Catalogue


The press march to war : newspapers set the stage for military intervention in post-World War II America /
Steve Hallock.
imprint
New York : Peter Lang, c2012.
description
xviii, 293 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1433113759 (Paper), 9781433113758 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Peter Lang, c2012.
isbn
1433113759 (Paper)
9781433113758 (Paper)
contents note
The hardest decision -- Democracy takes its stand -- In defense of our own freedom -- Age of nondeclared wars -- No more Vietnams? -- Martyrs without purpose -- Harder to get out than get in -- Reluctant warriors -- A call to war -- A conflict without end.
catalogue key
8405549
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-277 and index.
A Look Inside
First Chapter
The 2003 war against Iraq was not the first instance of a president taking the nation into foreign conflict assisted by a submissive Congress and national press corps that did not adequately challenge the case for intervention. All foreign U.S. military action since World War II has been undertaken without the constitutionally required declaration of war, and with the support of the national press corps. Factors behind this press complicity—which is at odds with the traditional press role of watchdog over government policies—include political, economic, and national security ideologies the press shares with administration and government officials—the same sources upon whom the press relies for credible information. Sending troops to fight in foreign lands is the most difficult, and most important, decision a president can make. Assisting this decision has been a press that, in failing to meet its watchdog responsibility during this key pre-war period, has instead helped construct and maintain a war agenda. With a comprehensive overview of all conflicts from the Korean War to intervention in Libya, this book examines the supportive relationship of press to power in building a conflict rationale during the vital period leading up to combat.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
The 2003 war against Iraq was not the first modern-day instance of a president taking the nation into foreign conflict assisted by a submissive Congress and national press corps that did not adequately challenge the case for intervention. All foreign U.S. military action since World War II has been undertaken without the constitutionally required declaration of war and with the support of a national press corps that has backed a chain of presidential policies justifying the battle. This symbiotic press-government relationship has helped presidential administrations set the national foreign policy and defense agenda throughout this post-World War II period. This book examines the supportive relationship of press to power in building a conflict rationale during the vital period leading up to combat. Sending troops to fight in foreign lands is the most difficult, and important, decision a president makes. Assisting this decision has been a press that, in failing to meet its watchdog responsibility during this key pre-war period, has instead helped construct and maintain a war agenda. A comprehensive overview of all conflicts from the Korean war to intervention in Libya is provided via a chapter by chapter analysis.

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