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Cultural politics in Polybius's Histories [electronic resource] /
Craige B. Champion.
imprint
Berkeley ; London : University of California Press, c2004.
description
xv, 331 p.
ISBN
0520237641 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley ; London : University of California Press, c2004.
isbn
0520237641 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8410979
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-282) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Smart and sophisticated. A work that is simultaneously a sensitive study of a major Greek historian and a probing analysis of the Greco-Roman society in which his history was produced."--John Marincola, author ofAuthority and Tradition in Ancient Historiography
Flap Copy
"Smart and sophisticated. A work that is simultaneously a sensitive study of a major Greek historian and a probing analysis of the Greco-Roman society in which his history was produced."--John Marincola, author of Authority and Tradition in Ancient Historiography
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-04-01:
Polybius of Megalopolis, the great neglected historian of ancient Greece, had a unique front-row seat for observing Roman imperialism. A prominent statesman in the southern Greek federation of cities called the Achaean League, he was one of one thousand Achaeans suspected of sympathy for Rome's enemy, Perseus, the last king of Macedonia, and deported to Italy after Rome's conquest of Macedonia. There Polybius became friends with the Romans who directed Roman policy in the second century BCE. His Universal History, covering 220-144 BCE, is based on his experience. Polybius admired Rome for its stability and power, but he remained a Greek, for whom the Romans represented the barbarian world. Champion (Syracuse Univ.) sensitively examines Polybius's attitudes. Particularly important are his chapters on the cultural politics of Hellenism; political constitutions based on Polybius's sixth book, which survives only in fragments; and Roman and Achaean virtues and their degeneration. Roman-Achaean League relations deteriorated into war, and in 146 BCE, Roman troops destroyed Corinth, the league's chief city, and massacred the Corinthian soldiers. Polybius witnessed it. This is a book of splendid scholarship. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students and faculty. J. A. S. Evans emeritus, University of British Columbia
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2005
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Polybius has provided us with the earliest continuous narrative of the rise of the Roman Empire. Champion shows how Polybius tailored his work for a number of audiences, both his fellow Greeks & the Roman conquerors, affording new insights into a work whose subtlety & complexity have gone largely unrecognised.
Long Description
Polybius was a Greek statesman and political prisoner of Rome in the second century b.c.e. His Histories provide the earliest continuous narrative of the rise of the Roman Empire. In this original study informed by recent work in cultural studies and on ethnicity, Craige Champion demonstrates that Polybius's work performs a literary and political balancing act of heretofore unappreciated subtlety and interest. Champion shows how Polybius contrived to tailor his historiography for multiple audiences, comprising his fellow Greeks, whose freedom Rome had usurped in his own generation, and the Roman conquerors. Champion focuses primarily on the ideological presuppositions and predispositions of Polybius's different audiences in order to interpret the apparent contradictions and incongruities in his text. In this way he develops a "politics of cultural indeterminacy" in which Polybius's collective representations of political and ethnic groups have different meanings for different audiences in different contexts. Situating these representations in the ideological, political, and historical contexts from which they arose, his book affords new and penetrating insights into a work whose subtlety and complexity have gone largely unrecognized.
Long Description
Polybius was a Greek statesman and political prisoner of Rome in the second century b.c.e. HisHistoriesprovide the earliest continuous narrative of the rise of the Roman Empire. In this original study informed by recent work in cultural studies and on ethnicity, Craige Champion demonstrates that Polybius's work performs a literary and political balancing act of heretofore unappreciated subtlety and interest. Champion shows how Polybius contrived to tailor his historiography for multiple audiences, comprising his fellow Greeks, whose freedom Rome had usurped in his own generation, and the Roman conquerors. Champion focuses primarily on the ideological presuppositions and predispositions of Polybius's different audiences in order to interpret the apparent contradictions and incongruities in his text. In this way he develops a "politics of cultural indeterminacy" in which Polybius's collective representations of political and ethnic groups have different meanings for different audiences in different contexts. Situating these representations in the ideological, political, and historical contexts from which they arose, his book affords new and penetrating insights into a work whose subtlety and complexity have gone largely unrecognized.
Unpaid Annotation
"Smart and sophisticated. A work that is simultaneously a sensitive study of a major Greek historian and a probing analysis of the Greco-Roman society in which his history was produced."--John Marincola, author of "Authority and Tradition in Ancient Historiography"
Unpaid Annotation
The book significantly expands our understanding of Polybius, the most important historian of the Greek experience after Herodotus and Thucydides. Champion provides a fresh approach, informed by recent work in cultural studies and on ethnicity, to the historical writings of this Greek statesman and political prisoner of Rome in the second century BCE.
Table of Contents
Cultural Politics in Polybius's Historiesp. i
Popular Politics and the English Reformationp. iii
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Historical and Historiographical Contextsp. 13
Political Subordination and Indirect Historiographyp. 15
The Cultural Politics of Hellenismp. 30
Text and Narrativep. 65
Book 6, Rome, and Hellenismp. 67
Roman and Achaean Virtuesp. 100
Roman and Achaean Degeneration in the Fragmentary Booksp. 144
Ideological and Political Contextsp. 171
Collective Representations and Ideological Contextsp. 173
Practical Contexts and Political Realitiesp. 204
Conclusionp. 235
Polybian Ochlocracy and Polybian Barbarologyp. 241
Barbaro¿ in Polybius's Historiesp. 245
¿o¿i¿mo¿ in Polybius's Historiesp. 255
Bibliographyp. 261
General Indexp. 283
Index Locorump. 305
Index of Polybian Terminologyp. 327
Hellenistic Culture and Societyp. 329
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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