Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Imperial ideology and provincial loyalty in the Roman Empire [electronic resource] /
Clifford Ando.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
description
xxi, 494 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520220676 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
isbn
0520220676 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8412286
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 413-449) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Ando's intellectually daring work breaks through the traditional perceptions of Roman religion under the empire."--Guy Stroumsa, author of Barbarian Philosophy: The Religious Revolution of Early Christianity "A work of innovative spirit and great learning, stylishly argued throughout and beautifully written."--Sabine MacCormack, author of The Shadows of Poetry: Virgil in the Mind of Augustine
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-06-01:
Ando's book sets Edward Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire on its head. The central question is not why the Roman Empire fell, but why it lasted so long. It held the loyalty of a vast number of peoples over a multicultural domain until it fell prey to rot from the center, and even then, the Digest of Justinian, written when Rome was a city of ruined monuments, could affirm that Rome was the "common homeland" of "us all." Ando has produced an impressive work of great breadth. It falls into three parts. The first deals with Roman imperial ideology. The second describes communication between the emperor and his subjects, and how emperors promoted the perceptions of themselves as defenders of the aspirations of their subjects. Part 3 deals with the evolution of Rome from an "Empire" (imperium) to a "Father1and" (patria) in the minds of Roman citizens, and the shift in the perception of the exalted position of the emperor from a ruler with the constitutional trappings of republican magistrate to the exalted position of a Byzantine emperor. This is a book worth patient study. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. A. S. Evans emeritus, University of British Columbia
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text examines why and how the Roman empire lasted so long. In studying the bureaucracy behind it, the author argues that the longevity of the empire rested not on military power but on a gradually realized consensus that Roman rule was justified.
Long Description
The Roman empire remains unique. Although Rome claimed to rule the world, it did not. Rather, its uniqueness stems from the culture it created and the loyalty it inspired across an area that stretched from the Tyne to the Euphrates. Moreover, the empire created this culture with a bureaucracy smaller than that of a typical late-twentieth-century research university. In approaching this problem, Clifford Ando does not ask the ever-fashionable question, Why did the Roman empire fall? Rather, he asks, Why did the empire last so long? Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empireargues that the longevity of the empire rested not on Roman military power but on a gradually realized consensus that Roman rule was justified. This consensus was itself the product of a complex conversation between the central government and its far-flung peripheries. Ando investigates the mechanisms that sustained this conversation, explores its contribution to the legitimation of Roman power, and reveals as its product the provincial absorption of the forms and content of Roman political and legal discourse. Throughout, his sophisticated and subtle reading is informed by current thinking on social formation by theorists such as Max Weber, JÜrgen Habermas, and Pierre Bourdieu.
Main Description
Ando describes how the polyglot multicultural world of the Roman empire was made so unoppressive and stable.
Main Description
The Roman empire remains unique. Although Rome claimed to rule the world, it did not. Rather, its uniqueness stems from the culture it created and the loyalty it inspired across an area that stretched from the Tyne to the Euphrates. Moreover, the empire created this culture with a bureaucracy smaller than that of a typical late-twentieth-century research university. In approaching this problem, Clifford Ando does not ask the ever-fashionable question, Why did the Roman empire fall? Rather, he asks, Why did the empire last so long? Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire argues that the longevity of the empire rested not on Roman military power but on a gradually realized consensus that Roman rule was justified. This consensus was itself the product of a complex conversation between the central government and its far-flung peripheries. Ando investigates the mechanisms that sustained this conversation, explores its contribution to the legitimation of Roman power, and reveals as its product the provincial absorption of the forms and content of Roman political and legal discourse. Throughout, his sophisticated and subtle reading is informed by current thinking on social formation by theorists such as Max Weber, Jürgen Habermas, and Pierre Bourdieu.
Main Description
The Roman empire remains unique. Although Rome claimed to rule the world, it did not. Rather, its uniqueness stems from the culture it created and the loyalty it inspired across an area that stretched from the Tyne to the Euphrates. Moreover, the empire created this culture with a bureaucracy smaller than that of a typical late-twentieth-century research university. In approaching this problem, Clifford Ando does not ask the ever-fashionable question, Why did the Roman empire fall? Rather, he asks, Why did the empire last so long? "Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire" argues that the longevity of the empire rested not on Roman military power but on a gradually realized consensus that Roman rule was justified. This consensus was itself the product of a complex conversation between the central government and its far-flung peripheries. Ando investigates the mechanisms that sustained this conversation, explores its contribution to the legitimation of Roman power, and reveals as its product the provincial absorption of the forms and content of Roman political and legal discourse. Throughout, his sophisticated and subtle reading is informed by current thinking on social formation by theorists such as Max Weber, Jurgen Habermas, and Pierre Bourdieu.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Communis Patriap. 1
Ancient and Modern Contextsp. 17
Ideology in the Roman Empirep. 19
The Roman Achievement in Ancient Thoughtp. 49
Consensus and Communicationp. 71
The Communicative Actions of the Roman Governmentp. 73
Consensus in Theory and Practicep. 131
The Creation of Consensusp. 175
Images of Emperor and Empirep. 206
From Imperium to Patriap. 275
Orbis Terrarum and Orbis Romanusp. 277
The King is a Body Politick ... for That a Body Politique Never Diethp. 336
Singulare Et Unicum Imperiump. 406
Works Citedp. 413
General Indexp. 451
Index Locorump. 459
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem