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The city as subject [electronic resource] : Seki Hajime and the reinvention of modern Osaka /
Jeffrey E. Hanes.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
description
xii, 348 p. : ill.
ISBN
0520228499 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
isbn
0520228499 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8410655
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 315-333) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A superbly researched and elegantly written study of Seki Hajime and the 'livable city' in Osaka that he envisioned,The City as Subjectopens up a fascinating world of the conjunctures among commercial policy, economic thought, social reform, and urban planning in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries." --Takashi Fujitani, author ofSplendid Monarchy: Power and Pageantry in Modern Japan "Deftly researched, this intellectual biography depicts Seki Hajime, a remarkable and influential early 20th-century figure who pursued careers in academe, policy making, and as interwar Mayor of Osaka. Hanes presents Hajime as an appealing, cosmopolitan, and iconoclastic character, noting particularly Seki's sense of social responsibility, his pragmatism, his ability to keep in mind the human scale in urban planning, and, by no means least, his aesthetic appreciation of Osaka's urban pleasures."--Laura Hein, coeditor ofCensoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States
Flap Copy
"A superbly researched and elegantly written study of Seki Hajime and the 'livable city' in Osaka that he envisioned, The City as Subject opens up a fascinating world of the conjunctures among commercial policy, economic thought, social reform, and urban planning in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries." --Takashi Fujitani, author of Splendid Monarchy: Power and Pageantry in Modern Japan "Deftly researched, this intellectual biography depicts Seki Hajime, a remarkable and influential early 20th-century figure who pursued careers in academe, policy making, and as interwar Mayor of Osaka. Hanes presents Hajime as an appealing, cosmopolitan, and iconoclastic character, noting particularly Seki's sense of social responsibility, his pragmatism, his ability to keep in mind the human scale in urban planning, and, by no means least, his aesthetic appreciation of Osaka's urban pleasures."--Laura Hein, coeditor of Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-01-01:
Hanes (Univ. of Oregon) examines the impact of late-19th-century European social progressive thought on a modernizing Japan through the life of Seki Hajime (1873-1935), who studied in the West and went on to become, first, an influential political economist and university professor and, then, deputy mayor and mayor of Osaka, Japan's second largest city. Seki's desire to put social progressivism into action by transforming the "City of Smoke" into the "Livable City" proved ultimately unworkable. His plan to reinvent Osaka by developing residential areas for working-class inhabitants of the city was frustrated by greedy landed capitalists around Osaka and by shortsighted bureaucrats in Tokyo. Hanes sheds new light on important topics in the history of modern Japan, particularly the impact of Western social progressivism and the conditions of urban life in interwar Japan. His focus on Osaka is refreshing since almost all existing studies focus on Tokyo and its environs. In addition, the chapter on Seki as a young man is a fascinating portrait of the growth and development of a late-Meiji intellectual. Recommended for academic collections, upper-division undergraduates and above. M. D. Ericson University of Maryland University College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In exploring the career of Seki Hajime, who served as mayor of Japan's second-largest city, Osaka, this text traces the roots of social progressivism in prewar Japan, permitting us to reconceive it as a truly transnational movement.
Long Description
In exploring the career of Seki Hajime (1873-1935), who served as mayor of Japan's second-largest city, Osaka, Jeffrey E. Hanes traces the roots of social progressivism in prewar Japan. Seki, trained as a political economist in the late 1890s, when Japan was focused single-mindedly on "increasing industrial production," distinguished himself early on as a people-centered, rather than a state-centered, national economist. After three years of advanced study in Europe at the turn of the century, during which he engaged Marxism and later steeped himself in the exciting new field of social economics, Seki was transformed into a progressive. The social reformism of Seki and others had its roots in a transnational fellowship of progressives who shared the belief that civilized nations should be able to forge a middle path between capitalism and socialism. Hanes's sweeping study permits us not only to weave social progressivism into the modern Japanese historical narrative but also to reconceive it as a truly transnational movement whose impact was felt across the Pacific as well as the Atlantic.
Main Description
Fascinating narrative about the rise of Osaka, Japan's second-largest city, and of the role played by its mayor, Seki Hajime, who was responsible for overseeing an urban development that was both revolutionary and viable.
Main Description
In exploring the career of Seki Hajime (1873-1935), who served as mayor of Japans second-largest city, Osaka, Jeffrey E. Hanes traces the roots of social progressivism in prewar Japan. Seki, trained as a political economist in the late 1890s, when Japan was focused single-mindedly on "increasing industrial production," distinguished himself early on as a people-centered, rather than a state-centered, national economist. After three years of advanced study in Europe at the turn of the century, during which he engaged Marxism and later steeped himself in the exciting new field of social economics, Seki was transformed into a progressive. The social reformism of Seki and others had its roots in a transnational fellowship of progressives who shared the belief that civilized nations should be able to forge a middle path between capitalism and socialism. Haness sweeping study permits us not only to weave social progressivism into the modern Japanese historical narrative but also to reconceive it as a truly transnational movement whose impact was felt across the Pacific as well as the Atlantic.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Seki Hajime and Social Progressivism in Prewar Japan
A Portrait of the Economist as a Young Man
The People's National Economy
Class and Nation
Toward a Modern Moral Economy
A New Urbanism
The Livable City
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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