Catalogue


Hesiod's Ascra [electronic resource] /
Anthony T. Edwards.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2004.
description
xii, 208 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520236580 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2004.
isbn
0520236580 (cloth : acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8412123
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-194) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Anthony T. Edwards is Professor in the Department of Literature at the University of California, San Diego.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a significant book for early Greek historians and scholars of Greek literature. It's an original and important argument, and everyone working on archaic Greece will need to read this and take it into consideration."--Ian Morris, author ofArchaeology as Cultural History
Flap Copy
"This is a significant book for early Greek historians and scholars of Greek literature. It's an original and important argument, and everyone working on archaic Greece will need to read this and take it into consideration."--Ian Morris, author of Archaeology as Cultural History
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-07-01:
Edwards (Univ. of California, San Diego) offers an original and largely persuasive interpretation of the social world that lies behind Hesiod's agricultural poem Works and Days, composed in the seventh century BCE. Traditionally scholars imagine Hesiod's world to be composed of small villages, like his hometown of Ascra, which were oppressed by overlords from nearby cities, reflecting an intermediate stage between Homeric society and early Athens as represented by Solon. Edwards, however, argues that in fact the primary contrast in the poem is not between village and city, but rather between the prosperous and the needy within the same community, and that the so-called "kings" had only the role of arbitrators in cases brought before them voluntarily by the villagers. The social organization of Hesiod's Ascra was thus much less developed than that found in Homer. This carefully researched and clearly written book is a welcome contribution to understanding not only Hesiod but the social conditions of the obscure period following Homer and preceding the emergence of the classical Greek city-states. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. P. Nieto Brown University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In 'Work and Days', one of the two long poems that have come down to us from Hesiod, the poet writes of farming, morality and what seems to be a nasty quarrel with his brother Perses over their inheritance.
Long Description
In Works and Days, one of the two long poems that have come down to us from Hesiod, the poet writes of farming, morality, and what seems to be a very nasty quarrel with his brother Perses over their inheritance. In this book, Anthony T. Edwards extracts from the poem a picture of the social structure of Ascra, the hamlet in northern Greece where Hesiod lived, most likely during the seventh century b.c.e. Drawing on the evidence of trade, food storage, reciprocity, and the agricultural regime as Hesiod describes them in Works and Days, Edwards reveals Ascra as an autonomous village, outside the control of a polis, less stratified and integrated internally than what we observe even in Homer. In light of this reading, theconflict between Hesiod and Perses emerges as a dispute about the inviolability of the community's external boundary and the degree of interobligation among those within the village. Hesiod's Ascra directly counters the accepted view of Works and Days, which has Hesiod describing a peasant society subordinated to the economic and political control of an outside elite. Through his deft analysis, Edwards suggests a new understanding of both Works and Days and the social and economic organization of Hesiod's time and place.
Unpaid Annotation
This book uses Hesiod's Works and Days to illuminate power relations, cooperative networks, and economy in early Archaic Greece.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. 1
External Relations: Ascra and Thespiaep. 30
Internal Relations: Ascra as Communityp. 80
The Agricultural Regime of Works and Daysp. 127
The Shape of Hesiod's Ascrap. 159
Persuading Persesp. 176
Works Citedp. 185
Indexp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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