Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

To place our deeds [electronic resource] : the African American community in Richmond, California, 1910-1963 /
Shirley Ann Wilson Moore.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
description
xiii, 232 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520215656 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
isbn
0520215656 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8414973
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 203-218) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Shirley Ann Wilson Moors is Professor of History at California State University, Sacramento
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A fascinating study. . . . It truly comes alive in its expert use of African American oral histories"--Waldo E. Martin, University of California, Berkeley
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-05-01:
Moore traces the emergence of the African American community in Richmond, California, an industrial suburb north of Oakland. By 1940, Richmond's population (24,000) remained small; blacks made up one percent. This changed during WW II. By 1943, Richmond's Henry J. Kaiser shipyards employed 100,000 workers; the city's population soon reached that number, with African Americans accounting for 13 percent. As with Eastern and Midwest cities, black migrants from both the urban and rural South came seeking good jobs and brought with them cultural patterns (folk healing, blues and gospel music) and social organizations (Pentecostal churches and social clubs) that helped them survive, adapt to, and influence the new environment. Although migrants confronted some hostility from Richmond's native African Americans, the rapid growth of white racism and Jim Crow required joint action. Migrants often led protest efforts challenging employment, housing, and other discrimination that greatly restricted black Richmond. They also quickly entered the political process. The study is well researched and makes fine use of oral histories collected by the author. Strongly recommended for collections in urban studies, African American history, and sociology. All levels. J. Borchert; Cleveland State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The historical development of one black working class community over a fifty year period is examined here. This researched social history is based on oral histories, newspaper and archival collections.
Long Description
To Place Our Deeds traces the development of the African American community in Richmond, California, a city on the San Francisco Bay. This readable, extremely well-researched social history, based on numerous oral histories, newspapers, and archival collections, is the first to examine the historical development of one black working-class community over a fifty-year period. Offering a gritty and engaging view of daily life in Richmond, Shirley Ann Wilson Moore examines the process and effect of migration, the rise of a black urban industrial workforce, and the dynamics of community development. She describes the culture that migrants brought with them--including music, food, religion, and sports--and shows how these traditions were adapted to new circumstances. Working-class African Americans in Richmond used their cultural venues--especially the city's legendary blues clubs--as staging grounds from which to challenge the racial status quo, with a steadfast determination not to be "Jim Crowed" in the Golden State. As this important work shows, working-class African Americans often stood at the forefront of the struggle for equality and were linked to larger political, social, and cultural currents that transformed the nation in the postwar period.
Main Description
It's a rich look at the working-class black community from 1910 to the civil rights era. Moore offers a rare glimpse of black history from the perspective of ordinary folks, rather than elites.
Main Description
To Place Our Deedstraces the development of the African American community in Richmond, California, a city on the San Francisco Bay. This readable, extremely well-researched social history, based on numerous oral histories, newspapers, and archival collections, is the first to examine the historical development of one black working-class community over a fifty-year period. Offering a gritty and engaging view of daily life in Richmond, Shirley Ann Wilson Moore examines the process and effect of migration, the rise of a black urban industrial workforce, and the dynamics of community development. She describes the culture that migrants brought with them--including music, food, religion, and sports--and shows how these traditions were adapted to new circumstances. Working-class African Americans in Richmond used their cultural venues--especially the city's legendary blues clubs--as staging grounds from which to challenge the racial status quo, with a steadfast determination not to be "Jim Crowed" in the Golden State. As this important work shows, working-class African Americans often stood at the forefront of the struggle for equality and were linked to larger political, social, and cultural currents that transformed the nation in the postwar period.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
List of Tablesp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Richmond before the War: A "Slow, Gradual and Comforting" Changep. 7
Shipyards and Shipbuildersp. 40
Boomtownp. 71
Demobilization, Rising Expectations, and Postwar Realitiesp. 94
Traditions from Homep. 127
Epilogue: Community, Success, and Unfulfilled Promisep. 147
Notesp. 151
Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem