students, and practitioners insight concerning social work in the African context. Its purpose is to encourage examination of the social work curriculum and to demonstrate practical ways to make it more culturally relevant. Drawing on her experience as a social work instructor in Ghana with field research conducted for her doctoral thesis, author Linda Kreitzer addresses the history of social work in African countries, the hegemony of western knowledge in the field, and the need for culturally and regionally informed teaching resources and programs. Guided by a strong sense of her limitations and responsibilities as a privileged outsider and a belief that "only Ghanaians can critically look at and decide on a culturally relevant curriculum for themselves", Kreitzer utilises Participatory Action Research methodology to successfully move the topic of culturally relevant practises from rhetoric to demonstration. The book is aimed at programs and practise in Ghana; at the same time it is intended as a framework for the creation of culturally relevant social work curricula in other African countries and other contexts.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Situating the Contextp. xiii
Prologuep. xxv
Historical Contextp. 1
Historical influences affecting social work education in Africap. 1
Sub-Saharan African universities - Historical context
Sub-Saharan African universities - Current state
Institutions affecting social work education in Africap. 11
International level
Continental level
National level
Summaryp. 11
History of social work in Ghanap. 33
Introduction
Colonial period
Social work training in Ghana
Conclusion of chapterp. 39
Cultural Identityp. 43
African culture and identityp. 43
Understanding culture
Understanding identity
Understanding cultural identity
How Africa's history has influenced African cultural identityp. 50
African cultural identity todayp. 56
African cultural identity and social workp. 60
Professional identity
Professional training
Professional practice
Culturally relevant social work practice
Conclusion of chapterp. 70
Hegemony of Western Knowledgep. 73
Imperialism and educationp. 73
Hegemony of knowledgep. 75
Western knowledge and social work educationp. 77
Ethics and values
Conclusion of chapterp. 85
Neo-Liberal Policiesp. 89
The rise of international financial institutionsp. 89
Present economic issues in Africap. 92
Consequences of neo-liberal policiesp. 94
Social work and neo-liberal policiesp. 98
Conclusion of chapterp. 104
Development and Aidp. 107
History of development theoriesp. 107
Development through modernization
The effects of modernization theory on poor countries
Social work and developmentp. 116
The role of social welfare institutions
National development and social policy
NGOs and development
Conclusion of chapterp. 126
Creating Culturally Relevant Education and Practicep. 129
Introductionp. 130
Recognizing the need for changep. 131
Rediscovery of history and culture
Critically evaluating present curricula
Using the Ghanaian context for a case study on curriculum changep. 141
The process of identifying culturally relevant curriculap. 141
Ghanaian research findingsp. 144
Changes to the present curriculum
Developing new courses
Other issues arising from the research process
Outcomes of the research project
Dissemination of information
Conclusion of chapterp. 179
The Future of Social Work in Africap. 181
Role-playing exercise examining pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial Ghanap. 191
p. 195
Cultural awareness
Neo-liberal agenda exercise
Referencesp. 201
Notesp. 221
Indexp. 225
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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