Catalogue

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Blasted literature [electronic resource] : Victorian political fiction and the shock of modernism /
Deaglán Ó Donghaile.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2011.
description
xii, 260 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0748640673 (hbk.), 9780748640676 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2011.
isbn
0748640673 (hbk.)
9780748640676 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8410236
 
Includes bibliographical references and index (p. [240]-254) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A remarkable study of the complex circuits of influence between political terror, popular fiction and early modernism, ranging from the nineteenth-century dynamite novel to the shock tactics of Vorticist aesthetics. Theoretically sophisticated and historically nuanced, this rich and compelling book brings fresh insight to our understanding of the fin-de-siècle and its legacies.
At a time when the terrorist has once again become a crucial figure in the contemporary imaginary, this study provides a valuable historical perspective. Tracking the traffic between aesthetic shocks and real explosions from Robert Louis Stevenson to Vorticism, the book promises to send tremors through literary history.
Blasted Literature provocatively shows how modernism's "shock of the new" did not simply explode upon the literary scene in the early-twentieth century but evolved steadily in the pages of penny dreadfuls, popular fiction, and avant-garde periodicals during the three decades prior to the War. Ó Donghaile convincingly demonstrates the inextricability of aesthetics and imperial politics in the turn-of-the-century metropolis.
O'Donghaile's expansive range of material, from popular fiction to manifestos of modernist aesthetes, from radical political journalism to fiction by Henry James, is brought together in productive and interesting ways to continue to revise the rigidly hierarchical and separatist categorising of literature according to the scales of a symbolic capital that is still culturally overdetermined.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Edinburgh Critical Studies in Victorian CultureSeries Editor: Julian WolfreysThis series provides timely revisions of the nineteenth-century's literature, culture, history and identity. Drawing on the most provocative and thoughtful research volumes in the series urge readers to think differently about both Victorian and nineteenth-century studies. Blasted Literature: Victorian Political Fiction and the Shock of Modernism Deaglán Ó DonghaileBlasted Literature argues that Victorian popular fiction and modernism are linked by their treatment and exploitation of the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. By connecting the political vanguards of terrorism to the aesthetic practice of the modernist avant-garde it opens new ground in the study of late Victorian and Edwardian literature. Revealing how terrorism, as a literary theme and as a conceptual phenomenon, impacted upon the writing of this period, Ó Donghaile addresses the ways in which Fenian and anarchist violence - both presences in the popular fictions of the 1880s, 1890s and early 1900s - was translated into modernism's blasts against the inert weight of the literary establishment. Drawing on late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing, Blasted Literature reveals the centrality of terrorism to the literary imagination of the period dating, roughly, from 1880 until 1915, when a range of writers exploited its political shocks for their own artistic ends. By mapping the political and aesthetic connections that bind the shilling shocker more closely to modernism than has hitherto been recognised, this book suggests that the relationship between popular fiction of the late nineteenth century and the modernism of subsequent years can be read as a process of synthesis and exchange rather than as an abrupt parting of the ways between low-brow authors and a subsequent generation of literary élitists. As the author shows, the distinctions between popular and more 'high-brow' literature become less certain when we read modernist literature alongside these earlier mass-market texts. Deaglán Ó Donghaile lectures in nineteenth-century literature at Liverpool Hope University.
Back Cover Copy
ENDORSEMENTS BEING SOUGHTEdinburgh Critical Studies in Victorian CultureSeries Editor: Julian WolfreysDrawing on provocative research, volumes in the series provide timely revisions of the nineteenth-century's literature and culture.Blasted Literature: Victorian Political Fiction and the Shock of Modernism Deagl n “ DonghaileBy connecting Fenian and anarchist violence found in popular fiction from the 1880s to the early 1900s with the avant-garde writing of British modernism, Deagl n “ Donghaile demonstrates that Victorian popular fiction and modernism were directly influenced by the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. For the first time, late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing are brought together in provocative readings of Henry James, R L Stevenson, Joseph Conrad and Wyndham Lewis.Deagl n “ Donghaile lectures in nineteenth-century literature at Liverpool Hope University.
Back Cover Copy
ENDORSEMENTS BEING SOUGHTEdinburgh Critical Studies in Victorian CultureSeries Editor: Julian WolfreysDrawing on provocative research, volumes in the series provide timely revisions of the nineteenth-century's literature and culture.Blasted Literature: Victorian Political Fiction and the Shock of Modernism Deaglán Ó DonghaileBy connecting Fenian and anarchist violence found in popular fiction from the 1880s to the early 1900s with the avant-garde writing of British modernism, Deaglán Ó Donghaile demonstrates that Victorian popular fiction and modernism were directly influenced by the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. For the first time, late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing are brought together in provocative readings of Henry James, R L Stevenson, Joseph Conrad and Wyndham Lewis.Deaglán Ó Donghaile lectures in nineteenth-century literature at Liverpool Hope University.
Description for Reader
By connecting Fenian and anarchist violence found in popular fiction from the 1880s to the early 1900s with the avant-garde writing of British modernism, Deagl n “ Donghaile demonstrates that Victorian popular fiction and modernism were directly influenced by the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. For the first time, late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing are brought together in provocative readings of Henry James, R L Stevenson, Joseph Conrad and Wyndham Lewis. Key Features Extensive original archival research from libraries in the UK, Ireland and the US The first book to examine types of political and literary disruption Reads Henry James, R L Stevenson and Joseph Conrad in new contexts Detailed discussion of Wyndham Lewis's avant-garde Vorticist journal BLAST in chapter 4
Description for Reader
By connecting Fenian and anarchist violence found in popular fiction from the 1880s to the early 1900s with the avant-garde writing of British modernism, Deaglán Ó Donghaile demonstrates that Victorian popular fiction and modernism were directly influenced by the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. For the first time, late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing are brought together in provocative readings of Henry James, R L Stevenson, Joseph Conrad and Wyndham Lewis.Key Features Extensive original archival research from libraries in the UK, Ireland and the US The first book to examine types of political and literary disruption Reads Henry James, R L Stevenson and Joseph Conrad in new contexts Detailed discussion of Wyndham Lewis's avant-garde Vorticist journal BLAST in chapter 4
Description for Reader
Drawing on late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing, Blasted Literature reveals the centrality of terrorism to the literary imagination of the period roughly dating from 1880 until 1915, when a range of writers exploited its political shocks for their own artistic ends. By mapping the political and aesthetic connections that bind the shilling shocker more closely to modernism than has hitherto been recognised, this book suggests that the relationship between popular fiction of the late nineteenth century and the modernism of subsequent years can be read as a process of synthesis and exchange rather than as an abrupt parting of the ways between low-brow authors and a subsequent generation of literary élitists. As the author shows, the distinctions between popular and more 'high-brow' literature become less certain when we read modernist literature alongside these earlier mass-market texts.
Description for Reader
Dynamite novels meet highbrow modernism via the impact of terrorism Between 1880 and 1915, a range of writers exploited terrorism's political shocks for their own artistic ends. Drawing on late-Victorian 'dynamite novels' by authors including Robert Louis Stevenson, Tom Greer and Robert Thynne, radical journals and papers, such as The Irish People , The Torch , Anarchy and Freiheit , and modernist writing from H.G. Wells and Joseph Conrad to the compulsively militant modernism of Wyndham Lewis and the Vorticists, Ó Donghaile maps the political and aesthetic connections that bind the shilling shocker closely to modernism. Key Features Extensive original archival research from libraries in the UK, Ireland and the US The first book to examine types of political and literary disruption Detailed discussion of Wyndham Lewis's avant-garde Vorticist journal BLAST in chapter 4
Description for Teachers/Educators
Victorian Literature; Victorian Popular Fiction; Literature of the 1890s; Literature of the fin de siècle; Twentieth-Century Literature; Modernist Literature; Literature and Terror; Literature and Politics
Description for Teachers/Educators
Victorian Literature; Victorian Popular Fiction; Literature of the 1890s; Literature of the fin de si c≤ Twentieth-Century Literature; Modernist Literature; Literature and Terr∨ Literature and Politics
Main Description
Blasted Literature argues that Victorian popular fiction and modernism are linked by their treatment and exploitation of the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. By connecting the political vanguards of terrorism to the aesthetic practice of the modernist avant-garde it opens new ground in the study of late Victorian and Edwardian literature. Revealing how terrorism, as a literary theme and as a conceptual phenomenon, impacted upon the writing of this period, Ó Donghaile addresses the ways in which Fenian and anarchist violence - both presences in the popular fictions of the 1880s, 1890s and early 1900s - was translated into modernism's blasts against the inert weight of the literary establishment. Drawing on late Victorian "dynamite novels", radical journalism and modernist writing, Blasted Literature reveals the centrality of terrorism to the literary imagination of the period dating, roughly, from 1880 until 1915, when a range of writers exploited its political shocks for their own artistic ends. By mapping the political and aesthetic connections that bind the shilling shocker more closely to modernism than has hitherto been recognised, this book suggests that the relationship between popular fiction of the late nineteenth century and the modernism of subsequent years can be read as a process of synthesis and exchange rather than as an abrupt parting of the ways between low-brow authors and a subsequent generation of literary élitists. As the author shows, the distinctions between popular and more "high-brow" literature become less certain when we read modernist literature alongside these earlier mass-market texts.
Main Description
Blasted Literature argues that Victorian popular fiction and modernism are linked by their treatment and exploitation of the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. By connecting the political vanguards of terrorism to the aesthetic practice of the modernist avant-garde it opens new ground in the study of late Victorian and Edwardian literature. Revealing how terrorism, as a literary theme and as a conceptual phenomenon, impacted upon the writing of this period, i Donghaile addresses the ways in which Fenian and anarchist violence - both presences in the popular fictions of the 1880s, 1890s and early 1900s - was translated into modernism's blasts against the inert weight of the literary establishment. Drawing on late Victorian "dynamite novels", radical journalism and modernist writing, Blasted Literature reveals the centrality of terrorism to the literary imagination of the period dating, roughly, from 1880 until 1915, when a range of writers exploited its political shocks for their own artistic ends. By mapping the political and aesthetic connections that bind the shilling shocker more closely to modernism than has hitherto been recognised, this book suggests that the relationship between popular fiction of the late nineteenth century and the modernism of subsequent years can be read as a process of synthesis and exchange rather than as an abrupt parting of the ways between low-brow authors and a subsequent generation of literary élitists. As the author shows, the distinctions between popular and more "high-brow" literature become less certain when we read modernist literature alongside these earlier mass-market texts.
Main Description
By connecting Fenian and anarchist violence found in popular fiction from the 1880s to the early 1900s with the avant-garde writing of British modernism, Deagl n “ Donghaile demonstrates that Victorian popular fiction and modernism were directly influenced by the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. For the first time, late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing are brought together in provocative readings of Henry James, R L Stevenson, Joseph Conrad and Wyndham Lewis.Key Features*Extensive original archival research from libraries in the UK, Ireland and the US*The first book to examine types of political and literary disruption*Reads Henry James, R L Stevenson and Joseph Conrad in new contexts *Detailed discussion of Wyndham Lewis's avant-garde Vorticist journal BLAST in chapter 4
Main Description
By connecting Fenian and anarchist violence found in popular fiction from the 1880s to the early 1900s with the avant-garde writing of British modernism, Deaglán Ó Donghaile demonstrates that Victorian popular fiction and modernism were directly influenced by the explosive shocks of late nineteenth-century terrorism. For the first time, late-Victorian 'dynamite novels', radical journalism and modernist writing are brought together in provocative readings of Henry James, R L Stevenson, Joseph Conrad and Wyndham Lewis.Key Features*Extensive original archival research from libraries in the UK, Ireland and the US*The first book to examine types of political and literary disruption*Reads Henry James, R L Stevenson and Joseph Conrad in new contexts *Detailed discussion of Wyndham Lewis's avant-garde Vorticist journal BLAST in chapter 4
Main Description
Dynamite novels meet highbrow modernism via the impact of terrorism. Between 1880 and 1915, a range of writers exploited terrorism's political shocks for their own artistic ends. Drawing on late-Victorian 'dynamite novels' by authors including Robert Louis Stevenson, Tom Greer and Robert Thynne, radical journals and papers, such as The Irish People, The Torch, Anarchy and Freiheit, and modernist writing from H.G. Wells and Joseph Conrad to the compulsively militant modernism of Wyndham Lewis and the Vorticists, Donghaile maps the political and aesthetic connections that bind the shilling shocker closely to modernism.
Main Description
Dynamite novels meet highbrow modernism via the impact of terrorism. Between 1880 and 1915, a range of writers exploited terrorism's political shocks for their own artistic ends. Drawing on late-Victorian 'dynamite novels' by authors including Robert Louis Stevenson, Tom Greer and Robert Thynne, radical journals and papers, such as The Irish People, The Torch, Anarchy and Freiheit, and modernist writing from H.G. Wells and Joseph Conrad to the compulsively militant modernism of Wyndham Lewis and the Vorticists, O Donghaile maps the political and aesthetic connections that bind the shilling shocker closely to modernism.
Main Description
Turning to late Victorian "dynamite novels" (or fiction that portrays terrorism), as well as radical journalism and modernist writing, Blasted Literature proves the centrality of terrorism to the literary imagination of 1880 to 1915. During this period, a range of writers exploited the sensational draw of terrorist plotlines, in some cases for the sake of expanding their art, and in other cases, for the sake of enticing their audience. Mapping the political and aesthetic links between "shilling shockers" and the triumphs of modernism, Deagl n Donghaile suggests that the relationship between late-nineteenth-century popular fiction and twentieth-century modernism can be read as a process of synthesis and exchange rather than a fierce split between low-brow and elite authors.
Main Description
Turning to late Victorian "dynamite novels" (or fiction that portrays terrorism), as well as radical journalism and modernist writing, Blasted Literature proves the centrality of terrorism to the literary imagination of 1880 to 1915. During this period, a range of writers exploited the sensational draw of terrorist plotlines, in some cases for the sake of expanding their art, and in other cases, for the sake of enticing their audience. Mapping the political and aesthetic links between "shilling shockers" and the triumphs of modernism, Deaglán Ó Donghaile suggests that the relationship between late-nineteenth-century popular fiction and twentieth-century modernism can be read as a process of synthesis and exchange rather than a fierce split between low-brow and elite authors.
Main Description
Turning to late Victorian "dynamite novels" (or fiction that portrays terrorism), as well as radical journalism and modernist writing, Blasted Literatureproves the centrality of terrorism to the literary imagination of 1880 to 1915. During this period, a range of writers exploited the sensational draw of terrorist plotlines, in some cases for the sake of expanding their art, and in other cases, for the sake of enticing their audience. Mapping the political and aesthetic links between "shilling shockers" and the triumphs of modernism, Deaglán Ó Donghaile suggests that the relationship between late-nineteenth-century popular fiction and twentieth-century modernism can be read as a process of synthesis and exchange rather than a fierce split between low-brow and elite authors.

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