Catalogue


The Abbé Grégoire and the French Revolution [electronic resource] / the making of modern universalism /
Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
description
xi, 341 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520241800 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
isbn
0520241800 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8409696
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 309-327) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-01-01:
Utilizing newly discovered primary sources relevant to Gregoire's intellectual development, Sepinwall (California State Univ., San Marcos) focuses on his association with the major contemporary issues of his time. While identifying this ambitious cleric with radical liberalism during the French Revolution, the author reveals him to be a polarizing figure who alienated friends and foes alike because of his arrogance and contradictory statements. Central to his social philosophy was the concept of moral and physical regeneration; however, he expected others to recognize Catholicism as the key element. Gregoire sought to help Jews while suggesting that their activities were to blame for their condition. A major advocate for the liberation of blacks, he concluded that they would need supervision by Europeans, a factor that would eventually inspire France's civilizing mission. Pointing out repeatedly that Gregoire always blamed others, especially women, for failing to produce his ideal regenerated society, Sepinwall leaves no doubt that he was a confirmed misogynist. For Gregoire, women's place was in the home rather than in politics, for which he believed they had no aptitude. This is a first-rate study of a gifted but flawed individual whose vision for the future never became a reality. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. M. Keefe Saint Joseph's University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2006
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Summaries
Long Description
In this age of globalization, the eighteenth-century priest and abolitionist Henri GrÉgoire has often been called a man ahead of his time. An icon of antiracism, a hero to people from Ho Chi Minh to French Jews, GrÉgoire has been particularly celebrated since 1989, when the French government placed him in the Pantheon as a model of ideals of universalism and human rights. In this beautifully written biography, based on newly discovered and previously overlooked material, we gain access for the first time to the full complexity of GrÉgoire's intellectual and political universe as well as the compelling nature of his persona. His life offers an extraordinary vantage from which to view large issues in European and world history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and provides provocative insights into many of the prevailing tensions, ideals, and paradoxes of the twenty-first century. Focusing on GrÉgoire's idea of "regeneration," that people could literally be made anew, Sepinwall argues that revolutionary universalism was more complicated than it appeared. Tracing the Revolution's long-term legacy, she suggests that while it spread concepts of equality and liberation throughout the world, its ideals also helped to justify colonialism and conquest.
Unpaid Annotation
In this age of globalization, the eighteenth-century priest and abolitionist Henri Gregoire has often been called a man ahead of his time. An icon of antiracism, a hero to people from Ho Chi Minh to French Jews, Gregoire has been particularly celebrated since 1989, when the French government placed him in the Pantheon as a model of ideals of universalism and human rights. In this beautifully written biography, based on newly discovered and previously overlooked material, we gain access for the first time to the full complexity of Gregoire's intellectual and political universe as well as the compelling nature of his persona. His life offers an extraordinary vantage from which to view large issues in European and world history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and provides provocative insights into many of the prevailing tensions, ideals, and paradoxes of the twenty-first century. Focusing on Gregoire's idea of "regeneration," that people could literally be made anew, Sepinwall argues that,revolutionary universalism was more complicated than it appeared. Tracing the Revolution's long-term legacy, she suggests that while it spread concepts of equality and liberation throughout the world, its ideals also helped to justify colonialism and conquest.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Prologue
Regenerating Biography, or In Search of Universalism
Greacute;Goire's Early Years: Enlightenment and Religion in France, 1750-1789
From Tailor's Son to Enlightened Abbeacute;: A Provincial Journey
The "Bon Cureacute;" of Embermeacute;nil
A Physical, Moral, and Political Regeneration of the Jews
Greacute;Goire in Paris: Revolution and Regeneration, 1789-1801
Creating a French Nation
A Religious Revolution? Regeneration Transformed
Overco<$$$>
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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