Catalogue


Enlightened aid : U.S. development as foreign aid policy in Ethiopia /
Amanda Kay McVety.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
description
x, 297 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0199796912 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780199796915 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
isbn
0199796912 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780199796915 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: the American answer -- Improving nations -- A global economy -- Strategic Ethiopia -- Truman's Fourth Point -- The Ethiopian experiment -- The development decade -- Rethinking the American answer.
catalogue key
8417325
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-08-01:
Enlightened Aid is a wide-ranging, very readable intellectual history of the US bilateral foreign aid program, punctuated with historical snippets of the US-Ethiopian aid relationship. McVety (history, Miami Univ., Ohio) weaves back from Truman's 1949 inaugural address introducing the Point Four foreign aid program through early Western interaction with Ethiopia and the musings of Samuel Johnson and Scottish Enlightenment writers David Hume and Adam Smith. McVety draws on these and other writers to explore Western beliefs about economic development that inform attitudes toward less developed countries and foreign aid. Readers need to appreciate this approach to appreciate McVety's work; the text does not return to 1949 for some 80 pages. The focus is certainly historical, with careful treatment of the early decades; progress through recent times is far swifter. The US-Ethiopian interaction is interwoven with the book's real focus--intellectual history of the idea of development and how it shapes foreign aid as a tool of foreign policy--providing an interesting though monochromatic sketch of Ethiopian history. This study should interest intellectual omnivores as well as intellectual historians who focus on this period of US foreign policy. Summing Up: Recommended. Researchers, faculty, and general readers. C. Kilby Villanova University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Setting Ethiopia's tragedy in the context of the Cold War and two centuries of economic thought, Enlightened Aid is a definitive and revealing requiem for development." --The Journal of American History "This broadly-conceived and highly original study makes an important contribution to the growing literature on the pre-Cold War history of developmentalism, whose origins are traced back to the thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment in the eighteenth century. Spanning eight decades of American interventions in Ethiopia, Enlightened Aid provides an often surprising account of a paradigmatic example of American foreign aid, and its underlying hubristic rationales, which have been inexplicably neglected by historians and other social scientists." --Michael Adas, Abraham E. Voorhees Professor of History, Rutgers University at New Brunswick "Amanda Kay McVety's ambitious book situates American development aid to Ethiopia in the broadest context, shedding light on the evolving meanings of development, on American programs in the early Cold War, and on the emergence of the peculiar developmentalist state of Ethiopia. Ranging from David Hume to Walt Rostow, from Haile Selassie to Jeffrey Sachs, Enlightened Aid is a welcome contribution to histories of development, expanding the geographic and chronological boundaries of the field." --David C. Engerman, Associate Professor of History, Brandeis University
"This broadly-conceived and highly original study makes an important contribution to the growing literature on the pre-Cold War history of developmentalism, whose origins are traced back to the thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment in the eighteenth century. Spanning eight decades of American interventions in Ethiopia,Enlightened Aidprovides an often surprising account of a paradigmatic example of American foreign aid, and its underlying hubristic rationales, which have been inexplicably neglected by historians and other social scientists." --Michael Adas, Abraham E. Voorhees Professor of History, Rutgers University at New Brunswick "Amanda Kay McVety's ambitious book situates American development aid to Ethiopia in the broadest context, shedding light on the evolving meanings of development, on American programs in the early Cold War, and on the emergence of the peculiar developmentalist state of Ethiopia. Ranging from David Hume to Walt Rostow, from Haile Selassie to Jeffrey Sachs,Enlightened Aidis a welcome contribution to histories of development, expanding the geographic and chronological boundaries of the field." --David C. Engerman, Associate Professor of History, Brandeis University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Enlightened Aid' examines the intellectual and political origins of Point Four, the first American aid programme for the developing world, and the economic and diplomatic implications of its operations in Ethiopia.
Long Description
Enlightened Aid is a unique history of foreign aid. It begins with the modern concept of progress in the Scottish Enlightenment, follows its development in nineteenth and early twentieth-century economics and anthropology, describes its transformation from a concept into a tool of foreign policy, and ends with the current debate about aid's utility. In his 1949 inaugural address, Harry Truman vowed to make the development of the underdeveloped world a central part of the United States government's national security agenda. This commitment became policy the following year with the creation of Point Four-America's first aid program to the developing world. Point Four technicians shared technology, know-how, and capital with thirty-four nations around the world. They taught classes on public health and irrigation, distributed chickens andvaccines, and helped build schools and water treatment facilities. They did all of it in the name of development, believing that economic progress would lead to social and political progress, which, in turn, would ensure that Point Four recipient nations would become prosperous democratic participantsin the global community of nations. Point Four was a weapon in the fight against poverty, but it was also a weapon in the fight against the Soviet Union. Eisenhower reluctantly embraced it and Kennedy made it a central part of his international policy agenda, turning Truman's program into the United States Agency for International Development. Point Four had proven itself to be a useful tool of diplomacy, and subsequent administrations claimed it for themselves. None seemed overly worried thatit had not also proven itself to be a particularly useful tool of development. Using Ethiopia as a case study, Enlightened Aid: U.S. Development as Foreign Policy in Ethiopia examines the struggle between foreign aid-for-diplomacy and foreign aid-for-development. Point Four's creators believed that aid could be both at the same time. The history of U.S. aid to Ethiopia suggests otherwise.
Long Description
Enlightened Aid is a unique history of foreign aid. The book begins with the modern concept of progress in the Scottish Enlightenment, follows the development of this concept in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century economics and anthropology, describes its transformation from a concept into a tool of foreign policy, and ends with the current debate about foreign aid's utility. In his 1949 inaugural address, Harry Truman vowed tomake the development of the underdeveloped world a central part of the U.S. government's national security agenda. This commitment became policy the following year with the creation of Point Four--America's first aid program to the developing world. Point Four technicians shared technology, know-how, and capital with people in nations around the world. They taught classes on public health and irrigation, distributed chickens and vaccines, and helped build schools and water treatment facilities.They did alof this in the name of development, believing that economic progress would lead to social and political progress, which, in turn, would ensure that Point Four recipient nations would become prosperous democratic participants in the global community of nations. Point Four was a weapon in the fight against poverty, but it was also a weapon in the fight against the Soviet Union. Eisenhower reluctantly embraced it and Kennedy made it a central part of his international policy agenda, turningTruman's program into the United States Agency for International Development. Point Four had proven itself to be a useful tool of diplomacy, and subsequent administrations claimed it for themselves. None seemed overly worried that it had not also proven itself to be a particularly useful tool of development. Using Ethiopia as a case study, Enlightened Aid examines the struggle between foreign aid-for-diplomacy and foreign aid-for-development. Point Four's creatorsbelieved thataid could be both at the same time. The history of U.S. aid to Ethiopia suggests otherwise.
Main Description
Enlightened Aid is a unique history of foreign aid. It begins with the modern concept of progress in the Scottish Enlightenment, follows its development in nineteenth and early twentieth-century economics and anthropology, describes its transformation from a concept into a tool of foreignpolicy, and ends with the current debate about aid's utility. In his 1949 inaugural address, Harry Truman vowed to make the development of the underdeveloped world a central part of the United States government's national security agenda. This commitment became policy the following year with the creation of Point Four-America's first aid program to thedeveloping world. Point Four technicians shared technology, know-how, and capital with thirty-four nations around the world. They taught classes on public health and irrigation, distributed chickens and vaccines, and helped build schools and water treatment facilities. They did all of it in the nameof development, believing that economic progress would lead to social and political progress, which, in turn, would ensure that Point Four recipient nations would become prosperous democratic participants in the global community of nations. Point Four was a weapon in the fight against poverty, butit was also a weapon in the fight against the Soviet Union. Eisenhower reluctantly embraced it and Kennedy made it a central part of his international policy agenda, turning Truman's program into the United States Agency for International Development. Point Four had proven itself to be a usefultool of diplomacy, and subsequent administrations claimed it for themselves. None seemed overly worried that it had not also proven itself to be a particularly useful tool of development. Using Ethiopia as a case study, Enlightened Aid: U.S. Development as Foreign Policy in Ethiopia examines the struggle between foreign aid-for-diplomacy and foreign aid-for-development. Point Four's creators believed that aid could be both at the same time. The history of U.S. aid to Ethiopiasuggests otherwise.
Main Description
Enlightened Aidis a unique history of foreign aid. It begins with the modern concept of progress in the Scottish Enlightenment, follows its development in nineteenth and early twentieth-century economics and anthropology, describes its transformation from a concept into a tool of foreign policy, and ends with the current debate about aid's utility. In his 1949 inaugural address, Harry Truman vowed to make the development of the underdeveloped world a central part of the United States government's national security agenda. This commitment became policy the following year with the creation of Point Four-America's first aid program to the developing world. Point Four technicians shared technology, know-how, and capital with thirty-four nations around the world. They taught classes on public health and irrigation, distributed chickens and vaccines, and helped build schools and water treatment facilities. They did all of it in the name of development, believing that economic progress would lead to social and political progress, which, in turn, would ensure that Point Four recipient nations would become prosperous democratic participants in the global community of nations. Point Four was a weapon in the fight against poverty, but it was also a weapon in the fight against the Soviet Union. Eisenhower reluctantly embraced it and Kennedy made it a central part of his international policy agenda, turning Truman's program into the United States Agency for International Development. Point Four had proven itself to be a useful tool of diplomacy, and subsequent administrations claimed it for themselves. None seemed overly worried that it had not also proven itself to be a particularly useful tool of development. Using Ethiopia as a case study,Enlightened Aid: U.S. Development as Foreign Policy in Ethiopiaexamines the struggle between foreign aid-for-diplomacy and foreign aid-for-development. Point Four's creators believed that aid could be both at the same time. The history of U.S. aid to Ethiopia suggests otherwise.
Main Description
Enlightened Aidis a unique history of foreign aid. The book begins with the modern concept of progress in the Scottish Enlightenment, follows the development of this concept in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century economics and anthropology, describes its transformation from a concept into a tool of foreign policy, and ends with the current debate about foreign aid's utility. In his 1949 inaugural address, Harry Truman vowed to make the development of the underdeveloped world a central part of the U.S. government's national security agenda. This commitment became policy the following year with the creation of Point Four--America's first aid program to the developing world. Point Four technicians shared technology, know-how, and capital with people in nations around the world. They taught classes on public health and irrigation, distributed chickens and vaccines, and helped build schools and water treatment facilities. They did all of this in the name of development, believing that economic progress would lead to social and political progress, which, in turn, would ensure that Point Four recipient nations would become prosperous democratic participants in the global community of nations. Point Four was a weapon in the fight against poverty, but it was also a weapon in the fight against the Soviet Union. Eisenhower reluctantly embraced it and Kennedy made it a central part of his international policy agenda, turning Truman's program into the United States Agency for International Development. Point Four had proven itself to be a useful tool of diplomacy, and subsequent administrations claimed it for themselves. None seemed overly worried that it had not also proven itself to be a particularly useful tool of development. Using Ethiopia as a case study,Enlightened Aidexamines the struggle between foreign aid-for-diplomacy and foreign aid-for-development. Point Four's creators believed that aid could be both at the same time. The history of U.S. aid to Ethiopia suggests otherwise.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: The American Answerp. 1
Improving Nationsp. 5
A Global Economyp. 38
Strategic Ethiopiap. 62
Truman's Fourth Pointp. 83
The Ethiopian Experimentp. 121
The Development Decadep. 161
Rethinking the "American Answer"p. 195
Notesp. 223
Selected Bibliographyp. 265
Indexp. 287
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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