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A Tibetan revolutionary [electronic resource] : the political life and times of Bapa Phüntso Wangye /
Melvyn C. Goldstein, Dawei Sherap, and William R. Siebenschuh.
imprint
Berkeley, CA : University of California Press, c 2004.
description
xxiv, 371 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520240898 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley, CA : University of California Press, c 2004.
isbn
0520240898 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8414962
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Melvyn C. Goldstein is John Reynolds Harkness Professor in Anthropology and codirector of the Center for Research on Tibet at Case Western Reserve University.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"These extraordinary memoirs dictated by a key figure in the history of 20th century Sino-Tibetan relations are essential reading for all interested in understanding this important subject. The founder of the Tibetan Communist Party recalls vividly his personal role in the epic struggle of the Tibetan people over tradition and modernity, and the hopes, betrayals and tragedies that have marked it. The idealism, honesty and courage that have defined his life are in full evidence in this gripping personal narrative."--John L. Holden, President, National Committee on U.S.-China Relations "This is one of the great untold stories of modern Tibet. PhÜntso Wangye is a man who has never stopped fighting for his people, and the story of his life is both heartbreaking and inspiring, and essential for understanding what has happened in Tibet since the 1930s. Tibetan history has never before been as exciting to read as it is here."--John Ackerly, President, International Campaign for Tibet
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-01-01:
Bapa Phuntso Wangye (Phunwang), leading Tibetan communist cadre in Lhasa, 1952-58, was imprisoned for 18 years in solitary confinement in Communist China's Bastille. Goldstein, an anthropologist (Case Western Reserve Univ.) long involved with Tibet, has ghost written the autobiography of Phunwang's political life. Based on transcripts of conversations from 1993 on and the work of Tibetan intellectual Sherap, Goldstein recounts the life of an idealistic Khampa expelled from an elite Guomindang school and supported by Chinese Communists and the Soviet Union to organize the Tibetan Communist Party. Phunwang joined the attack on Tibet in 1950 and helped write the "Seventeen Points" that allowed the Dalai Lama to remain as ruler until 1959. Imprisoned for his Tibetan nationalism, Phunwang did not witness the Cultural Revolution, which destroyed traditional Tibet, killing millions. Rehabilitated by Deng Xiaoping, Phunwang resumed life at the center of power in Beijing. How convincing is Goldstein's writing? He does not clarify his or Phunwang's biases. As Phunwang pleads for rapprochement between the Dalai Lama and the morally bankrupt Chinese communist leadership, this book is not simply about minority problems in a multiethnic state. It is a counter in a deadly confrontation. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and up. F. B. Bessac emeritus, University of Montana
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-06-15:
This oral history of the life and times of Tibetan revolutionary Bapa Phuntso Wangye, or Phunwang, reflects the conflict between Western-sponsored Tibetan nationalism and Eastern-imposed Chinese communism. Founder of the Tibetan Communist Party, Phunwang passed through the chaos of the Japanese invasion, Chiang Kai-shek's nationalism, and the Maoist revolution, ultimately merging his party with Mao's Chinese Communist Party. Following the Communist victory in China and China's gaining political hegemony over Tibet, Phunwang was swept up in political and doctrinal intrigue and in 1960 was put in prison, where he remained for 18 years. With the rise of Deng Xiaoping, he was released and rehabilitated. This as-told-to political memoir regarding an avowed Marxist who imposed communism on Tibet must be read cautiously. What turns a potential political polemic into a reasonably creditable story is the effort of Case Western Reserve scholars Goldstein and William R. Siebenschuh and Phunwang's Chinese biographer, Dawei Sherap. Taken from many hours of interviews, the narrative flows well, and the translation is highly readable, with helpful explanatory footnotes. This work deserves a place in academic libraries.-John F. Riddick, Central Michigan Univ. Lib., Mt. Pleasant (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, June 2004
Library Journal, June 2004
Choice, January 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is the as-told-to political autobiography of Phüntso Wangye, one of the most important Tibetan revolutionary figures of the 20th century.
Long Description
This is the as-told-to political autobiography of PhÜntso Wangye (PhÜnwang), one of the most important Tibetan revolutionary figures of the twentieth century. PhÜnwang began his activism in school, where he founded a secret Tibetan Communist Party. He was expelled in 1940, and for the next nine years he worked to organize a guerrilla uprising against the Chinese who controlled his homeland. In 1949, he merged his Tibetan Communist Party with Mao's Chinese Communist Party. He played an important role in the party's administrative organization in Lhasa and was the translator for the young Dalai Lama during his famous 1954-55 meetings with Mao Zedong. In the 1950s, PhÜnwang was the highest-ranking Tibetan official within the Communist Party in Tibet. Though he was fluent in Chinese, comfortable with Chinese culture, and devoted to socialism and the Communist Party, PhÜnwang's deep commitment to the welfare of Tibetans made him suspect to powerful Han colleagues. In 1958 he was secretly detained; three years later, he was imprisoned in solitary confinement in Beijing's equivalent of the Bastille for the next eighteen years. Informed by vivid firsthand accounts of the relations between the Dalai Lama, the Nationalist Chinese government, and the People's Republic of China, this absorbing chronicle illuminates one of the world's most tragic and dangerous ethnic conflicts at the same time that it relates the fascinating details of a stormy life spent in the quest for a new Tibet.
Main Description
This is the as-told-to political autobiography of Phuntso Wangye (Phunwang), one of the most important Tibetan revolutionary figures of the twentieth century. Phunwang began his activism in school, where he founded a secret Tibetan Communist Party. He was expelled in 1940, and for the next nine years he worked to organize a guerrilla uprising against the Chinese who controlled his homeland. In 1949, he merged his Tibetan Communist Party with Maos Chinese Communist Party. He played an important role in the partys administrative organization in Lhasa and was the translator for the young Dalai Lama during his famous 1954-55 meetings with Mao Zedong. In the 1950s, Phunwang was the highest-ranking Tibetan official within the Communist Party in Tibet. Though he was fluent in Chinese, comfortable with Chinese culture, and devoted to socialism and the Communist Party, Phunwangs deep commitment to the welfare of Tibetans made him suspect to powerful Han colleagues. In 1958 he was secretly detained; three years later, he was imprisoned in solitary confinement in Beijings equivalent of the Bastille for the next eighteen years. Informed by vivid firsthand accounts of the relations between the Dalai Lama, the Nationalist Chinese government, and the Peoples Republic of China, this absorbing chronicle illuminates one of the worlds most tragic and dangerous ethnic conflicts at the same time that it relates the fascinating details of a stormy life spent in the quest for a new Tibet.
Short Annotation
This is an as-told-to autobiography of Phuntso Wangye (Phunwang), one of the most important Tibetan Communists in China today.
Unpaid Annotation
This is an as-told-to autobiography of Phuntso Wangye (Phunwang), one of the most important Tibetan Communists in the China today. The narration unfolds a fascinating, and detailed political life of a dedicated Tibetan-communist revolutionary (amazing details of names, dates, locations of historical incidents).
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Note on Romanization and Abbreviationsp. xvii
List of Key Personsp. xix
Introduction: A Brief Historical Contextp. 1
Growing Up in Kham and China
Childhood in Batangp. 7
The Coup of Lobsang Thundrupp. 15
School Yearsp. 22
The Tibetan Communist Party Era
Planning Revolutionp. 41
Returning to Khamp. 50
To Lhasap. 61
The Indian Communist Partyp. 79
On the Verge of Revoltp. 90
Escape to Tibetp. 103
From Lhasa to Yunnanp. 113
The People's Republic of China
The Return to Batangp. 129
The Seventeen-Point Agreementp. 140
To Lhasa Againp. 154
With the PLA in Lhasap. 164
A Year of Problemsp. 173
An Interlude in Beijingp. 185
Beginning Reformsp. 204
Incarceration
Tension in Lhasap. 215
Labeled a Local Nationalistp. 226
To Prisonp. 236
Solitary Confinementp. 245
A Vow of Silencep. 257
After Prison
Release from Prisonp. 271
A New Strugglep. 285
Nationalities Policyp. 294
Epilogue: A Comment by Phunwangp. 311
Original Charter of the Eastern Tibet People's Autonomous Alliancep. 319
Summary of Talks with Tibetan Exile Delegationsp. 325
Some Opinions on Amending the Constitution with Regard to Nationalitiesp. 339
Glossary of Correct Tibetan Spellingsp. 351
Indexp. 359
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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