Catalogue


Islamic conversion and Christian resistance on the early modern stage [electronic resource] /
Jane Hwang Degenhardt.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
description
viii, 264 p. : ill., maps, ports.
ISBN
0748640843 (hbk.), 9780748640843 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
isbn
0748640843 (hbk.)
9780748640843 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8412537
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Incisively arguing that conversion to Islam brought to a crisis English ambivalence about the Protestant emphasis on disembodiment and immateriality in religious life, Islamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Renaissance Stage brilliantly explores how "turning Turk" was simultaneously understood in religious, sexual, and proto-racial terms in the early modern period. Elegantly written and vividly illustrated, Degenhardt's book links early modern and medieval conversion narratives and canonical and less canonical plays to provide a strikingly original account of why Islamic conversion was so important to early modern thought and why the stage was such a rich site for its exploration.
Incisively arguing that conversion to Islam brought to a crisis English ambivalence about the Protestant emphasis on disembodiment and immateriality in religious life, this book brilliantly explores how "turning Turk" was simultaneously understood in religious, sexual, and proto-racial terms in the early modern period. Elegantly written and vividly illustrated, Degenhardt's book links early modern and medieval conversion narratives and canonical and less canonical plays to provide a strikingly original account of why Islamic conversion was so important to early modern thought and why the stage was such a rich site for its exploration.
Incisively arguing that conversion to Islam brought to a crisis English ambivalence about the Protestant emphasis on disembodiment and immateriality in religious life, this book brilliantly explores how "turning Turk" was simultaneously understood in religious, sexual, and proto-racial terms in the early modern period. Elegantly written and vividly illustrated, Degenhardt's book links early modern and medieval conversion narratives with canonical and less canonical plays to provide a strikingly original account of why Islamic conversion was so important to early modern thought and why the stage was such a rich site for its exploration.
This is a strong, exciting, and original book. Degenhardt draws deeply on contemporary sermons, ecclesiastical debates, news pamphlets, and travel literature alongside a wide range of plays in order to give a complex and lively picture of the cultures of controversy in Renaissance England.
This is a strong, exciting, and original book. Jane Hwang Degenhardt draws deeply on contemporary sermons, ecclesiastical debates, news pamphlets, and travel literature alongside a wide range of plays in order to give a complex and lively picture of the cultures of controversy in Renaissance England.
"Incisively arguing that conversion to Islam brought to a crisis English ambivalence about the Protestant emphasis on disembodiment and immateriality in religious life, this book brilliantly explores how 'turning Turk' was simultaneously understood in religious, sexual, and proto-racial terms in the early modern period. Elegantly written and vividly illustrated, Degenhardt's book links early modern and medieval conversion narratives with canonical and less canonical plays to provide a strikingly original account of why Islamic conversion was so important to early modern thought and why the stage was such a rich site for its exploration." -- Jean E. Howard, George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University
"This is a strong, exciting, and original book. Degenhardt draws deeply on contemporary sermons, ecclesiastical debates, news pamphlets, and travel literature alongside a wide range of plays in order to give a complex and lively picture of the cultures of controversy in Renaissance England." -- Julia Reinhard Lupton, Professor of English, The University of California, Irvine
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
BLURB HAS BEEN SUPERSEDEDSEEKING TWO COVER ENDORSEMENTSIslamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern StageJane Hwang DegenhardtThis critical monograph explores the spectre of Christian conversion to Islam in early modern British drama, linking canonical works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Webster with less canonical plays by Massinger, Dekker, and others.Situating British theatre in a global context, it looks at how East-West power dynamics informed representations of identity, embodiment, and race. In particular, this study examines the stage's treatment of religious conversion as a sexual seduction, showing how gender was a key variable in exposing interconnections between conversion to Islam and racial reinscription. It also focuses on how confessional identities fused into racial categories, to offer a unique approach to discussions of race in the early modern period.In addition, this study is concerned with how the threat of Christian conversion to Islam was framed within a domestic culture of Protestant reform. It looks at how the Renaissance stage re-empowered surprisingly Catholic models of Christian resistance to Islam and demonstrates how the stage refigured medieval models from saints tales, martyrologies, and romances to address Renaissance concerns about commerce, global politics, and interfaith contact. In effect, this book maps a conjunction between post-Reformation controversies over the embodied nature of Christian faith and the early modern history of race.Jane Hwang Degenhardt is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the co-editor (with Elizabeth Williamson) of Religion and Drama in Early Modern England.
Back Cover Copy
SEEKING TWO COVER ENDORSEMENTSIslamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern StageJane Hwang DegenhardtThis critical monograph explores the spectre of Christian conversion to Islam in early modern British drama, linking canonical works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Webster with less canonical plays by Massinger, Dekker, and others.Situating British theatre in a global context, it looks at how East-West power dynamics informed representations of identity, embodiment, and race. In particular, this study examines the stage's treatment of religious conversion as a sexual seduction, showing how gender was a key variable in exposing interconnections between conversion to Islam and racial reinscription. It also focuses on how confessional identities fused into racial categories, to offer a unique approach to discussions of race in the early modern period.In addition, this study is concerned with how the threat of Christian conversion to Islam was framed within a domestic culture of Protestant reform. It looks at how the Renaissance stage re-empowered surprisingly Catholic models of Christian resistance to Islam and demonstrates how the stage refigured medieval models from saints tales, martyrologies, and romances to address Renaissance concerns about commerce, global politics, and interfaith contact. In effect, this book maps a conjunction between post-Reformation controversies over the embodied nature of Christian faith and the early modern history of race.Jane Hwang Degenhardt is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the co-editor (with Elizabeth Williamson) of Religion and Drama in Early Modern England.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, & Massinger, conversion from Christianity to Islam is portrayed as both a fate worse than death and a sexual seduction. Degenhardt examines the stage's treatment of this intercourse of faiths to reveal connections between sexuality, race, & confessional identity in early modern English drama & culture.
Description for Reader
This book explores the theme of Christian conversion to Islam in 12 early-modern English plays by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Massinger and others. In these works, conversion from Christianity to Islam is represented as both erotic and tragic: as a sexual seduction and a fate worse than death.Degenhardt examines the theatre's treatment of the intercourse between the Christian and Islamic faiths to reveal connections between sexuality, race and confessional identity in early modern English drama and culture. In addition, she shows how England's encounter with Islam reanimated post-Reformation debates about the embodiment of Christian faith. As Degenhardt compellingly demonstrates, the erotics of conversion added fuel to the fires of controversies over Pauline universalism, Christian martyrdom, the efficacy of relics and rituals and the ideals of the Knights of Malta.
Description for Teachers/Educators
Renaissance Literature; Early Modern Literature; Early Modern Religion; Early Modern Drama; Shakespeare; Religious History; The Reformation; Postcolonial Studies; History of Race; Gender Studies; Theatre History; Art History
Main Description
Jane Hwang investigates the specter of Christian conversion to Islam, which played a major role in early modern British drama. She considers how East-West power dynamics informed representations of identity, embodiment, and race, and examines the stage's treatment of religious conversion to Islam as a sexual seduction. She also demonstrates how Christian resistance to conversion re-empowered Catholic models during a period of Protestant reform, using the stories of saints and martyrs to revive Renaissance concerns about commerce, global politics, and interfaith contact. Hwang's fascinating connections between Shakespeare, Marlowe, Webster, Massinger, Dekker, and other playwrights outlines a significant relationship between post-Reformation controversies over the embodied nature of Christianity and early modern histories of race.
Main Description
This book explores the spectre of Christian conversion to Islam in twelve early modern English plays. In works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Massinger, and others, conversion from Christianity to Islam is represented as both tragic and erotic - a fate worse than death as well as a sexual seduction. Degenhardt examines the stage's treatment of this intercourse of faiths to reveal connections between sexuality, race, and confessional identity in early modern English drama and culture. In addition, she shows how England's encounter with Islam reanimated post-Reformation debates about the embodiment of Christian faith. As Degenhardt compellingly demonstrates, the erotics of conversion added fuel to the fires of controversies over Pauline universalism, Christian martyrdom, the efficacy of relics and rituals, and the ideals of the Knights of Malta.
Main Description
This book explores the theme of Christian conversion to Islam in 12 early-modern English plays by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Massinger and others. In these works, conversion from Christianity to Islam is represented as both erotic and tragic: as a sexual seduction and a fate worse than death. Degenhardt examines the theatre's treatment of the intercourse between the Christian and Islamic faiths to reveal connections between sexuality, race and confessional identity in early modern English drama and culture. In addition, she shows how England's encounter with Islam reanimated post-Reformation debates about the embodiment of Christian faith. As Degenhardt compellingly demonstrates, the erotics of conversion added fuel to the fires of controversies over Pauline universalism, Christian martyrdom, the efficacy of relics and rituals and the ideals of the Knights of Malta.
Main Description
This book explores the threat of Christian conversion to Islam in twelve early-modern English plays. In works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Massinger and others, conversion from Christianity to Islam is represented as both tragic and erotic: as a fate worse than death and as a sexual seduction. Degenhardt examines the stage's treatment of this intercourse of faiths to reveal connections between sexuality, race and confessional identity in early modern English drama and culture. In addition, she shows how England's encounter with Islam reanimated post-Reformation debates about the embodiment of Christian faith. As Degenhardt compellingly demonstrates, the erotics of conversion added fuel to the fires of controversies over Pauline universalism, Christian martyrdom, the efficacy of relics and rituals and even the Knights of Malta.
Main Description
This critical monograph explores the spectre of Christian conversion to Islam in early modern British drama, linking canonical works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Webster with less canonical plays by Massinger, Dekker, and others.Situating British theatre in a global context, it looks at how East-West power dynamics informed representations of identity, embodiment, and race. In particular, this study examines the stage's treatment of religious conversion as a sexual seduction, showing how gender was a key variable in exposing interconnections between conversion to Islam and racial reinscription. It also focuses on how confessional identities fused into racial categories, to offer a unique approach to discussions of race in the early modern period.In addition, this study is concerned with how the threat of Christian conversion to Islam was framed within a domestic culture of Protestant reform. It looks at how the Renaissance stage re-empowered surprisingly Catholic models of Christian resistance to Islam and demonstrates how the stage refigured medieval models from saints tales, martyrologies, and romances to address Renaissance concerns about commerce, global politics, and interfaith contact. In effect, this book maps a conjunction between post-Reformation controversies over the embodied nature of Christian faith and the early modern history of race.

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