Catalogue


Hitler's Berlin : abused city /
Thomas Friedrich.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2012.
description
xiii, 482 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780300166705 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2012.
isbn
9780300166705 (cl : alk. paper)
language note
Translated from the German.
catalogue key
8403973
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [441]-455) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-01-01:
Once again, readers are reminded that "all politics is local." Friedrich's goal in this well-written volume is to explore the "local variant" of National Socialism found in Berlin. Rather than accept the standard, popular version that somehow National Socialism migrated up to Berlin from Munich with Hitler, or that it was imposed on an urbane and tolerant population, Friedrich asserts that deep native roots already existed. Throughout the 1920s, a combination of Goebbels's tight control over the Berlin SA units and funding from major radical businessmen brought a blossoming of the Nazi Party. The choreographed speeches, rallies, and violence bore fruit as the economy worsened, so that Hitler's Party emerged as the dominant voice for right-wing radicals by the time of the Great Depression. Friedrich stresses that Hitler's anti-Berlin and anti-urban sentiments of the early 1930s existed as part of his political rhetoric, calculated to strengthen small town and rural support. In fact, Friedrich argues, Hitler remained enamored of the older, imperial districts, stemming from his first visits in 1916 and 1917. The prose is clear and accessible. The subject matter will be of greatest interest to those with some background in Berlin's history or Hitler's rise to power. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. J. Kleiman University of Wisconsin Colleges
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fascinating study of the politics, culture and architecture of Berlin."- Washington Times
"A fascinating study of the politics, culture and architecture of Berlin."-- Washington Times
"Fascinating." World War II
This item was reviewed in:
Guardian UK, June 2012
Choice, January 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
From his first visit to Berlin in 1916, Hitler was preoccupied and fascinated by Germany's great capital city. In this vivid and entirely new account of Hitler's relationship with Berlin, Thomas Friedrich explores how Hitler identified with the city, how his political aspirations were reflected in architectural aspirations for the capital, and how Berlin surprisingly influenced the development of Hitler's political ideas. A leading expert on the twentieth-century history of Berlin, Friedrich employs new and little-known German sources to track Hitler's attitudes and plans for the city. Even while he despised both the cosmopolitan culture of the Weimar Republic and the profound Jewish influence on the city, Hitler was drawn to the grandiosity of its architecture and its imperial spirit. He dreamed of transforming Berlin into a capital that would reflect his autocracy, and he used the city for such varied purposes as testing his anti-Semitic policies and demonstrating the might of the Third Reich. Illuminating Berlin's burdened years under Nazi subjection, Friedrich offers new understandings of Hitler and his politics, architectural views, and artistic opinions.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From his first visit to Berlin in 1916, Hitler was preoccupied and fascinated by Germany's great capital city. In this account of Hitler's relationship with Berlin, Thomas Friedrich explores how Hitler identified with the city, how his political aspirations were reflected in architectural aspirations for the capital, and much more.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From his first visit to Berlin in 1916, Hitler was preoccupied and fascinated by Germany's great capital city. In this account of Hitler's relationships with Berlin, Thomas Friedrich explores how Hitler identified with the city, how his political aspirations were reflected in architectural aspirations for the capital, and much more.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Prefacep. x
'It's a wonderful city': 1916-18: HitlerÆs Early Visits to Berlinp. 1
'Not away from Berlin but towards BerlinÆ: 1919-25: A Social Climber from Munich on his Way Northp. 21
'It is the Gau's tragedy that it never had a real leader': 1922-6: Setbacks in Building Up the NSDA'P in Berlinp. 50
'A second headquarters': 1926: Goebbels Takes Over the Running of the Party in Berlinp. 78
'The alternative Berlin is lying in wait, ready to pounceÆ: 1927-8: The Successes of a Dangerously Misjudged Splinter Groupp. 107
'The movement is now gaining ground in worrying ways': 1928-30: The Breakthrough as the Dominant Party of the Rightp. 139
'Hitler is standing at the gates of Berlin': 1930: The NSDAP between Legitimate Tactics and Open Violencep. 178
'He hates Berlin and loves Munich': 1931: The Capital as the Butt of Ridicule and Vituperationp. 204
'The power struggle is just beginning': 1932: The Start of a Decisive Yearp. 242
'German Berlin is on the march': 1932-3: The Road to Powerp. 273
'A real and genuine capital': 1933: and Later: Hitler's Metropolisp. 316
Notesp. 373
Bibliographyp. 441
Indexp. 456
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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