Catalogue


Zhang Xueliang : the general who never fought /
Aron Shai ; [translated by Shoshana London Sappir].
imprint
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xiv, 164 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., facsims., maps, ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230279066 (hbk.), 9780230279063 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230279066 (hbk.)
9780230279063 (hbk.)
contents note
Opium and Government in Manchuria, 1901-1931 -- From One Incident to Another, From Manchuria to Xian, 1931-1936 -- "Forced Advice:" The Revolt against Chiang Kaishek, 1936 -- The Great Reconciliation, 1936-1937 -- The Wheel Turns 1936-1937 -- A General Drifting in the Wind, 1937-1946 -- Prisoner and Philosopher in Taiwan, 1946-1990 -- Twilight and Death in Hawaii, 1991-2001.
abstract
"The first book to tell the strange and fascinating story of General Zhang Xue-liang, the Chinese-Manchurian "Young Marshall"--a man who left an indelible mark on the history of modern China, but few know his story. Unlocking the mystery of this man's life, the author helps to shed light on 20th-century China."--
language note
Translated from the Hebrew.
catalogue key
8397369
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-161) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Aron Shai is the Rector (Provost) of Tel Aviv University, Israel, Professor of History and East Asian Studies and the Incumbent of the Shoul N. Eisenberg Chair for East Asian Affairs. His previous books in English include: Origins of the War in the East: Britain, China and Japan; Britain and China: Imperial Momentum; The Fate of British and French Firms in China: Imperialism Imprisoned; Sino-lsraeli Relations: Current Reality and Future Prospects; and a historical novel, Benhazar: Son to a Stranger.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-09-01:
Zhang Xue-liang, known as "the Young Marshal" for much of his life, was the son of the Manchurian warlord Marshal Zhang Zuolin. Zhang succeeded his father after the Japanese assassinated him in 1928. His main historical significance was his leading role in arresting his leader, Chiang Kai-Shek, in Xi'an in 1936 (what became known as "the Xi'an Incident") in order to force Chiang to concentrate on fighting the Japanese rather than attacking the Chinese communists. Following Chiang's release, Zhang returned with his leader and entered almost 60 years of house arrest, moving all over China and eventually to Taiwan, when the Guomindang fled there in 1949. Shai (Tel Aviv Univ., Israel) makes some reference to the influence of Madame Chiang on Zhang, particularly in his conversion to Christianity. In general, Shai does not probe his subject very deeply in his straightforward account of this minor historical figure, often relying on unconvincing references to traditional Chinese culture to explain Zhang's behavior. Summing Up: Optional. General collections. P. Lorge Vanderbilt University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title tells the strange and fascinating story of General Zhang Xueliang, the Chinese Manchurian 'Young Marshall' - a man who left an indelible mark on the history of modern China, but few know his story. Unlocking the mystery of the man's life, the author helps to shed light on 20th century China.
Main Description
The first book to tell the strange and fascinating story of General Zhang Xue-liang, the Chinese-Manchurian "Young Marshall" -- a man who left an indelible mark on the history of modern China, but few know his story. Unlocking the mystery of this man's life, the author helps to shed light on 20th-century China.
Main Description
The first book totell the strange and fascinating story ofGeneral Zhang Xue-liang, the Chinese-Manchurian "Young Marshall" - a man who left an indelible mark on the history of modern China, but few know his story.Unlocking the mystery of this man's life, the author helps to shed light on 20th-century China.
Main Description
Zhang Xueliang, the Chinese-Manchurian 'Young Marshal', was born in 1901. Aron Shai presents him as a man who overcame an addiction to opium; who sympathized with fascism, but tried to crush it when it reared its head in China under the Japanese (even though it meant collaborating with the Communists); and who admired and coveted many women, yet who would submit only to one - the beautiful and charismatic wife of his commander and rival. In short, this is the story of a man who was both strong and weak.
Table of Contents
Frontispiecep. iv
List of Plates and Mapsp. x
Acknowledgmentsp. xii
Notes on Sources, Index and Transliterationp. xiv
Introductionp. 1
Opium and Government in Manchuria, 1901-31p. 6
From One Incident to Another, from Manchuria to Xi'an, 1931-6p. 31
'Forced Advice': The Revolt Against Chiang Kai-shek, 1936p. 54
The Great Reconciliation, 1936-7p. 68
The Wheel Turns, 1936-7p. 96
A General as a Drifting Leaf, 1937-46p. 104
Prisoner and Philosopher in Taiwan, 1946-90p. 119
Twilight and Death in Hawaii, 1991-2001p. 146
Notesp. 154
Select Bibliographyp. 159
Indexp. 162
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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