Catalogue


Weimar film and modern Jewish identity /
Ofer Ashkenazi.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xvi, 234 p.
ISBN
0230341365 (hardback), 9780230341364 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230341365 (hardback)
9780230341364 (hardback)
contents note
Weimar Film and Jewish Acculturation -- The Jews Have no Shame: The "Jewish Tragedy" in Weimar Urban Comedy -- A Man in the Street, a Jew at Home: Identity and Performance in Weimar Domestic Melodramas -- Assimilating the Shrew: Alraune and the Discussion of Biological Difference in Weimar Horror Film -- Wandering Jews: A "Jewish" Solution for Weimar Crisis in Exotic Adventure and War Films -- Epilogue.
abstract
"This book argues that Weimar genre film was a site where the complexities and challenges of Jewish identity were envisioned and negotiated. In reading popular films of the Weimar Republic as candid commentaries on Jewish acculturation, Ofer Ashkenzi provides an alternative context for a re-evaluation of the infamous "German-Jewish symbiosis" before the rise of Nazism, as well as a new framework for the understanding of the German "national" film in the years leading to Hitler's regime"--
catalogue key
8405732
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ofer Ashkenazi is a visiting assistant professor at the University of Minnesota and a fellow of the Koebner-Minerva Center for German History at the the Hebrew University. He is the author of A Walk into the Night: Reason and Subjectivity in Weimar Film.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-05-01:
Ashkenazi (visiting assistant professor, history, Univ. of Minnesota) seeks to redefine the position and contribution of Jewish filmmakers within Weimar film. As is well known, the Weimar period gave birth to some of the greatest examples of German film, and it has also borne great ideological responsibility, as described in Siegfried Kracauer's seminal From Caligari to Hitler (1947). Following the revisionist trend taken by Anton Kaes (Shell Shock Cinema, CH, May'10, 47-4916) and others, Ashkenazi offers here less a universal code for Weimar film, adding a heretofore neglected layer. This is the idea that not only did Jewish filmmakers significantly impact the German film industry, but also in their work articulated and contested the meaning of Jewish identity in the modern world. Against the previously standard reading of Weimar film as obsessed with the German nation, Ashkenazi provides an alternative reading that emphasizes the bourgeois and liberal dreams of these Jewish cultural actors. He argues convincingly that even in popular genre films with no manifest discussion of Jewishness, filmmakers such Ernst Lubitsch, Joe May, and Fritz Lang used visual and narrative strategies to engage with the question of the German-Jewish relationship and of Jewish acculturation and assimilation. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. J. O. Wipplinger North Carolina State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Against the previously standard reading of Weimar film as obsessed with the German nation, Ashkenazi provides an alternative reading that emphasizes the bourgeois and liberal dreams of these Jewish cultural actors. He argues convincingly that even in popular genre films with no manifest discussion of Jewishness, filmmakers such Ernst Lubitsch, Joe May, and Fritz Lang used visual and narrative strategies to engage with the question of the German-Jewish relationship and of Jewish acculturation and assimilation. Summing Up: Highly recommended." - CHOICE "Contributing a new perspective on Weimar film is no small feat, considering the formidable array of books on the subject, from classic works by Lotte Eisner and Siegfried Kracauer to more recent studies by Thomas Elsaesser and Anton Kaes. Ashkenazi's book, however, is extremely readable and engaging, and offers analyses of Weimar films often neglected. This, along with his unique focus on the link between processes of Jewish identity formation and cinema, allows Ashkenazi to contribute a fresh perspective to Weimar film scholarship." - German History "Outstanding . . . Ashkenazi combines a historian's attention to context and archival research with a film studies scholar's attention to cinematic aesthetics to construct a convincing and well-told narrative of the interplay between the Jewish experience on the screens and on the streets of Weimar Germany." - H-Net Reviews
"Contributing a new perspective on Weimar film is no small feat, considering the formidable array of books on the subject, from classic works by Lotte Eisner and Siegfried Kracauer to more recent studies by Thomas Elsaesser and Anton Kaes. Ashkenazi's book, however, is extremely readable and engaging, and offers analyses of Weimar films often neglected. This, along with his unique focus on the link between processes of Jewish identity formation and cinema, allows Ashkenazi to contribute a fresh perspective to Weimar film scholarship." - German History "Outstanding . . . Ashkenazi combines a historian's attention to context and archival research with a film studies scholar's attention to cinematic aesthetics to construct a convincing and well-told narrative of the interplay between the Jewish experience on the screens and on the streets of Weimar Germany." - H-Net Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In reading popular films of the Weimar Republic as candid commentaries on Jewish acculturation, Ashkenzi provides an alternative context for a re-evaluation of the infamous 'German-Jewish symbiosis' before the rise of Nazism.
Description for Bookstore
This book argues that Weimar genre film was a site where the complexities and challenges of Jewish identity were envisioned and negotiated
Library of Congress Summary
"This book argues that Weimar genre film was a site where the complexities and challenges of Jewish identity were envisioned and negotiated. In reading popular films of the Weimar Republic as candid commentaries on Jewish acculturation, Ofer Ashkenzi provides an alternative context for a re-evaluation of the infamous "German-Jewish symbiosis" before the rise of Nazism, as well as a new framework for the understanding of the German "national" film in the years leading to Hitler's regime"--
Main Description
In reading popular films of the Weimar Republic as candid commentaries on Jewish acculturation, Ofer Ashkenzi provides an alternative context for a re-evaluation of the infamous "German-Jewish symbiosis" before the rise of Nazism, as well as a new framework for the understanding of the German "national" film in the years leading to Hitler's regime.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Weimar Film and Jewish Acculturationp. 1
The Jews Have No Shame: The "Jewish Tragedy" in Weimar Urban Comediesp. 17
A Man in The Street, a Jew at Home: Identity and Performance in Weimar Domestic Melodramasp. 43
Assimilating the Shrew: Alraune and the Discussion of Biological Difference in Weimar Horror Filmp. 77
Wandering Jews: A "Jewish" Solution to the German Crisis in Weimar Exotic Adventure and War Filmsp. 111
Epiloguep. 149
Notesp. 155
Bibliogmphyp. 203
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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