Catalogue

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Shanghai splendor [electronic resource] : economic sentiments and the making of modern China, 1843-1949 /
Wen-hsin Yeh.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
description
xiii, 305 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520249712 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520249714 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
isbn
0520249712 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520249714 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The material turn -- The state in commerce -- Visual politics and Shanghai glamour -- The clock and the compound -- Enlightened paternalism -- Petty urbanites and tales of woe -- From patriarchs to capitalists -- Epilogue: the return of the banker.
general note
"A Philip E. Lilienthal book in Asian studies"--Jacket.
catalogue key
8414474
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 259-284) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"What a fine and illuminating book!Shanghai Splendoris an important and captivating work of scholarship."--David Strand, author ofRickshaw Beijing: City People and Politics in the 1920s "This in an outstanding work. Although Shanghai has been among the most popular subjects for scholars in modern Chinese studies, one has yet to see a project as impressive as this. Yeh tells a most fascinating story."--David Der-wei Wang, author ofThe Monster That Is History: History, Violence, and Fictional Writing in 20th Century China
Flap Copy
"What a fine and illuminating book! "Shanghai Splendor" is an important and captivating work of scholarship."--David Strand, author of "Rickshaw Beijing: City People and Politics in the 1920s" "This in an outstanding work. Although Shanghai has been among the most popular subjects for scholars in modern Chinese studies, one has yet to see a project as impressive as this. Yeh tells a most fascinating story."--David Der-wei Wang, author of "The Monster That Is History: History, Violence, and Fictional Writing in 20th Century China"
Flap Copy
"What a fine and illuminating book! Shanghai Splendor is an important and captivating work of scholarship."--David Strand, author of Rickshaw Beijing: City People and Politics in the 1920s "This in an outstanding work. Although Shanghai has been among the most popular subjects for scholars in modern Chinese studies, one has yet to see a project as impressive as this. Yeh tells a most fascinating story."--David Der-wei Wang, author of The Monster That Is History: History, Violence, and Fictional Writing in 20th Century China
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-01-01:
Yeh Wen-hsin's account of daily life among Shanghai's middle- and lower-middle-class "white collar" workers from the early 1920s to the late 1940s is well written and generally informative. The monograph's numerous poignant vignettes attest to the profound cultural adjustments and growing social tensions involved in the modern economic transformation of China's greatest metropolis. Yeh's stated objective is to illuminate the "quest for legitimacy and respectability" pursued by Shanghai's emergent bourgeoisie. Adopting a broad approach that covers a sweeping range of topics in a somewhat loosely constructed narrative, she seeks to evaluate attitudes or mentalities not normally within the purview of mainstream economic or business history. Yeh discusses state regulation of incipient commercial and vocational education, advertising and the commoditization of urban life, corporate management in a key modern enterprise (the Bank of China), and the wartime journalistic transformation of popular views of Shanghai capitalism from enlightened paternalism to brutal exploitation. While the author's analytical reach is greater than her grasp, particularly in an inevitably cursory treatment of the late Qing and post-1949 eras, this study is a worthy addition to the growing literature on 20th-century Chinese urbanization and economic development. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers; upper-division undergraduate through professional audiences. R. P. Gardella formerly, United States Merchant Marine Academy
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Rich with details of everyday life, this multifaceted social and cultural history of China's leading metropolis in the 20th century offers a kaleidoscopic view of Shanghai as the major site of Chinese modernisation.
Long Description
Rich with details of everyday life, this multifaceted social and cultural history of China's leading metropolis in the twentieth-century offers a kaleidoscopic view of Shanghai as the major site of Chinese modernization. Engaging the entire span of Shanghai's modern history from the Opium War to the eve of the Communist takeover in 1949, Wen-hsin Yeh traces the evolution of a dazzling urban culture that became alternately isolated and intertwined with China's tumultuous history. Looking in particular Shanghai's leading banks, publishing enterprises, and department stores, she sketches the rise of a new maritime and capitalist economic culture among the city's middle class--a class of urbanites whose quest for social legitimacy and moral respectability set in motion the dynamics that would fashion modern China. Making extensive use of urban tales and visual representations, the book captures these urbanites' voices as it unravels the socio-cultural dynamics that fashioned the people and their politics. As Shanghai emerges today to become a global destination of glamour and consumption, this stellar history shows how the city's century-long history of colonialism and socialist revolution gave birth to Chinese Communism and how its people's aspirations and memories continue to contend for a spot in Shanghai's present and future.
Long Description
Rich with details of everyday life, this multifaceted social and cultural history of China's leading metropolis in the twentieth century offers a kaleidoscopic view of Shanghai as the major site of Chinese modernization. Engaging the entire span of Shanghai's modern history from the Opium War to the eve of the Communist takeover in 1949, Wen-hsin Yeh traces the evolution of a dazzling urban culture that became alternately isolated from and intertwined with China's tumultuous history. Looking in particular at Shanghai's leading banks, publishing enterprises, and department stores, she sketches the rise of a new maritime and capitalist economic culture among the city's middle class. Making extensive use of urban tales and visual representations, the book captures urbanite voices as it uncovers the sociocultural dynamics that shaped the people and their politics.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Material Turnp. 9
The State in Commercep. 30
Visual Politics and Shanghai Glamourp. 51
The Clock and the Compoundp. 79
Enlightened Paternalismp. 101
Petty Urbanites and Tales of Woep. 129
From Patriarchs to Capitalistsp. 152
Epilogue: The Return of the Bankerp. 205
Notesp. 219
Bibliographyp. 259
Glossaryp. 285
Indexp. 293
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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