Catalogue


The modern neighbors of Tutankhamun [electronic resource] : history, life, and work in the villages of the Theban West Bank /
Kees van der Spek.
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, 2011.
description
xxxi, 500 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9774164032, 9789774164033
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, 2011.
isbn
9774164032
9789774164033
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Ancient remains as life's stage : differing perspectives on life in the Theban Necropolis -- The natural and social setting of the Theban West Bank communities -- Early European travelers and the emergence of the Theban communities in the consciousness of the West -- "In justice to the inhabitants of Gournei" : European presence and its literary record -- Protected space as domestic place : human presence and the emergence of the built environment in the Theban Necropolis -- Qurnawi foothills architecture : footprint, form, and function -- Agriculture, conflict, and the maintenance of stable social relations -- All in a season's work : Egyptology-induced labor relations at al-Hurubat -- Faked antikas and 'modern antiques' : artistic expression in the villages of the Theban West Bank -- Contemporary spirituality and traditional beliefs in the Theban Necropolis -- The ethnography of eviction -- Appendix 1. Ethnography in sensitive surroundings : notes on life and work among the tombs -- Appendix 2. Theban Mapping Project aerial photographs -- Appendix 3. English translation of Carla Burri's Italian The anonymous Venetian text -- Appendix 4. Extract from Howard Carter's autobiographical Sketch V -- Appendix 5. A petition from the people of Qurna to the Egyptian government -- Appendix 6. Art and craft production at al-Qurna.
abstract
"A historical-anthropological study of the people who lived in the antiquities precinct of Luxor's West Bank. Until their recent demolition, the colorful mud-brick hamlets of al-Qurna village, situated among the Noble Tombs of the Theban Necropolis on the Luxor West Bank, were home to a vibrant community. Inhabiting a place of intensive Egyptological research for over two centuries, it was inevitable that Qurnawis should become part of the history of Egyptology and the development of archaeological practice in the Theban Necropolis. But they have mostly been regarded as laborers for the excavation teams or dealers in the illicit antiquities trade. The modern people inhabiting the ancient burial grounds have themselves rarely been considered. By demonstrating the multiplicity of economic activities that are carried out in al-Qurna, this study counters the villagers' stereotypical representation as tomb robbers, and restores an understanding of who they are as people living their lives in the shadow of valued cultural heritage."--Publisher's description.
catalogue key
8392370
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 443-465) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
A historical-anthropological study of the people who lived in the antiquities precinct of Luxor's West Bank. Until their recent demolition, the colorful mud-brick hamlets of al-Qurna village, situated among the Noble Tombs of the Theban Necropolis on the Luxor West Bank, were home to a vibrant community. Inhabiting a place of intensive Egyptological research for over two centuries, it was inevitable that Qurnawis should become part of the history of Egyptology and the development of archaeological practice in the Theban Necropolis. But they have mostly been regarded as laborers for the excavation teams or dealers in the illicit antiquities trade. The modern people inhabiting the ancient burial grounds have themselves rarely been considered. By demonstrating the multiplicity of economic activities that are carried out in al-Qurna, this study counters the villagers' stereotypical representation as tomb robbers, and restores an understanding of who they are as people living their lives in the shadow of valued cultural heritage.
Main Description
A historical-anthropological study of the people who lived in the antiquities precinct of Luxor's West Bank.Until their recent demolition, the colorful mud-brick hamlets of al-Qurna village, situated among the Noble Tombs of the Theban Necropolis on the Luxor West Bank, were home to a vibrant community. Inhabiting a place of intensive Egyptological research for over two centuries, it was inevitable that Qurnawis should become part of the history of Egyptology and the development of archaeological practice in the Theban Necropolis. But they have mostly been regarded as laborers for the excavationteams or dealers in the illicit antiquities trade. The modern people inhabiting the ancient burial grounds have themselves rarely been considered.By demonstrating the multiplicity of economic activities that are carried out in al-Qurna, this study counters the villagers' stereotypical representation as tomb robbers, and restores an understanding of who they are as people living their lives in the shadow of valued cultural heritage.
Main Description
Until their recent demolition, the colorful mud-brick hamlets of al-Qurna village, situated among the Noble Tombs of the Theban Necropolis on the Luxor West Bank, were home to a vibrant community. While many might view this area only as an archaeological landscape, the presence of Qurnawi villagers equally defined the surrounding landscape in social terms. Inhabiting a place of intensive Egyptological research for over two centuries, it was inevitable that Qurnawis should become part of the history of Egyptology and the development of archaeological practice in the Theban Necropolis. But they have mostly been regarded as laborers for the excavation teams or dealers in the illicit antiquities trade. The modern people inhabiting the ancient burial grounds have themselves rarely been considered. By demonstrating the multiplicity of economic activities that are carried out in al-Qurna, this study counters the villagers' stereotypical representation as tomb robbers, and restores an understanding of who they are as people living their lives in the shadow of valued cultural heritage.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
List of Tablesp. xv
Foreword Kent R. Weeksp. xvii
Acknowledgments and an Invitationp. xxi
Notes on Transliterationp. xxxi
Prologue: A Theban Sound-scapep. 1
Introduction: Fieldwork in the Territory of Othersp. 5
Ancient Remains as Life's Stage: Differing Perspectives on Life in the Theban Necropolisp. 17
The Natural and Social Setting of the Theban West Bank Communitiesp. 39
Early European Travelers and the Emergence of the Theban Communities inConsciousness of the Westp. 53
"Injustice to the Inhabitants of Gournei": European Presence and Its Literary Recordp. 79
Protected Space as Domestic Place: Human Presence and the Emergence of the Built Environment in the Theban Necropolisp. 135
Qurnawi Foothills Architecture: Footprint, Form, and Functionp. 157
Agriculture, Conflict, and the Maintenance of Stable Social Relationsp. 172
All in a Season's Work: Egyptology-Induced Labor Relations at al-Hurubatp. 216
Faked Antikas and 'Modern Antiques': Artistic Expression in the Villages of the Theban West Bantp. 247
Contemporary Spirituality and Traditional Beliefs in the Theban Necropolisp. 289
The Ethnography of Evictionp. 319
p. 347
Ethnography in Sensitive Surroundings: Notes on Life and Work among the Tombsp. 355
Theban Mapping Project Aerial Photographsp. 369
English Translation of Carla Burri's Italian The Anonymous Venetian Textp. 381
Extract from Howard Carter's Autobiographical Sketch Vp. 383
A Petition from the People of Qurna to the Egyptian Governmentp. 387
Art and Craft Production at al-Qurnap. 389
Notesp. 399
Bibliographyp. 443
Indexp. 467
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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