Catalogue


Erotic grotesque nonsense [electronic resource] : the mass culture of Japanese modern times /
Miriam Silverberg.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
description
xviii, 369 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520222733 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520222731 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
isbn
0520222733 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520222731 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Japanese modern times -- Japanese modern within modernity -- Japanese modern sites -- The modern girl as militant (movement on the streets) -- The café waitress sang the blues -- Friends of the movies (from Ero to empire) -- The household becomes modern life -- Asakusa--honky-tonk tempo -- Asakusa eroticism -- Down-and-out grotesquerie -- Modern nonsense.
general note
"A Philip E. Lilienthal book in Asian studies"--Jacket.
catalogue key
8411482
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-343) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A sumptuously documented book, one that makes innovative use of the principle of montage to generate informative historical readings of Japan's myriad mass cultural phenomena in the early twentieth century. Both in terms of its scholarship and its methodology, this is a truly admirable work."--Rey Chow, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities, Brown University "As Miriam Silverberg has brilliantly shown here, the modern times of 1920s and '30s Japan were rendered in a cacophony of cultural mixing: a period of consumerist desires and Hollywood fantasy-making but also the rise of nationalist empire-building. Excavating its kaleidoscope of everyday culture Silverberg astutely offers a theory of montage for how Japanese subjects 'code-switched' in juggling the mixed cultural/political elements of these times. Utilizing a montage of media, texts, sites, and scholarship, Silverberg leads the reader into the terrain of the 'erotic grotesque nonsense' in a work that is as scintillating as it is theoretically important."--Anne Allison, author of Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination "Unlike other scholars who merely view ero-guro-nansensu in its literal meanings, Silverberg brilliantly documents it as a complex cultural aesthetic expressed in a spectrum of fascinating mass culture forms and preoccupations. With great erudition and humor, she traces the sensory and conceptual modes that are animated with potency and sophistication through this cultural metaphor. This book is destined to be a classic in Japan scholarship."--Laura Miller, author of Beauty Up: Exploring Contemporary Japanese Body Aesthetics
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Leaves the reader longing to know more, and regretting that the author is no longer here to help us satisfy that wish."
"Leaves the reader longing to know more, and regretting that the author is no longer here to help us satisfy that wish."-- Japanese Studies
"This is a book not just for Japan specialists, but for anyone interested in a history of cosmopolitism and modern life."
"This is a book not just for Japan specialists, but for anyone interested in a history of cosmopolitism and modern life."-- Journal Royal Anthro Inst
"This is a book not just for Japan specialists, but for anyone interested in a history of cosmopolitism and modern life."-- Jrnl Royal Anthro Inst
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This history of Japanese mass culture during the decades preceding Pearl Harbor argues that the new gestures, relationship, and humor of ero-guro-nansensu (erotic grotesque nonsense) expressed a self-consciously modern ethos that challenged state ideology and expansionism. Miriam Silverberg uses sources such as movie magazines, ethnographies of the homeless, and the most famous photographs from this era to capture the spirit, textures, and language of a time when the media reached all classes, connecting the rural social order to urban mores. Employing the concept of montage as a metaphor that informed the organization of Japanese mass culture during the 1920s and 1930s, Silverberg challenges the erasure of Japanese colonialism and its legacies. She evokes vivid images from daily life during the 1920s and 1930s, including details about food, housing, fashion, modes of popular entertainment, and attitudes toward sexuality. Her innovative study demonstrates how new public spaces, new relationships within the family, and an ironic sensibility expressed the attitude of Japanese consumers who identified with the modern as providing a cosmopolitan break from tradition at the same time that they mobilized for war.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Employing the concept of montage as a metaphor that informed the organization of Japanese mass culture during the 1920s and 1930s, this work challenges the erasure of Japanese colonialism and its legacies.
Long Description
This history of Japanese mass culture during the decades preceding Pearl Harbor argues that the new gestures, relationship, and humor ofero-guro-nansensu(erotic grotesque nonsense) expressed a self-consciously modern ethos that challenged state ideology and expansionism. Miriam Silverberg uses sources such as movie magazines, ethnographies of the homeless, and the most famous photographs from this era to capture the spirit, textures, and language of a time when the media reached all classes, connecting the rural social order to urban mores. Employing the concept of montage as a metaphor that informed the organization of Japanese mass culture during the 1920s and 1930s, Silverberg challenges the erasure of Japanese colonialism and its legacies. She evokes vivid images from daily life during the 1920s and 1930s, including details about food, housing, fashion, modes of popular entertainment, and attitudes toward sexuality. Her innovative study demonstrates how new public spaces, new relationships within the family, and an ironic sensibility expressed the attitude of Japanese consumers who identified with the modern as providing a cosmopolitan break from tradition at the same time that they mobilized for war.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
By Way of a Prefacep. xv
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
Japanese Modern Times
Japanese Modern within Modernityp. 13
Placing the Consumer-Subject within Mass Culturep. 20
Erotic Grotesque Nonsense as Montagep. 28
Japanese Modern Culture as Politicsp. 35
The Documentary Impulsep. 38
Japanese Modern Sites
The Modern Girl as Militant (Movement on the Streets)p. 51
Identifying the Modern Girlp. 52
What Did She Do?p. 65
What Made the Modern Girl Do What She Did?p. 69
The Cafe Waitress Sang the Bluesp. 73
Eroticizing the Modern Japanese Cafe Waitressp. 75
Documenting the Cafe Waitressp. 90
"A New Study of the Everyday Life of the Cafe Waitress"p. 91
"A Close Look at Ginza"p. 98
"Tale of Wandering"p. 102
How the Japanese Cafe Waitress Sang the Bluesp. 105
Friends of the Movies (From Ero to Empire)p. 108
Erop. 109
Ero at the Moviesp. 117
Toward Empirep. 122
The Household Becomes Modern Lifep. 143
The Family-State of "Shufu no Tomo"p. 145
Wives and Husbands (the Shufu in Fufu)p. 147
The Fufu in Discord/Household in Discordp. 151
Women at Workp. 154
Modern Times for the Housewifep. 162
Asakusa - Honky-Tonk Tempo
Asakusa Eroticismp. 177
Gonda Yasunoke's Asakusa (an Official View)p. 179
Soeda Azenbo's Asakusap. 183
Kawabata Yasunari's Asakusap. 188
Hollywood as Fantasyp. 195
Ozaki Midori (Love for a Cane and a Hat)p. 200
Down-and-Out Grotesqueriep. 203
Beggar Culturep. 206
Vagrant Culturep. 209
Juvenile Delinquentsp. 217
The Hawkersp. 223
Foreigners as Freaksp. 227
Modern Nonsensep. 231
The Irony of Parodyp. 232
The "Casino Folies" Affirms the Falsep. 235
Letting Go of the Modern - Charlie Left Behindp. 253
Freeze Frames (An Epilogue in Montage)p. 259
Tempo (1931)p. 259
Gestures (1932)p. 259
Code Switch (1936)p. 260
The Parody of Comedy (1940)p. 262
Asakusa Memories (the 1970s and 1980s)p. 265
The Return of the Modern Girl (the 1990s)p. 267
Giving the Modern Girl Her Duep. 268
The Endp. 268
List of Abbreviationsp. 271
Notesp. 273
Bibliographyp. 327
Indexp. 345
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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