Catalogue

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Epidemic encounters : influenza, society, and culture in Canada, 1918-20 /
edited by Magda Fahrni and Esyllt W. Jones.
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, c2012.
description
ix, 290 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780774822121 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, c2012.
isbn
9780774822121 :
catalogue key
8395158
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 272-278) and index.
Issued also in electronic formats.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Magda Fahrni is an associate professor in the Department of History at the Universit du Qubec Montral. Esyllt W. Jones is an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of Manitoba.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Epidemic Encounters is the first book to examine the 1918 flu epidemic as it was experienced in Canada. Displaying rigorous research with detailed descriptions, it is a welcome addition to Canadian medical historiography, as well as the international literature of this pandemic.-- J.T.H. Connor, John Clinch Professor of Medical Humanities and History of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Teachers/Educators
This book will be of value not only to historians and medicalanthropologists but also to clinicians and government officials chargedwith planning responses to pandemic diseases.
Long Description
Health crises such as the SARS epidemic and H1N1 have rekindledinterest among historians, medical authorities, and governmentofficials in the 1918 influenza pandemic, a crisis that swept the globein the wake of the First World War and killed approximately 50 millionpeople. Epidemic Encounters zeroes in on Canada, where one-third ofthe population took ill and fifty-five thousand people died, toconsider the various ways in which this country was affected by thepandemic. How did military and medical authorities, health careworkers, and ordinary citizens respond? What role did socialinequalities play in determining who survived? To answer thesequestions as they pertained to both local and national contexts, thecontributors explore a number of key themes and topics, including theexperiences of nurses and Aboriginal peoples, public letter writing inMontreal, the place of the epidemic within industrial modernity, andthe relationship between mourning and interwar spiritualism. In theprocess, they offer new insights into medical history'susefulness in the struggle against epidemic disease.
Main Description
Health crises such as the SARS epidemic and H1N1 have rekindled interest in the 1918 influenza pandemic, which swept the globe after the First World War and killed approximately 50 million people. Epidemic Encounters examines the pandemic in Canada, where one-third of the population took ill and fifty-five thousand people died. What role did social inequalities play in determining who survived? How did the authorities, health care workers, and ordinary citizens respond? Contributors answer these questions as they pertained to both local and national contexts. In the process, they offer new insights into medical history's usefulness in the struggle against epidemic disease.
Main Description
Health crises such as the SARS epidemic and H1N1 have rekindledinterest in the 1918 influenza pandemic, which swept the globe afterthe First World War and killed approximately 50 million people.Epidemic Encounters zeroes in on Canada, where one-third ofthe population took ill and fifty-five thousand people died, toconsider the various ways in which this country was affected by thepandemic. How did military and medical authorities, health careworkers, and ordinary citizens respond? What role did socialinequalities play in determining who survived? Contributors answerthese questions as they pertained to both local and national contexts.In the process, they offer new insights into medical history'susefulness in the struggle against epidemic disease.
Table of Contents
Figures and Tablesp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Public Responses to the Influenza Pandemic in Canada
The Limits of Necessity: Public Health, Dissent, and the War Effort during the 1918 Influenza Pandemicp. 21
"Rendering Valuable Service": The Politics of Nursing during the 1918-19 Influenza Crisisp. 48
"Respectfully Submitted": Citizens and Public Letter Writing during Montreal's Influenza Epidemic, 1918-20p. 70
Who Contracted Influenza and Why?
The North-South Divide: Social Inequality and Mortality from the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in Hamilton, Ontariop. 97
Beyond Biology: Understanding the Social Impact of Infectious Disease in Two Aboriginal-Communitiesp. 113
A Geographical Analysis of the Spread of Spanish Influenza in Quebec, 1918-20p. 142
Influenza and the Limits of Modernity
Flu Stories: Engaging with Disease, Death, and Modernity in British Columbia, 1918-19p. 167
Spectral Influenza: Winnipeg's Hamilton Family, Interwar Spiritualism, and Pandemic Diseasep. 193
Influenza and Public Health in the Contemporary Context
Toronto's Health Department in Action: Influenza in 1918 and SARS in 2003p. 225
Conclusionp. 266
Selected Bibliographyp. 272
Contributorsp. 279
Indexp. 282
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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