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Beyond the state in rural Uganda [electronic resource] /
Ben Jones.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press for the International African Institute, 2009.
description
xv, 199 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0748635181, 9780748635184
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
added author
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press for the International African Institute, 2009.
isbn
0748635181
9780748635184
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8410180
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ben Jones is a lecturer in development studies at the University of East Anglia. The thesis manuscript, on which the book is based, was awarded the William Robson Memorial Prize by the London School of Economics.
Reviews
Review Quotes
An accessible, intelligent and stimulating account, and a very welcome addition to the literature on Uganda.
… an excellent critique of perspectives focusing on the success of a reform-minded Ugandan state. Jones portrays instead the weakness of central government in the countryside and the deleterious effects of 'external' development schemes. His focus is on change generated from within the local community by the coalescences and interchanges among religious and kin-based associations.
... a refreshing and original antidote to the myopic habits of conventional scholarship... [an] illuminating, astute, against-the-grain study of real-existing development.'
Beyond The State In Rural Uganda is a well-drawn, historically informed, and, for the mostpart, analytically convincing case study of rural Teso in northeastern Uganda in the earlyyears of the twenty-first century.
Beyond the State in Rural Uganda offers a new anthropological perspective on how to think about processes of social and political change in poorer parts of the world, appealing to anyone interested in African development.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using Uganda as an example, Ben Jones argues that scholars too often assume the state to be the most powerful force behind change in rural Africa.
Description for Reader
Download 15% Discount Order Form In this innovative study, Ben Jones argues that scholars too often assume that the state is the most important force behind change in local political communities in Africa. Studies look to the state, and to the impact of government reforms, as ways of understanding processes of development and change. Using the example of Uganda, regarded as one of Africa's few "success stories", Jones chronicles the insignificance of the state and the marginal impact of Western development agencies. Extensive ethnographic fieldwork in a Ugandan village reveals that it is churches, the village court, and organizations based on family and kinships obligations that represent the most significant sites of innovation and social transformation. Groundbreaking and critical in turn, Beyond the State offers a new anthropological perspective on how to think about processes of social and political change in poorer parts of the world. It should appeal to anyone interested in African development. Key Features Offers a new approach to studying development and change Gives a fresh perspective on Christianity in Africa Looks at problems of international development assistance Provides a rich ethnographic rural study from east Africa
Main Description
Ben Jones argues that scholars too often assume that the state is the most important force behind change in local political communities in Africa. Studies look to the state, and to the impact of government reforms, as ways of understanding processes of development and change. Looking to Uganda, believed to be one of Africa's few "success stories," Jones chronicles the low importance of the state and the marginal impact of Western development agencies. Extensive ethnographic fieldwork in a Ugandan village reveals instead that it is churches, the village court, and organizations based on obligations of family and kinship that represent the most significant sites of innovation and social transformation. Groundbreaking and critical, Beyond the State offers a new anthropological perspective on how to think about processes of social and political change in poorer parts of the world.
Main Description
Ben Jones argues that scholars too often assume that the state is the most important force behind change in local political communities in Africa. Studies look to the state, and to the impact of government reforms, as ways of understanding processes of development and change. Looking to Uganda, believed to be one of Africa's few "success stories," Jones chronicles the low importance of the state and the marginal impact of Western development agencies. Extensive ethnographic fieldwork in a Ugandan village reveals instead that it is churches, the village court, and organizations based on obligations of family and kinship that represent the most significant sites of innovation and social transformation. Groundbreaking and critical, Beyond the Stateoffers a new anthropological perspective on how to think about processes of social and political change in poorer parts of the world.
Main Description
In this innovative study, Ben Jones argues that scholars too often assume that the state is the most important force behind change in local political communities in Africa. Studies look to the state, and to the impact of government reforms, as ways of understanding processes of development and change. Using the example of Uganda, regarded as one of Africa's few "success stories", Jones chronicles the insignificance of the state and the marginal impact of Western development agencies. Extensive ethnographic fieldwork in a Ugandan village reveals that it is churches, the village court, and organizations based on family and kinships obligations that represent the most significant sites of innovation and social transformation. Groundbreaking and critical in turn, Beyond the State offers a new anthropological perspective on how to think about processes of social and political change in poorer parts of the world. It should appeal to anyone interested in African development. Key features:*Offers a new approach to studying development and change*Gives a fresh perspective on Christianity in Africa*Looks at problems of international development assistance*Provides a rich ethnographic rural study from east Africa
Main Description
In this innovative study, Jones argues that scholars too often assume the state to be the most powerful force behind change in rural Africa. Using the example of Uganda, regarded as one of Africa's few 'success stories', Jones chronicles the weakness of the state and the marginal impact of Western development assistance. Extensive ethnographic fieldwork in a village reveals that churches, the village court and organisations based on family and kinship obligations represent the most significant sites of innovation and transformation. Beyond the State in Rural Uganda offers a new anthropological perspective on how to think about processes of social and political change. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
List of Maps, Plates and Tablesp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Abbreviationsp. x
Glossaryp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Mapsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
Introducing Oledaip. 13
Teso Society through the Twentieth Centuryp. 31
The Village Court and the Withdrawn Statep. 63
The Pentecostal Churchp. 91
The Anglican and Catholic Churchesp. 111
Burial Societiesp. 133
Conclusionp. 157
Research Methodsp. 167
Interviews and Group Discussionsp. 173
Bibliographyp. 180
Indexp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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