Catalogue


Stumbling toward the constitution : the economic consequences of freedom in the Atlantic world /
Jonathan M. Chu.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xv, 277 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230340466 (hardback), 9780230340466 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230340466 (hardback)
9780230340466 (hardback)
abstract
"This book explores how Americans adjusted their economic behavior to new market incentives that resulted from the American Revolution. Jonathan Chu explores individual economic and legal behaviors, connecting them to adjustments in trade relations with Europe and Asia, the rise in debt litigation in Western Massachusetts, deflation and monetary illiquidity, and the Bank of North America"--
catalogue key
8417427
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [253]-272 and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jonathan M. Chu is an associate professor of American History at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. He is the author of Neighbors, Friends, or Madmen and has been the recipient of American Antiquarian Society-National Endowment for the Humanities, Library Company's Program in Early American Society and Economy, and Fulbright fellowships.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'In this fascinating and exhaustively researched study, Jonathan Chu explores howbetween 1783 and 1787the thirteen former colonies lurched toward a new understanding of 'governing in freedom.' With marked difficulty, they struggled to add muscle to an existing frame work for 'a central government that transcended state sovereignty.' Chu has produced a very impressive piece of historical scholarship.' - Jonathan Lurie, Professor Emeritus, Department of History, Rutgers University 'Stumbling Towards the Constitutionis an ambitious reconsideration of the Confederation period of American history. Chu surveys a wide range of economic activityland speculation, banks, Atlantic trade, China trade, and moreto explore the ramifications of the economic changes that accompanied the Revolution. He argues powerfully and persuasively that the strategies Americans devised to cope with debt, insolvency, and a dysfunctional monetary system forced them to frame questions of political economy in ways that led to more fundamental consideration of the constitutional powers they would formulate in 1787. The result is a new understanding of the where the economic powers embodied in the Constitution came from.' - Bruce H. Mann, Carl F. Schipper, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard University
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
An exploration of the economic consequences of the American Revolution
Library of Congress Summary
"This book explores how Americans adjusted their economic behavior to new market incentives that resulted from the American Revolution. Jonathan Chu explores individual economic and legal behaviors, connecting them to adjustments in trade relations with Europe and Asia, the rise in debt litigation in Western Massachusetts, deflation and monetary illiquidity, and the Bank of North America"--
Main Description
Underwater mortgages, plunging prices, overextended consumers, deflation, a surfeit of lawsuits and bankruptcies: such were the realities of 1784-1787. These difficulties were the driving impetus of the re-examination of the Articles of Confederation. InStumbling Towards the Constitution, Jonathan M. Chu examines the economic and constitutional adjustments Americans made after Independence to consider their impact on the debates over the Constitutional Convention. This book provides keen insight into how the Constitution developed, but more importantly, reveals how economically based this development was, and how connected it was to commerce and international trade in the Atlantic world.
Main Description
Underwater mortgages, plunging prices, overextended consumers, deflation, a surfeit of lawsuits and bankruptcies: such were the realities of 1784-1787. These difficulties were the driving impetus of the re-examination of the Articles of Confederation. In'Stumbling Towards the Constitution' , Jonathan M. Chu examines the economic and constitutional adjustments Americans made after Independence to consider their impact on the debates over the Constitutional Convention. This book provides keen insight into how the Constitution developed, but more importantly, reveals how economically based this development was, and how connected it was to commerce and international trade in the Atlantic world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Jonathan Chu explores individual economic and legal behaviors, connecting them to adjustments in trade relations with Europe and Asia, the rise in debt litigation in Western Massachusetts, deflation and monetary illiquidity, and the Bank of North America.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Series Introduction: "The New Urban Atlantic"p. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Independence, the United States, and the Atlantic Communityp. 1
Reorienting Trade: The Origins of Sino-American Tradep. 19
American Merchants in the Postrevolutionary Worldp. 43
Debt and Taxes: The Economy, State Action, and Private Behaviorp. 71
Illiquidity, Depression, and Debt Litigation in Western Massachusettsp. 91
A Necessary Expedient: Monetary Stability and the Bank of North Americap. 109
The Bank of North America: A Dreadful Engine of Oppressionp. 137
The Unfinished Revolution: A Uniform System of Commercial Intercourse and Regulationsp. 159
Monetary Symbols mid Glossaryp. 189
Notesp. 191
Bibliographyp. 253
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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