Catalogue


The Minsk ghetto, 1941-1943 [electronic resource] : Jewish resistance and Soviet internationalism /
Barbara Epstein.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2008.
description
xiv, 351 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520242424 (alk. paper), 9780520242425 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2008.
isbn
0520242424 (alk. paper)
9780520242425 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Jewish-Byelorussian solidarity in World War II Minsk -- Why Minsk was different -- The Minsk ghetto -- The ghetto underground -- Solidarity in wartime Minsk -- Going to the partisans -- The Soviet betrayal of the Minsk underground -- Strategies of resistance elsewhere: the Kovno ghetto.
catalogue key
8413059
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 293-335) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Barbara Epstein has written a revelatory book. Arduously and carefully, she brings to light and to life an aspect of the Holocaust in Belorussia that we did not know, showing us that the victims were not only victims but also fighters. And so were a good many people who were not Jews, yet joined with them to resist Nazi brutality."--Frances Fox Piven, author of Challenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America "When historian Barbara Epstein traveled to Minsk to learn Yiddish, the language of her ancestors, she got more than she bargained for. An amazing, forgotten story emerged that ran against the grain of almost all accounts of the Holocaust. The Minsk Ghetto is an invaluable, and deeply moving addition to Holocaust and World War II history."--Richard Walker, author of The Country in the City: The Greening of the San Francisco Bay Area "This richly researched, beautifully written account of one of the most important instances of inter-ethnic solidarity and resistance in face of the Holocaust packs an analytic punch as powerful as its emotional one."--Leo Panitch, author of Renewing Socialism: Democracy, Strategy and Imagination
Flap Copy
"Barbara Epstein has written a revelatory book. Arduously and carefully, she brings to light and to life an aspect of the Holocaust in Belorussia that we did not know, showing us that the victims were not only victims but also fighters. And so were a good many people who were not Jews, yet joined with them to resist Nazi brutality."--Frances Fox Piven, author ofChallenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America "When historian Barbara Epstein traveled to Minsk to learn Yiddish, the language of her ancestors, she got more than she bargained for. An amazing, forgotten story emerged that ran against the grain of almost all accounts of the Holocaust.The Minsk Ghettois an invaluable, and deeply moving addition to Holocaust and World War II history."--Richard Walker, author ofThe Country in the City: The Greening of the San Francisco Bay Area
Flap Copy
"Barbara Epstein has written a revelatory book. Arduously and carefully, she brings to light and to life an aspect of the Holocaust in Belorussia that we did not know, showing us that the victims were not only victims but also fighters. And so were a good many people who were not Jews, yet joined with them to resist Nazi brutality."--Frances Fox Piven, author ofChallenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America "When historian Barbara Epstein traveled to Minsk to learn Yiddish, the language of her ancestors, she got more than she bargained for. An amazing, forgotten story emerged that ran against the grain of almost all accounts of the Holocaust.The Minsk Ghettois an invaluable, and deeply moving addition to Holocaust and World War II history."--Richard Walker, author ofThe Country in the City: The Greening of the San Francisco Bay Area "This richly researched, beautifully written account of one of the most important instances of inter-ethnic solidarity and resistance in face of the Holocaust packs an analytic punch as powerful as its emotional one."--Leo Panitch, author ofRenewing Socialism: Democracy, Strategy and Imagination
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-07-01:
For several reasons, this is an important study of an episode of the Holocaust in eastern Europe. It is one of the few that explores amity and cooperation between Jews and their Gentile neighbors against a common enemy. It also stands in sharp contrast to the work of Martin Dean, Collaboration in the Holocaust: Crimes of the Local Police in Belorussia and Ukraine (1999), who posits that there were irresolvable differences between the locals and Jews, and especially to the flamboyant study Neighbors by Jan Gross (CH, Mar'02, 39-4145), who argued that it was the next-door citizens, not the occupying Germans, who killed the Jews of Jedwabne. History of consciousness professor Epstein (UC Santa Cruz), however, couching this in the context of Soviet internationalism, finds that in Minsk, numerous locals extended a helping hand to the imprisoned Jews, frequently assisting them to escape and join the partisans. The study is well documented and has a full bibliography and index. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. A. Ezergailis Ithaca College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Valuable [and] illuminating."
"Valuable [and] illuminating."-- The Jerusalem Report
"Very clear and lively. . . . Epstein's book constitutes an important contribution to the English scholarly literature on the topic."
"Very clear and lively. . . . Epstein's book constitutes an important contribution to the English scholarly literature on the topic." -- European Review of History/Revue Europeenne D'histoire
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Drawing from engrossing survivors' accounts, many never before published, The Minsk Ghetto 1941-1943 recounts a heroic yet little-known chapter in Holocaust history. In vivid and moving detail, Barbara Epstein chronicles the history of a Communist-led resistance movement inside the Minsk ghetto, which, through its links to its Belarussian counterpart outside the ghetto and with help from others, enabled thousands of ghetto Jews to flee to the surrounding forests where they joined partisan units fighting the Germans. Telling a story that stands in stark contrast to what transpired across much of Eastern Europe, where Jews found few reliable allies in the face of the Nazi threat, this book captures the texture of life inside and outside the Minsk ghetto, evoking the harsh conditions, the life-threatening situations, and the friendships that helped many escape almost certain death. Epstein also explores how and why this resistance movement, unlike better known movements at places like Warsaw, Vilna, and Kovno, was able to rely on collaboration with those outside ghetto walls. She finds that an internationalist ethos fostered by two decades of Soviet rule, in addition to other factors, made this extraordinary story possible.
Main Description
Drawing from engrossing survivors' accounts, many never before published,The Minsk Ghetto 1941-1943recounts a heroic yet little-known chapter in Holocaust history. In vivid and moving detail, Barbara Epstein chronicles the history of a Communist-led resistance movement inside the Minsk ghetto, which, through its links to its Belarussian counterpart outside the ghetto and with help from others, enabled thousands of ghetto Jews to flee to the surrounding forests where they joined partisan units fighting the Germans. Telling a story that stands in stark contrast to what transpired across much of Eastern Europe, where Jews found few reliable allies in the face of the Nazi threat, this book captures the texture of life inside and outside the Minsk ghetto, evoking the harsh conditions, the life-threatening situations, and the friendships that helped many escape almost certain death. Epstein also explores how and why this resistance movement, unlike better known movements at places like Warsaw, Vilna, and Kovno, was able to rely on collaboration with those outside ghetto walls. She finds that an internationalist ethos fostered by two decades of Soviet rule, in addition to other factors, made this extraordinary story possible.
Main Description
Drawing from engrossing survivors' accounts, many never before published, The Minsk Ghetto 1941-43 recounts a heroic yet little-known chapter in Holocaust history. In vivid and moving detail, Barbara Epstein chronicles the history of a Communist-led resistance movement inside the Minsk ghetto, which, through its links to its Byelorussian counterpart outside the ghetto and with help from others, enabled thousands of ghetto Jews to flee to the surrounding forests where they joined partisan units fighting the Germans. Telling a story that stands in stark contrast to what transpired across much of Eastern Europe, where Jews found few reliable allies in the face of the terrible Nazi threat, this book captures the texture of life inside and outside the Minsk ghetto, evoking the harsh conditions, the life-threatening situations, and the friendships that helped many escape almost certain death. Epstein also explores how and why this resistance movement, unlike better known movements at places like Warsaw, Vilna, and Kovno, was able to rely on collaboration with those outside ghetto walls. She finds that an internationalist ethos fostered by two decades of Soviet rule, in addition to other factors, made this extraordinary story possible.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Jewish-Byelorussian Solidarity in World War II Minskp. 11
Why Minsk Was Differentp. 40
The Minsk Ghettop. 77
The Ghetto Undergroundp. 110
Solidarity in Wartime Minskp. 148
Going to the Partisansp. 188
The Soviet Betrayal of the Minsk Undergroundp. 228
Strategies of Resistance Elsewhere: The Kovno Ghettop. 258
Conclusionp. 283
Notesp. 293
Guide to Namesp. 323
Sourcesp. 329
Indexp. 337
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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