Catalogue


Water and American government [electronic resource] : the Reclamation Bureau, national water policy, and the West, 1902-1935 /
Donald J. Pisani.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
description
xviii, 394 p., [10] p. of plates : ill., maps.
ISBN
0520230302 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
isbn
0520230302 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Saving lost lives : irrigation and the ideology of homemaking -- The perils of public works : Federal reclamation, 1902-1909 -- Case studies in irrigation and community : Twin Falls and Rupert -- An administrative morass : Federal reclamation, 1909-1917 -- Boom, bust and boom : Federal reclamation, 1917-1935 -- Uneasy allies : the Reclamation Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs -- Case studies in water and power : the Yakima and the Pima -- Wiring the new West : the strange career of public power -- Gateway to the hydraulic age : water politics, 1920-1935 -- Conclusion : retrospect and significance.
catalogue key
8415293
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The author is a master in his field. No one until now has told so much of this story in a solidly researched, critical, and convincing fashion. This book will appeal not only to historians but also to political scientists, legal scholars, environmentalists, and others interested in public policy, federalism, and the politics of water in American society."--Norris Hundley, author of The Great Thirst: Californians and Water, a History "A tour de force. It deals with a critical period in which commitments were made that profoundly influenced the nation's environment. In brief case studies [Pisani] puts a human face on events and places."--Martin Ridge, author of Writing the History of the American West and coauthor of Westward Expansion: A History of the American Frontier
Flap Copy
"The author is a master in his field. No one until now has told so much of this story in a solidly researched, critical, and convincing fashion. This book will appeal not only to historians but also to political scientists, legal scholars, environmentalists, and others interested in public policy, federalism, and the politics of water in American society."--Norris Hundley, author ofThe Great Thirst: Californians and Water, a History "A tour de force. It deals with a critical period in which commitments were made that profoundly influenced the nation's environment. In brief case studies [Pisani] puts a human face on events and places."--Martin Ridge, author ofWriting the History of the American Westand coauthor ofWestward Expansion: A History of the American Frontier
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-05-01:
Sequel to the author's To Reclaim a Divided West: Water, Law, and Public Policy, 1848-1902 (CH, Mar'93), this volume covers from 1902, when Congress created the US Reclamation Service, then the largest federal public works program ever undertaken, up to the completion of Boulder Dam in 1936. The first five chapters trace the evolution of Reclamation Service policies and irrigation projects and the politics that influenced them. The next two chapters deal with the Service's interaction with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the final two chapters focus on public hydroelectric development in the West. Several themes pervade the work, among them the persistence of 19th-century laissez-faire values well into the 20th century and the hopelessness of centralized administration and systematic planning in a political system that was filled with competing bureaucratic entities and that protected and encouraged local interests. Pisanti focuses on politics and government as they influenced water policy, not on social history. Although it does not read as nicely as Marc Reisner's Cadillac Desert (CH, Dec'86) or Donald Worster's Rivers of Empire (CH, May'86), this book does a better job of analyzing the bewildering complexities of water politics in the American west. An impressive and solid scholarly work. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. T. S. Reynolds Michigan Technological University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
This is a history of the Bureau of Reclamation from the adoption of the Reclamation Act of 1902 to the completion of the Hoover Dam in 1935.
Long Description
Donald Pisani's history of perhaps the boldest economic and social program ever undertaken in the United States--to reclaim and cultivate vast areas of previously unusable land across the country--shows in fascinating detail how ambitious government programs fall prey to the power of local interest groups and the federal system of governance itself. What began as the underwriting of a variety of projects to create family farms and farming communities had become by the 1930s a massive public works and regional development program, with an emphasis on the urban as much as on the rural West.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Donald Pisani's history of perhaps the boldest economic and social program ever undertaken in the United States, shows in fascinating detail how ambitious government programs fall prey to the power of local interest groups and the federal system of governance itself.
Table of Contents
List of Maps
Preface and Acknowledgments
Saving Lost Lives: Irrigation and the Ideology of Homemakingp. 1
The Perils of Public Works: Federal Reclamation, 1902-1909p. 32
Case Studies in Irrigation and Community: Twin Falls and Rupertp. 65
An Administrative Morass: Federal Reclamation, 1909-1917p. 96
Boom, Bust, and Boom: Federal Reclamation, 1917-1935p. 123
Uneasy Allies: The Reclamation Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairsp. 154
Case Studies in Water and Power: The Yakima and the Pimap. 181
Wiring the New West: The Strange Career of Public Powerp. 202
Gateway to the Hydraulic Age: Water Politics, 1920-1935p. 235
Conclusion: Retrospect and Significancep. 272
Abbreviationsp. 297
Notesp. 299
Indexp. 389
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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