Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The life of Herbert Hoover : fighting Quaker, 1928-1933 /
Glen Jeansonne.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xxi, 539 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
023010309X (hbk.), 9780230103092 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
023010309X (hbk.)
9780230103092 (hbk.)
abstract
This is the first definitive study of the presidency of America's least understood, most neglected and most under-appreciated Chief Executive. Born in a Quaker hamlet in Iowa, orphaned at nine, Herbert Hoover rose to wealth and world fame as an international mining engineer, the savior of Belgium during the Great War, and Food Administrator under Woodrow Wilson. Perhaps the greatest Secretary of Commerce in American history, he helped engineer the prosperity of the 1920s and vainly warned of an economy overheated by speculation that collapsed in the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Combining government with private resources, he became the first president to pit government action against the economic cycle, setting precedents and spawning ideas employed by his successor and all future presidents. Modest, shy, humble, with a subtle sense of humor, he lacked the self-promotional style of professional politicians and eschewed political invective. His depression measures mitigated the effects of the depression yet failed to end it. In foreign policy he sponsored naval disarmament, refused to recognition territory seized by force, and made world peace his priority. Maligned as a miserly misanthrope, he was blamed for the crash and depression during the 1932 campaign, which he lost to Franklin D. Roosevelt by a slightly larger margin than he had defeated Al Smith in 1928. Jeansonne's study sweeps away the cobwebs of neglect from Hoover's presidency and his lively prose humanizes and evokes greater understanding of our thirty-first president. -- Publisher's description.
catalogue key
8394023
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 521-532) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-10-01:
Jeansonne (Univ. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) has contributed another fine volume to The Life of Herbert Hoover--a lengthy biography of the 31st president begun by George H. Nash's first three volumes covering the early years (CH, Sep'83; CH, Mar'89, 26-4063; CH, Jan'97, 34-2957) and continued with Kendrick Clements's fourth volume on the decade preceding Hoover's election to the presidency (CH, Apr'11, 48-4659). In this sympathetic 500-page portrayal, Jeansonne examines the presidential years, focusing on Hoover's administration's efforts to combat the Depression, his dealings with Congress on a variety of political issues, and his management of the country's foreign affairs. The author shows that Hoover was anything but his caricature of an uncaring "do-nothing" president, yet demonstrates the limit of the president's emphasis on voluntary cooperation in generating economic recovery. As included in the previous volumes of this series, Jeansonne dedicates a few chapters to Hoover's private life in an effort to humanize the president and to shed light on his subsequent actions as president. Extensive in its use of the Herbert Hoover Papers and other relevant primary and secondary sources (as the previous volumes also utilized), this installment is the most important to date. Summing Up: Essential. Most levels/libraries. K. J. Volanto Collin College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Essential." - CHOICE 'Glen Jeansonne's meticulous research and vigorous, passionate prose, creates an insightful evaluation of a misunderstood and sometimes forgotten president in The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928-1933. Jeansonne offers the reader a fresh look at Hoover's presidency, eloquently shedding light on how he met a demanding job during difficult times. Fighting Quaker is much more than an evaluation of a president; instead, it empathetically paints a picture of a humanitarian public servant met with an untimely economic disaster, rather than an impersonal, do-nothing president mishandling adversity. With warmth, candor, and an impressive depth of research, Jeansonne crafts a portrait of a great American.'-Express Milwaukee 'In masterful prose, Glen Jeansonne skillfully explains how a man once heralded as the 'Master of Emergencies' was later branded as 'President Reject.' It's a cautionary tale of the contradictions between public service and political leadership and Jeansonne tells it well. This book is destined to become the standard account of the Hoover presidency.'- Timothy Walch, Director Emeritus, Herbert Hoover Presidential Library 'In this nuanced and sensitive portrait of Herbert Hoover as President, Glen Jeansonne invites readers to take a fresh look at the thirty-first President. His Hoover is a warmly human leader who drew upon twenty years of national and international experience to formulate a rational but ultimately unsuccessful program to combat the Great Depression. This book offers readers a fresh, impartial account of the much-criticized presidency of Herbert Hoover.'-Kendrick A. Clements, professor of History, the University of South Carolina and author of The Life of Herbert Hoover: Imperfect Visionary, 1918-1928 'Glen Jeansonne demystifies and revitalizes the distorted image of Herbert Hoover, commonly perceived as a failed president, rejected by public opinion, historians, and posterity. Meticulously researched and written in an eloquent style, Jeansonne explores every facet of Hoover's presidency, going beyond any previous study in detail, thoroughness, and insight. He portrays a warm, sensitive, humane, principled, yet flexible, embattled Quaker coping with a tough job during tough times. The reader learns that while the Great Depression was the focus of president's time and energy there was much more to his administration, including his family, his social life, his love of children, good conversation, reading, and fishing, his inveterate kindness, and his gentle wit. The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928-1933 opens new vistas into the life and presidency of Herbert Hoover and doubtless will alter the image of the much maligned national leader whom Raymond Moley characterized as the greatest Republican of his generation.'-Hal Elliott Wert, Kansas City Art Institute, and author of Hoover the Fishing President: Portrait of a Private Man and His Life Outdoors 'Glen Jeansonne has produced an impressive and provocative appraisal of Herbert Hoover's embattled presidency-and a fresh, empathetic account of a remarkable American life. Writing with vigor and flair, Jeansonne presents us a Hoover almost nobody knows but whom everyone ought to know, if we are to understand our nation's past without prejudice.'-George H. Nash, author of the first three volumes of The Life of Herbert Hoover
"Glen Jeansonne has produced a balanced and meticulously researched account of the presidency of Herbert Hoover. Jeansonne masterfully paints Hoover as a man of principle who compromised as best he could [. . .] but he remained faithful to his voluntarist vision. Jeansonne weaves a rich and complex narrative that for the first time allows readers to see Hoover in the Great Depression as an active, innovative leader asking critical questions about the economic and moral code of government." - The Journal of American History "Essential." - CHOICE "Glen Jeansonne''s meticulous research and vigorous, passionate prose, creates an insightful evaluation of a misunderstood and sometimes forgotten president in The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928-1933 . Jeansonne offers the reader a fresh look at Hoover''s presidency, eloquently shedding light on how he met a demanding job during difficult times. Fighting Quaker is much more than an evaluation of a president; instead, it empathetically paints a picture of a humanitarian public servant met with an untimely economic disaster, rather than an impersonal, do-nothing president mishandling adversity. With warmth, candor, and an impressive depth of research, Jeansonne crafts a portrait of a great American." - Express Milwaukee "The fact is, most ''conventional wisdom'' about Hoover, both taught in college classrooms and coming through ''historians,'' is flat-out wrong. Such is the inescapable conclusion one must draw after reading Wisconsin academician Glen Jeansonne''s richly detailed account of the Hoover presidency, 1929-1933" - Washington Times "In masterful prose, Glen Jeansonne skillfully explains how a man once heralded as the ''Master of Emergencies'' was later branded as ''President Reject.'' It''s a cautionary tale of the contradictions between public service and political leadership and Jeansonne tells it well. This book is destined to become the standard account of the Hoover presidency." - Timothy Walch, Director Emeritus, Herbert Hoover Presidential Library "In this nuanced and sensitive portrait of Herbert Hoover as President, Glen Jeansonne invites readers to take a fresh look at the thirty-first President. His Hoover is a warmly human leader who drew upon twenty years of national and international experience to formulate a rational but ultimately unsuccessful program to combat the Great Depression. This book offers readers a fresh, impartial account of the much-criticized presidency of Herbert Hoover." - Kendrick A. Clements, professor of History, the University of South Carolina and author of The Life of Herbert Hoover: Imperfect Visionary, 1918-1928 "Glen Jeansonne demystifies and revitalizes the distorted image of Herbert Hoover, commonly perceived as a failed president, rejected by public opinion, historians, and posterity. Meticulously researched and written in an eloquent style, Jeansonne explores every facet of Hoover''s presidency, going beyond any previous study in detail, thoroughness, and insight. He portrays a warm, sensitive, humane, principled, yet flexible, embattled Quaker coping with a tough job during tough times. The reader learns that while the Great Depression was the focus of president''s time and energy there was much more to his administration, including his family, his social life, his love of children, good conversation, reading, and fishing, his inveterate kindness, and his gentle wit. The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928-1933 opens new vistas into the life and presidency of Herbert Hoover and doubtless will alter the image of the much maligned national leader whom Raymond Moley characterized as the greatest Republican of his generation." - Hal Elliott Wert, Kansas City Art Institute, and author of Hoover the Fishing President: Portrait of a Private Man and His Life Outdoors "Glen Jeansonne has produced an impressive and provocative appraisal of Herbert Hoover''s embattled presidency - and a fresh, empathetic account of a remarkable American life. Writing with vigor and flair, Jeansonne presents us a Hoover almost nobody knows but whom everyone ought to know, if we are to understand our nation''s past without prejudice." - George H. Nash, author of the first three volumes of The Life of Herbert Hoover
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The first definitive study of the America's least understood president provokes greater understanding of the thirty-first president
Main Description
Provocative, brilliantly written, and exhaustively researched, this book is the first definitive study of the presidency of one of America's most maligned and poorly understood Chief Executives. Born in a Quaker hamlet in Iowa and orphaned at nine, Herbert Hoover had already risen to wealth and global fame as an international mining engineer, the savior of Belgium during the Great War, Woodrow Wilson's Food Administrator, and perhaps the greatest Secretary of Commerce in American history by the time he assumed the presidency. Modest, shy, humble, with a subtle sense of humor, he lacked the self-promotional style of professional politicians and eschewed political invective. While in the cabinet he had helped to engineer the prosperity of the 1920s and vainly warned of an economy overheated by speculation, but the ensuing Wall Street Crash of 1929 would come to overwhelmingly define his legacy. Combining public and private resources, he made history as the first president to pit government action against the economic cycle, creating a precedent that would be employed by his successor and all other future presidents. His economic measures mitigated the effects of the Great Depression, yet they failed to end it. In foreign policy he sponsored naval disarmament and made world peace his priority. Unfairly painted as a miserly misanthrope and the architect of the stock market crash, he lost the 1932 campaign to Franklin D. Roosevelt by a slightly larger margin than he had defeated Al Smith in 1928. Glen Jeansonne's study sweeps away the cobwebs of neglect from Hoover's presidency. His lively prose humanizes Hoover for us and allows a greater understanding of our thirty-first president, one that is more valuable now than ever before.
Main Description
Provocative, brilliantly written, and exhaustively researched, this book is the first definitive study of the presidency of one of America's most maligned and poorly understood Chief Executives. Born in a Quaker hamlet in Iowa and orphaned at nine, Herbert Hoover had already risen to wealth and global fame as an international mining engineer, the savior of Belgium during the Great War, Woodrow Wilson's Food Administrator, and perhaps the greatest Secretary of Commerce in American history bythe time he assumed the presidency. Modest, shy, humble, with a subtle sense of humor, he lacked the self-promotional style of professional politicians and eschewed political invective. While in the cabinet he had helped to engineer the prosperity of the 1920s and vainly warned of an economy overheated by speculation, but the ensuing Wall Street Crash of 1929 would come to overwhelmingly define his legacy. Combining public and private resources, he made history as the first president to pit government action against the economic cycle, creating a precedent that would be employed by his successor and all other future presidents. His economic measures mitigated the effects of the Great Depression, yet they failed to end it. In foreign policy he sponsored naval disarmament and made world peace his priority. Unfairly painted as a miserly misanthrope and the architect of the stock market crash, he lost the 1932 campaign to Franklin D. Roosevelt by a slightly larger margin than he had defeated Al Smith in 1928. Glen Jeansonne's study sweeps away the cobwebs of neglect from Hoover's presidency. His lively prose humanizes Hoover for us and allows a greater understanding of our thirty-first president, one that is more valuable now than ever before.
Main Description
This is the first definitive study of the presidency of America's least understood, most neglected and most under-appreciated Chief Executive. Born in a Quaker hamlet in Iowa, orphaned at nine, Herbert Hoover rose to wealth and world fame as an international mining engineer, the savior of Belgium during the Great War, and Food Administrator under Woodrow Wilson. Perhaps the greatest Secretary of Commerce in American history, he helped engineer the prosperity of the 1920s and vainly warned of an economy overheated by speculation that collapsed in the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Combining government with private resources, he became the first president to pit government action against the economic cycle, setting precedents and spawning ideas employed by his successor and all future presidents. Modest, shy, humble, with a subtle sense of humor, he lacked the self-promotional style of professional politicians and eschewed political invective. His depression measures mitigated the effects of the depression yet failed to end it. In foreign policy he sponsored naval disarmament, refused to recognition territory seized by force, and made world peace his priority. Maligned as a miserly misanthrope, he was blamed for the crash and depression during the 1932 campaign, which he lost to Franklin D. Roosevelt by a slightly larger margin than he had defeated Al Smith in 1928. Jeansonne's study sweeps away the cobwebs of neglect from Hoover's presidency and his lively prose humanizes and evokes greater understanding of our thirty-first president.
Main Description
This is the first definitive study of the presidency of America's least understood, most neglected and most under-appreciated Chief Executive. Born in a Quaker hamlet in Iowa, orphaned at nine, Herbert Hoover rose to wealth and world fame as an international mining engineer, the savior of Belgium during the Great War, and Food Administrator under Woodrow Wilson. Perhaps the greatest Secretary of Commerce in American history, he helped engineer the prosperity of the 1920s and vainly warned ofan economy overheated by speculation that collapsed in the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Combining government with private resources, he became the first president to pit government action against the economic cycle, setting precedents and spawning ideas employed by his successor and all future presidents. Modest, shy, humble, with a subtle sense of humor, he lacked the self-promotional style of professional politicians and eschewed political invective. His depression measures mitigated the effectsof the depression yet failed to end it. In foreign policy he sponsored naval disarmament, refused to recognition territory seized by force, and made world peace his priority. Maligned as a miserly misanthrope, he was blamed for the crash and depression during the 1932 campaign, which he lost to Franklin D. Roosevelt by a slightly larger margin than he had defeated Al Smith in 1928. Jeansonne's study sweeps away the cobwebs of neglect from Hoover's presidency and his lively prose humanizes and evokes greater understanding of our thirty-first president.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Prefacep. xv
Prologue: The Long Dusty Road from West Branchp. 1
Landslidep. 15
Prepping for the Presidency and Sparring with Congressp. 43
Humanizing Hooverp. 65
A Whirling Dervishp. 89
The Engine of Prosperity Jumps the Trackp. 113
The Seventy-First Congress: Fighting the Political Warsp. 129
Hoover and the World: Foreign Policy, 1929-1930p. 155
A Polarized Partyp. 177
Combating the Depression: Phase I, 1929-1930p. 195
The Seventy-Second Congress: Frustrating Yet Fruitfulp. 217
Combating the Depression: Phase II, 1931-1932p. 253
Frustrated Farmers, Angry Veteransp. 279
Race, Gender, and Laborp. 303
The Grim Reaper Stalks the World: Foreign Affairs, 1931-1933p. 329
Life in the White House: Personal and Socialp. 347
The Peter Pan in Hoover: Children and Fishp. 3 61
The Fourth Estatep. 383
Running for His Life: The Election of 1932p. 403
The Hard Interregnump. 427
Fighting Quakerp. 451
Notesp. 469
A Note on the Sourcesp. 519
Bibliographyp. 521
Indexp. 533
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem