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John Keats and the ideas of the Enlightenment [electronic resource] /
Porscha Fermanis.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2009.
description
vii, 223 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
074863780X (hbk.), 9780748637805 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2009.
isbn
074863780X (hbk.)
9780748637805 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8412583
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [191]-206) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Porscha Fermanis is a Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Literature at University College Dublin. Her research interests include Enlightenment philosophy, Romantic historicism and historical fiction.
Reviews
Review Quotes
In this consistently illuminating and original book Porscha Fermanis places Keats within the history of ideas, persuasively offering us a poet-thinker whose response to the great writers of the Enlightenment was both informed and sympathetic. In a scholarly and thoughtful account, she presents fresh and invigorating readings of the great narrative poems, inviting us to re-consider our normal assumptions about Romanticism and its relationship with eighteenth century thought. John Keats and the Ideas of the Enlightenment is a substantial contribution to our growing sense of the historical Keats.
Porscha Fermanis argues persuasively for a reassessment of Keats's relationship with Enlightenment ideas. In cogent, lucid, and well-informed readings of Keats's longer poems, she provides a creatively enabling sense of what the Enlightenment was and meant to the poet. Keats may have mistrusted aspects of rationalist or progressivist thought, but Porscha Fermanis shows how profoundly his poems engage with the Enlightenment 'science of man'. Offering an original perspective from which to think about the poet's thought, John Keats and the Ideas of the Enlightenment is an impressive and important achievement.
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
John Keats and the Ideas of the EnlightenmentPorscha Fermanis[Endorsements To Follow]John Keats is generally considered to be the least intellectually sophisticated of all the major Romantic poets, but he was a more serious thinker than either his contemporaries or later scholars have acknowledged. This book provides a major reassessment of Keats's intellectual life by considering his engagement with a formidable body of eighteenth-century thought from the work of Voltaire, Robertson, and Gibbon to Hutcheson, Hume, and Smith. The book re-examines some of Keats's most important poems, including The Eve of St Agnes, Hyperion, Lamia, and Ode to Psyche, in the light of a range of Enlightenment ideas and contexts from literary history and cultural progress to anthropology, political economy, and moral philosophy. By demonstrating that the language and ideas of the Enlightenment played a key role in establishing his poetic agenda, Keats's poetry is shown to be less the expression of an intuitive young genius than the product of the cultural and intellectual contexts of his time. Porscha Fermanis is a lecturer in Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Literature at University College Dublin. Her research interests include Enlightenment philosophy, Romantic historicism, and historical fiction. John Keats and the Ideas of the Enlightenment is her first book.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This innovative study provides a major reassessment of Keats' intellectual life by considering his often overlooked engagement with a formidable body of eighteenth-century thought.
Description for Reader
John Keats is generally considered to be the least intellectually sophisticated of all the major Romantic poets, but he was a more serious thinker than either his contemporaries or later scholars have acknowledged. This book provides a major reassessment of Keats's intellectual life by considering his engagement with a formidable body of eighteenth-century thought from the work of Voltaire, Robertson, and Gibbon to Hutcheson, Hume, and Smith. The book re-examines some of Keats's most important poems, including The Eve of St Agnes , Hyperion , Lamia , and Ode to Psyche , in the light of a range of Enlightenment ideas and contexts from literary history and cultural progress to anthropology, political economy, and moral philosophy. By demonstrating that the language and ideas of the Enlightenment played a key role in establishing his poetic agenda, Keats's poetry is shown to be less the expression of an intuitive young genius than the product of the cultural and intellectual contexts of his time. Key Features The first book-length consideration of the relationship between Keats and the ideas of theEnlightenment New and distinctive argument about Keats reassessing his intellectual life and contexts Contributes to our understanding of the relationship between the Romantic period and the eighteenth century/Enlightenment, currently one of the most important debates in literary scholarship Wide appeal to scholars, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates of eighteenth-century and Romantic period literature, history and philosophy; cultural and intellectual historians; historians of ideas
Description for Reader
John Keats is generally considered to be the least intellectually sophisticated of all the major Romantic poets, but he was a more serious thinker than either his contemporaries or later scholars have acknowledged. This book provides a major reassessment of Keats's intellectual life by considering his engagement with a formidable body of eighteenth-century thought from the work of Voltaire, Robertson, and Gibbon to Hutcheson, Hume, and Smith.The book re-examines some of Keats's most important poems, including The Eve of St Agnes, Hyperion, Lamia, and Ode to Psyche, in the light of a range of Enlightenment ideas and contexts from literary history and cultural progress to anthropology, political economy, and moral philosophy. By demonstrating that the language and ideas of the Enlightenment played a key role in establishing his poetic agenda, Keats's poetry is shown to be less the expression of an intuitive young genius than the product of the cultural and intellectual contexts of his time.Key Features The first book-length consideration of the relationship between Keats and the ideas of theEnlightenment New and distinctive argument about Keats reassessing his intellectual life and contexts Contributes to our understanding of the relationship between the Romantic period and the eighteenth century/Enlightenment, currently one of the most important debates in literary scholarship Wide appeal to scholars, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates of eighteenth-century and Romantic period literature, history and philosophy; cultural and intellectual historians; historians of ideas
Description for Teachers/Educators
Romantic LiteratureRomantic PoetryEighteenth-Century History Relevant background reading for postgraduate students on the following courses:MA, Romanticism, Bristol UniversityMPhil, Romanticism and the Forms of Modernity, Glasgow UniversityMA, Romantic and Victorian Literature, University of LancasterMA, Romantic Formations, University of LeedsMA, English Renaissance and Romantic Literature, University of LiverpoolM.St. English (1780-1900 Strand), University of OxfordMA, Writing and Society 1700-1820, Queen Mary, University of LondonMA, Romantic Studies, University of St AndrewsMA, Nineteenth-Century Studies, University of SheffieldMA, English Literature (Romantic Studies Components), University of SussexMA, Nineteenth Century Literature and Culture (component courses in Romantic Studies), University of SussexMA, Nineteenth Century Studies, University College WorcesterMA, Representations and Contexts, 1750-1850, University of YorkMA, Romantic and Sentimental Literature, 1770-1830, University of YorkMA, Writing Women in Britain and North America, 1740-1820, University of YorkMA/Diploma in The Age of Revolutions 1750-1850, University of YorkAlso, MA, Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of Southampton
Main Description
John Keats is considered to be the least intellectually sophisticated of all the major Romantic poets, but he was a more serious thinker than either his contemporaries or later scholars have acknowledged. This innovative study provides a major reassessment of Keats's intellectual life by considering his often overlooked engagement with a formidable body of eighteenth-century thought, from the work of such historians as Robertson and Gibbon to philosophers such as Hume, Smith, and Voltaire. The book re-examines some of Keats's most important poems, including "The Eve of St Agnes," "Hyperion," "Ode to Psyche," and "Lamia," in light of a range of eighteenth-century ideas and contexts, from literary history and cultural progress to anthropology, economics, and political theory. By demonstrating that the language and ideas of the Enlightenment played a key role in his poetic agenda, Keats's poetry is shown to be less the expression of an intuitive boy genius and more the product of the cultural and intellectual contexts of his time. The combination of historical context and textual analysis makes this book of interest to students of cultural and intellectual history, as well as to literary scholars.
Main Description
John Keats is generally considered to be the least intellectually sophisticated of all the major Romantic poets, but he was a more serious thinker than either his contemporaries or later scholars have acknowledged. This book provides a major reassessment of Keats's intellectual life by considering his engagement with a formidable body of eighteenth-century thought from the work of Voltaire, Robertson, and Gibbon to Hutcheson, Hume, and Smith. The book re-examines some of Keats's most important poems, including The Eve of St Agnes, Hyperion, Lamia, and Ode to Psyche, in the light of a range of Enlightenment ideas and contexts from literary history and cultural progress to anthropology, political economy, and moral philosophy. By demonstrating that the language and ideas of the Enlightenment played a key role in establishing his poetic agenda, Keats's poetry is shown to be less the expression of an intuitive young genius than the product of the cultural and intellectual contexts of his time. Key Features:*The first book-length consideration of the relationship between Keats and the ideas of the Enlightenment*New and distinctive argument about Keats reassessing his intellectual life and contexts*Contributes to our understanding of the relationship between the Romantic period and the eighteenth century/Enlightenment, currently one of the most important debates in literary scholarship*Wide appeal to scholars, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates of eighteenth-century and Romantic period literature, history and philosophy; cultural and intellectual historians; historians of ideas
Main Description
John Keats is generally considered to be the least intellectually sophisticated of all the major Romantic poets, but he was a more serious thinker than either his contemporaries or later scholars have acknowledged. This innovative study provides a major reassessment of Keats's intellectual life by considering his often overlooked engagement with a formidable body of eighteenth-century thought from the work of historians such as Robertson and Gibbon to philosophers such as Hume, Smith and Voltaire. The book re-examines some of Keats's most important poems, including The Eve of St Agnes, Hyperion, Ode to Psyche and Lamia, in the light of a wide range of eighteenth-century ideas and contexts from literary history and cultural progress to anthropology, economics and political theory. By demonstrating that the language and ideas of the Enlightenment played a key role in establishing his poetic agenda, Keats's poetry is shown to be less the expression of an intuitive boy genius than the product of the cultural and intellectual contexts of his time. The combination of historical context and textual analysis makes this book of interest to students of cultural and intellectual history, as well as to literary scholars.Key Features:*The first book-length consideration of the relationship between Keats and the ideas of the Enlightenment*New and distinctive argument about Keats reassessing his intellectual life and contexts*Contributes to our understanding of the relationship between the Romantic period and the eighteenth century/Enlightenment, currently one of the most important debates in literary scholarship*Wide appeal to scholars, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates of eighteenth-century and Romantic period literature, history and philosophy; cultural and intellectual historians; historians of ideas
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Abbreviationsp. viii
Introduction: Keats, Enlightenment and Romanticismp. 1
Ancients and Moderns: Literary History and the 'Grand March of Intellect' in Keats's Letters and the 1817 Poemsp. 17
Civil Society: Sentimental History and Enlightenment Socialisation in Endymion and The Eve of St. Agnesp. 39
The Science of Man: Anthropological Speculation and Stadial Theory in Hyperionp. 65
Political Economy: Commerce, Civic Tradition and the Luxury Debate in Isabella and Lamiap. 97
Moral Philosophy: Sympathetic Identification, Utility and the Natural History of Religion in The Fall of Hyperionp. 121
Afterword: Ode to Psyche and Ode on a Grecian Urnp. 151
Notesp. 159
Bibliographyp. 191
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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