Catalogue


Iran facing others : identity boundaries in a historical perspective /
edited by Abbas Amanat and Farzin Vejdani.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xiii, 292 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0230102530 (hardback), 9780230102538 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230102530 (hardback)
9780230102538 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Part One: Legacy of Cultural Exclusion * Iran and Aniran: The Shaping of a Legend--Dick Davis * Redrawing the Boundaries of 'Ajam in Early Modern Persian Literary History--Sunil Sharma * Part Two: The Internal Frontiers * Iranian History in Transition: Recasting the Symbolic Identity of Babak Khorramdin--Touraj Atabaki * Across the Black Sands and the Red: Travel and the Frontiers of Nineteenth-Century Central Asia--Arash Khazeni * Part Three: Empires and Encounters * Facing a Rude and Barbarous Neighbor: Iranian Perceptions of Russia and the Russians from the Safavids to the Qajars--Rudi Matthee * British Imperialism, Regionalism, and Nationalism in Iran, 1889-1919--H. Lyman Stebbins * Shifting Loyalties in Imperial Borderlands: Safavid Renegades and Ottoman Rebels--Fariba Zarinebaf * Part Four: Self-Fashioning and Othering * The Academic Debate on Iran and Iranian Identity: Challenging Nationalist and Orientalist Narratives--Afshin Matin-Asgari * Some Thoughts on Inter-Societal Linkages between Iran and Iraq--Houchang Chehabi * Part Five: Domestic and Globalized Anxieties * Dolgoruki's 'Memoirs': From Fiction to Master Narrative--Mina Yazdani * Zoroastrians of Iran and Parsis of India: A Dilemma of Identity--Monica Ringer.
abstract
"This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity. It problematizes the notion of an all-inclusive and universal "Iranian-ness" while considering the place of collective memory and sense of community. It consists of five parts organized along thematic lines. The first part, "The Legacy of Cultural Exclusion," deals with the medieval and early modern attempts to define notions of Iran and 'ajam and its supposed others--aniran, Turco-Mongols, and South Asians--through the Persian medieval epic, the Shahnamah, Persian literary histories and tazkirahs. The second part, "The Internal Frontiers," deals with the question of identity at the frontiers of Iran, including nineteenth century travel narratives in Khurasan, Azerbaijani regional re-readings of the significance of Babak Khorramdin, and Qashqa'i attitudes towards the "Iranian" state. The third part, "Empires and Encounters," examines the nature of Iranian interactions with Empires--Russian, British and Ottoman--in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis of political and cultural "othering". The fourth part, "Identity and Iranian Political Cultures," discusses the Iranian intellectual engagement with Orientalism and the shaping of Iranian understandings of self and other in the twentieth century. Part five, "Globalized anxieties," expands on the theme of Iranian cultural anxieties--both domestically and internationally--and how the modern Iranian state (including the Islamic Republic) copes with the challenges of globalization, the treatment of its own minorities, and imagined domestic enemies. Finally, it addresses how Iranian diaspora communities negotiate their identities abroad, particularly in the United States"--
catalogue key
8417429
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Abbas Amanat is a professor of History and International Studies at Yale University. He is the author of Resurrection and Renewal: The Making of the Babi Movement in Iran (1985 and 2005); Pivot of the Universe: Nasir al-Din Shah and the Iranian Monarchy (1987 and 2008) and Apocalyptic Islam and Iranian Shiism (2009). His forthcoming book is entitled In Search of Modern Iran: Authority, Memory and Nationhood, 1501-2005. Farzin Vejdani is an assistant professor of modern Iranian history at the University of Arizona. He received his PhD in history from Yale University (2009). His research interests broadly cover late nineteenth-and early twentieth-century Iranian intellectual and cultural history, including Turco-Iranian cultural relations, the development of language policy and folklore studies in late Qajar and early Pahlavi Iran, and Iranian nationalist historiography. His recent publications include Crafting Constitutional Narratives: Iranian and Young Turk Solidarity 1907-1909 (2010).
Summaries
Main Description
This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity. It problematizes the notion of an all-inclusive and universal “Iranian-ness” while considering the place of collective memory and sense of community. It consists of five parts organized along thematic lines. The first part, “The Legacy of Cultural Exclusion,” deals with the medieval and early modern attempts to define notions of Iran and ‘ajam and its supposed others-aniran, Turco-Mongols, and South Asians-through the Persian medieval epic, the Shahnamah, Persian literary histories and tazkirahs. The second part, “The Internal Frontiers,” deals with the question of identity at the frontiers of Iran, including nineteenth century travel narratives in Khurasan, Azerbaijani regional re-readings of the significance of Babak Khorramdin, and Qashqa’i attitudes towards the “Iranian” state. The third part, “Empires and Encounters,” examines the nature of Iranian interactions with Empires-Russian, British and Ottoman-in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis of political and cultural “othering”. The fourth part, “Identity and Iranian Political Cultures,” discusses the Iranian intellectual engagement with Orientalism and the shaping of Iranian understandings of self and other in the twentieth century. Part five, “Globalized anxieties,” expands on the theme of Iranian cultural anxieties-both domestically and internationally-and how the modern Iranian state (including the Islamic Republic) copes with the challenges of globalization, the treatment of its own minorities, and imagined domestic enemies. Finally, it addresses how Iranian diaspora communities negotiate their identities abroad, particularly in the United States.
Main Description
This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity. It problematizes the notion of an all-inclusive and universal "Iranian-ness" while considering the place of collective memory and sense of community. It consists of five parts organized along thematic lines. The first part, "The Legacy of Cultural Exclusion," deals with the medieval and early modern attempts to define notions of Iran and 'ajam and its supposed others'” aniran , Turco-Mongols, and South Asians'”through the Persian medieval epic, the Shahnamah , Persian literary histories and tazkirah s. The second part, "The Internal Frontiers," deals with the question of identity at the frontiers of Iran, including nineteenth century travel narratives in Khurasan, Azerbaijani regional re-readings of the significance of Babak Khorramdin, and Qashqa'i attitudes towards the "Iranian" state. The third part, "Empires and Encounters," examines the nature of Iranian interactions with Empires'”Russian, British and Ottoman'”in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis of political and cultural "othering". The fourth part, "Identity and Iranian Political Cultures," discusses the Iranian intellectual engagement with Orientalism and the shaping of Iranian understandings of self and other in the twentieth century. Part five, "Globalized anxieties," expands on the theme of Iranian cultural anxieties'”both domestically and internationally'”and how the modern Iranian state (including the Islamic Republic) copes with the challenges of globalization, the treatment of its own minorities, and imagined domestic enemies. Finally, it addresses how Iranian diaspora communities negotiate their identities abroad, particularly in the United States.
Main Description
This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity. It problematizes the notion of an all-inclusive and universal "Iranian-ness" while considering the place of collective memory and sense of community. It consists of five parts organized along thematic lines. The first part, "The Legacy of Cultural Exclusion," deals with the medieval and early modern attempts to define notions of Iran and 'ajam and its supposed others aniran , Turco-Mongols, and South Asiansthrough the Persian medieval epic, the Shahnamah , Persian literary histories and tazkirah s. The second part, "The Internal Frontiers," deals with the question of identity at the frontiers of Iran, including nineteenth century travel narratives in Khurasan, Azerbaijani regional re-readings of the significance of Babak Khorramdin, and Qashqa'i attitudes towards the "Iranian" state. The third part, "Empires and Encounters," examines the nature of Iranian interactions with EmpiresRussian, British and Ottomanin the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis of political and cultural "othering". The fourth part, "Identity and Iranian Political Cultures," discusses the Iranian intellectual engagement with Orientalism and the shaping of Iranian understandings of self and other in the twentieth century. Part five, "Globalized anxieties," expands on the theme of Iranian cultural anxietiesboth domestically and internationallyand how the modern Iranian state (including the Islamic Republic) copes with the challenges of globalization, the treatment of its own minorities, and imagined domestic enemies. Finally, it addresses how Iranian diaspora communities negotiate their identities abroad, particularly in the United States.
Main Description
Iran's long history and complex cultural legacy have generated animated debates about a homogenous Iranian identity in the face of ethnic, linguistic and communal diversity. The volume examines the fluid boundaries of pre-modern identity in history and literature as well as the shaping of Iranian national identity in the 20th century.
Description for Bookstore
This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity
Long Description
This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity. It problematizes the notion of an all-inclusive and universal "Iranian-ness" while considering the place of collective memory and sense of community. It consists of five parts organized along thematic lines. The first part, "The Legacy of Cultural Exclusion," deals with the medieval and early modern attempts to define notions of Iran and 'ajam and its supposed others - aniran , Turco-Mongols, and South Asians - through the Persian medieval epic, the Shahnamah , Persian literary histories and tazkirah s. The second part, "The Internal Frontiers," deals with the question of identity at the frontiers of Iran, including nineteenth century travel narratives in Khurasan, Azerbaijani regional re-readings of the significance of Babak Khorramdin, and Qashqa'i attitudes towards the "Iranian" state. The third part, "Empires and Encounters," examines the nature of Iranian interactions with Empires - Russian, British and Ottoman - in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis of political and cultural "othering". The fourth part, "Identity and Iranian Political Cultures," discusses the Iranian intellectual engagement with Orientalism and the shaping of Iranian understandings of self and other in the twentieth century. Part five, "Globalized anxieties," expands on the theme of Iranian cultural anxieties - both domestically and internationally - and how the modern Iranian state (including the Islamic Republic) copes with the challenges of globalization, the treatment of its own minorities, and imagined domestic enemies. Finally, it addresses how Iranian diaspora communities negotiate their identities abroad, particularly in the United States.
Main Description
This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity. It problematizes the notion of an all-inclusive and universal "Iranian-ness" while considering the place of collective memory and sense of community. It consists of five parts organized along thematic lines. The first part, "The Legacy of Cultural Exclusion," deals with the medieval and early modern attempts to define notions ofIranand‘ajamand its supposed others--aniran, Turco-Mongols, and South Asians--through the Persian medieval epic, theShahnamah, Persian literary histories andtazkirahs. The second part, "The Internal Frontiers," deals with the question of identity at the frontiers of Iran, including nineteenth century travel narratives in Khurasan, Azerbaijani regional re-readings of the significance of Babak Khorramdin, and Qashqa'i attitudes towards the "Iranian" state. The third part, "Empires and Encounters," examines the nature of Iranian interactions with Empires--Russian, British and Ottoman--in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis of political and cultural "othering". The fourth part, "Identity and Iranian Political Cultures," discusses the Iranian intellectual engagement with Orientalism and the shaping of Iranian understandings of self and other in the twentieth century. Part five, "Globalized anxieties," expands on the theme of Iranian cultural anxieties--both domestically and internationally--and how the modern Iranian state (including the Islamic Republic) copes with the challenges of globalization, the treatment of its own minorities, and imagined domestic enemies. Finally, it addresses how Iranian diaspora communities negotiate their identities abroad, particularly in the United States.
Main Description
Iran's long history and complex cultural legacy have generated animated debates about a homogenous Iranian identity in the face of ethnic, linguistic and communal diversity. The volume examines the fluid boundaries of pre-modern identity in history and literature as well as the shaping of Iranian national identity in the 20th century. The formation of a national Self in modern times involved not only Iran's collective memory and adherence to Shi'ism but encounters with external Others such as the Ottoman, Russian and British empires. Dealings with the modern Iraqi neighbor also reveal blurred identity boundaries. Anxieties about domestic Others, such as Jews, Baha'is and Zoroastrians, informed Iran's nationalist and contemporary Islamic narratives.
Main Description
This collection of essays is about Iranian identity in its various manifestations as it encountered the challenge of modernity. It problematizes the notion of an all-inclusive and universal "Iranian-ness" while considering the place of collective memory and sense of community.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Iranian Identity Boundaries: A Historical Overviewp. 1
The Legacy of Cultural Exclusion and Contested Memories
Iran and Aniran: The Shaping of a Legendp. 37
Redrawing the Boundaries of 'Ajam in Early Modern Persian Literary Historiesp. 49
Iranian History in Transition: Recasting the Symbolic Identity of Babak Khorramdinp. 63
Empires and Encounters
Rebels and Renegades on Ottoman-Iranian Borderlands: Porous Frontiers and Hybrid Identitiesp. 79
Facing a Rude and Barbarous Neighbor: Iranian Perceptions of Russia and the Russians from the Safavids to the Qajarsp. 99
Through the Persian Eye: Anglophilia and Anglophobia in Modern Iranian Historyp. 125
British Imperialism, Regionalism, and Nationalism in Iran, 1890-1919p. 151
Nationalism and the Appropriation of the Past
The Academic Debate on Iranian Identity: Nation and Empire Entangledp. 171
Iran and Iraq: Intersocietal Linkages and Secular Nationalismsp. 191
Self-Fashioning and Internal Othering
Identity among the Jews of Iranp. 219
The Confessions of Dolgoruki: The Crisis of Identity and the Creation of a Master Narrativep. 243
Iranian Nationalism and Zoroastrian Identity: Between Cyrus and Zoroasterp. 265
Contributorsp. 277
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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