Catalogue


Young British muslims [electronic resource] : identity, culture, politics and the media /
Nahid Afrose Kabir.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
description
xiii, 240 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0748641335 (hbk.), 9780748641338 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
isbn
0748641335 (hbk.)
9780748641338 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction : my research observations -- The identity debate -- Muslims in Britain : an overview -- The religious and cultural dilemma -- To be or not to be British -- Is the media biased against Muslims? -- The niqab debate -- Indignation about the proposal to include shariah law in Britain -- Conclusion : a humanitarian way forward.
abstract
Based on 216 in-depth interviews of Muslims in Britain, examines how British Muslim youths and young adults, 15-30 years old, define their identities, their values and their culture and whether these conflict either with those of their parents or with the dominant non-Muslim British culture.
catalogue key
8415452
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-230) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nahid Afrose Kabir is a visiting fellow at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University, USA. She is the author of Muslims in Australia: Immigration, Race Relations and Cultural History (2005).
Reviews
Review Quotes
A useful overview of issues relating to Muslims in Britain, with a particular focus on the political and media context of the last decade or more … It is highly readable, with a clear structure and concise overview of significant socio-political issues … A second strength can be found in the extensive qualitative material deployed to support more general discussions concerning familiar and high-profile political issues. The multiple voices of young Muslim participants in this study regularly shine through, highlighting the ways in which individuals form and express nuanced opinions, often on matters that are frequently simplified by mainstream discourse.
A useful overview of issues relating to Muslims in Britain, with a particular focus on the political and media context of the last decade or more... It is highly readable, with a clear structure and concise overview of significant socio-political issues... A second strength can be found in the extensive qualitative material deployed to support more general discussions concerning familiar and high-profile political issues. The multiple voices of young Muslim participants in this study regularly shine through, highlighting the ways in which individuals form and express nuanced opinions, often on matters that are frequently simplified by mainstream discourse.
Young British Muslimsis to be welcomed as an important contribution.
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
In Britain's highly politicised social climate in the aftermath of the 7/7 London bombings, Young British Muslims: Identity, Culture, Politics and the Media provides an in-depth understanding of British Muslim identity through the following social constructs: migration history, family settlement, socio-economic status, religion and culture, and the wider societal environment. The author, Nahid Afrose Kabir, has carried out extensive research on young Muslims' identity in Australia and the UK. For this book she conducted ethnographic fieldwork in the form of in-depth, semi-structured interviews of over 200 young Muslims in five British cities: London, Leicester, Bradford, Leeds and Cardiff. Kabir's careful analysis of interview responses offers insights into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims from remarkably diverse ethnicities: Algerian, Bangladeshi, Egyptian, Indian, Iranian, Iraqi, Kenyan, Lebanese, Libyan, Malawi, Mauritian, Moroccan, Nigerian, Pakistani, Palestinian, Singaporean, Somali, Sudanese, Syrian, Ugandan, Yemeni, and English, Danish and Scottish converts. By emphasising the importance of biculturalism, the author conveys a realistic and hopeful vision for their successful integration into British society. Nahid Afrose Kabir is a visiting fellow at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the Harvard University, USA. She is the author of Muslims in Australia: Immigration, Race Relations and Cultural History(2005).
Description for Reader
Offers insights into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims from remarkably diverse ethnicities Now available in paperback In Britain's highly politicised social climate in the aftermath of the 7/7 London bombings, Young British Muslims: Identity, Culture, Politics and the Media provides an in-depth understanding of British Muslim identity through the following social constructs: migration history, family settlement, socio-economic status, religion and culture, and the wider societal environment. The author, Nahid Afrose Kabir, has carried out extensive research on young Muslims' identity in Australia and the UK. For this book she conducted ethnographic fieldwork in the form of in-depth, semi-structured interviews of over 200 young Muslims in five British cities: London, Leicester, Bradford, Leeds and Cardiff. Kabir's careful analysis of interview responses offers insights into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims from remarkably diverse ethnicities: Algerian, Bangladeshi, Egyptian, Indian, Iranian, Iraqi, Kenyan, Lebanese, Libyan, Malawi, Mauritian, Moroccan, Nigerian, Pakistani, Palestinian, Singaporean, Somali, Sudanese, Syrian, Ugandan, Yemeni, and English, Danish and Scottish converts. By emphasising the importance of biculturalism, the author conveys a realistic and hopeful vision for their successful integration into British society.
Description for Teachers/Educators
Ethnic and Cultural studies; Islamic studies
Main Description
In Britain's highly politicised social climate in the aftermath of the 7/7 London bombings, Young British Muslims: Identity and Belonging provides an in-depth understanding of British Muslim identity through the following social constructs: migration history, family settlement, socio-economic status, religion and culture, and the wider societal environment. The author, Nahid Afrose Kabir, has carried out extensive research on young Muslims' identity in Australia and the UK. For this book she conducted ethnographic fieldwork in the form of in-depth, semi-structured interviews of over 200 young Muslims in five British cities: London, Leicester, Bradford, Leeds and Cardiff. Kabir's careful analysis of interview responses offers insights into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims from remarkably diverse ethnicities: Algerian, Bangladeshi, Indian, Iranian, Iraqi, Kenyan, Libyan, Mauritius, Moroccan, Pakistani, Palestinian, Somali, Sudanese, Syrian, Yemeni, and English and Scottish converts. By emphasising the importance of biculturalism, the author conveys a realistic and hopeful vision for their successful integration into British society.
Main Description
In Britain's highly politicised social climate in the aftermath of the 7/7 London bombings, Young British Muslims: Identity, Culture, Politics and the Media provides an in-depth understanding of British Muslim identity through the following social constructs: migration history, family settlement, socio-economic status, religion and culture, and the wider societal environment. The author, Nahid Afrose Kabir, has carried out extensive research on young Muslims' identity in Australia and the UK. For this book she conducted ethnographic fieldwork in the form of in-depth, semi-structured interviews of over 200 young Muslims in five British cities: London, Leicester, Bradford, Leeds and Cardiff. Kabir's careful analysis of interview responses offers insights into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims from remarkably diverse ethnicities: Algerian, Bangladeshi, Egyptian, Indian, Iranian, Iraqi, Kenyan, Lebanese, Libyan, Malawi, Mauritian, Moroccan, Nigerian, Pakistani, Palestinian, Singaporean, Somali, Sudanese, Syrian, Ugandan, Yemeni, and English, Danish and Scottish converts. By emphasising the importance of biculturalism, the author conveys a realistic and hopeful vision for their successful integration into British society.
Main Description
In Britain's highly politicised social climate in the aftermath of the 7/7 London bombings, Young British Muslims: Identity, Culture, Politics and the Media provides an in-depth understanding of British Muslim identity through the following social constructs: migration history, family settlement, socio-economic status, religion and culture, and the wider societal environment. The author, Nahid Afrose Kabir, has carried out extensive research on young Muslims' identity in Australia and the UK. For this book she conducted ethnographic fieldwork in the form of in-depth, semi-structured interviews of over 200 young Muslims in five British cities: London, Leicester, Bradford, Leeds and Cardiff. Kabir's careful analysis of interview responses offers insights into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims from remarkably diverse ethnicities: Algerian, Bangladeshi, Indian, Iranian, Iraqi, Kenyan, Libyan, Mauritius, Moroccan, Pakistani, Palestinian, Somali, Sudanese, Syrian, Yemeni, and English and Scottish converts. By emphasising the importance of biculturalism, the author conveys a realistic and hopeful vision for their successful integration into British society.
Main Description
The 7/7 bombings that shook London created a new, highly politicized atmosphere, especially for Britain's young Muslim population. Young British Muslims constructs a portrait of contemporary British Muslim identity through social constructs such as migration, settlement, religion, culture, socioeconomic status, and wider social environments. Nahid Afrose Kabir is a long-time researcher of young Muslim identity in Australia and the UK. For this book, she conducts ethnographic fieldwork with more than two hundred young Muslims from five British cities: London, Leicester, Bradford, Leeds, and Cardiff. Her careful analysis and revealing interviews offer insight into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims, and her impeccable selection of testimony represents a remarkable range of ethnicities: Algerian, Bangladeshi, Indian, Iranian, Iraqi, Kenyan, Libyan, Mauritius, Moroccan, Pakistani, Palestinian, Somali, Sudanese, Syrian, Yemeni, and English and Scottish converts. Emphasizing the value of biculturalism, Kabir paints a realistic and hopeful vision of Muslims and their successful integration into British society.
Main Description
The 7/7 bombings that shook London created a new, highly politicized atmosphere, especially for Britain's young Muslim population. Young British Muslimsconstructs a portrait of contemporary British Muslim identity through social constructs such as migration, settlement, religion, culture, socioeconomic status, and wider social environments. Nahid Afrose Kabir is a long-time researcher of young Muslim identity in Australia and the UK. For this book, she conducts ethnographic fieldwork with more than two hundred young Muslims from five British cities: London, Leicester, Bradford, Leeds, and Cardiff. Her careful analysis and revealing interviews offer insight into the hopes and aspirations of British Muslims, and her impeccable selection of testimony represents a remarkable range of ethnicities: Algerian, Bangladeshi, Indian, Iranian, Iraqi, Kenyan, Libyan, Mauritius, Moroccan, Pakistani, Palestinian, Somali, Sudanese, Syrian, Yemeni, and English and Scottish converts. Emphasizing the value of biculturalism, Kabir paints a realistic and hopeful vision of Muslims and their successful integration into British society.
Table of Contents
List of tables and figuresp. vi
List of abbreviationsp. vii
Glossaryp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. x
Forewordp. xii
Introduction: my research observationsp. 1
The identity debatep. 6
Muslims in Britain: an overviewp. 28
The religious and cultural dilemmap. 58
To be or not to be Britishp. 79
Is the media biased against Muslims?p. 112
The niqab debatep. 143
Indignation about the proposal to include shariah law in Britainp. 169
Conclusion: a humanitarian way forwardp. 199
Bibliographyp. 219
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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