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The emancipation of writing [electronic resource] : German civil society in the making, 1790s-1820s /
Ian F. McNeely.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2003.
description
xii, 329 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0520233301 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2003.
isbn
0520233301 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8411357
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-323) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A superbly crafted major intervention into the hotly contested issue of German civil society - its origins, formation, and fate. McNeely turns the tables on deconstructive approaches to formalism in writing and shows how writing was thoroughly implicated in state power and corporate culture."--David Sabean, author ofKinship in Neckarhausen, 1700-1870 "This work's use of archival evidence to overhaul grand theory puts it in a league of its own. McNeely crafts a startlingly original argument about the inventions of citizenship and of modern political culture. It will be required if unsettling reading for anyone pondering the legacies of Tocqueville, Habermas, or Foucault."--Richard Biernacki, author ofThe Fabrication of Labor: Germany and Britain, 1640-1914
Flap Copy
"A superbly crafted major intervention into the hotly contested issue of German civil society - its origins, formation, and fate. McNeely turns the tables on deconstructive approaches to formalism in writing and shows how writing was thoroughly implicated in state power and corporate culture."--David Sabean, author of Kinship in Neckarhausen, 1700-1870 "This work's use of archival evidence to overhaul grand theory puts it in a league of its own. McNeely crafts a startlingly original argument about the inventions of citizenship and of modern political culture. It will be required if unsettling reading for anyone pondering the legacies of Tocqueville, Habermas, or Foucault."--Richard Biernacki, author of The Fabrication of Labor: Germany and Britain, 1640-1914
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Stitching together micro- and macro-level analysis, this text reconstructs the vibrant, textually saturated civic culture of the German southwest in the aftermath of the French Revolution and Napoleon's invasions.
Long Description
The Emancipation of Writing is the first study of writing in its connection to bureaucracy, citizenship, and the state in Germany. Stitching together micro- and macro-level analysis, it reconstructs the vibrant, textually saturated civic culture of the German southwest in the aftermath of the French Revolution and Napoleon's invasions. Ian F. McNeely reveals that Germany's notoriously oppressive bureaucracy, when viewed through the writing practices that were its lifeblood, could also function as a site of citizenship. Citizens, acting under the mediation of powerful local scribes, practiced their freedoms in written engagements with the state. Their communications laid the basis for civil society, showing how social networks commonly associated with the free market, the free press, and the voluntary association could also take root in powerful state institutions.
Main Description
A path-breaking reassessment of the relations between state and citizen in Germany during the transition from premodern to modern society.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Official Power and the Paper Trail
The Civic Landscapep. 13
The Tutelage of the Scribesp. 35
The Black Forest Cahierp. 67
Constitutional Fetishismp. 96
Inscribing a Space of Freedom
Transcending "Textual Serfdom"p. 129
Reading, Writing, and Reformp. 165
Cataloging the Social Worldp. 198
The Intelligence Gazettesp. 220
Conclusionp. 239
Glossaryp. 247
Abbreviatonsp. 249
Notesp. 253
Sourcesp. 303
Indexp. 325
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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