Catalogue


A history of the Catholic Church in the American South [electronic resource] : 1513-1900 /
James M. Woods.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
description
xv, 498 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0813035325 (alk. paper), 9780813035321 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
isbn
0813035325 (alk. paper)
9780813035321 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Cross and sword: the Spanish Catholic Mission to La Florida, 1513-1763 -- Padres, prairies, and Piney Woods: Catholicism in Spanish Texas, 1519-1763 -- Fleur-de-Lis: Catholicism in French lower Louisiana and the Gulf Coast, 1673-1763 -- To the manor born: Catholics in the Southern English colonies, 1633-1763 -- The Carroll era: Southern Catholics and the new American republic, 1763-1815 -- Church and state: the erosion of European empires in the south, 1763-1821 -- Annexation and accommodation: Catholic growth within the expanding south, 1815-1845 -- From aliens to Confederates: Catholics in the south, 1845-1865 -- A regional religion: Catholic prelates in the Postbellum South, 1865-1900 -- Migrations, movements, and ministry: Catholicism in the South, 1845-1900.
catalogue key
8391957
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 379-479) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James M. Woods, professor of history at Georgia Southern University, is author of Mission and Memory: A History of the Catholic Church in Arkansas and Rebellion and Realignment: Arkansas' Road to Secession.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
In the popular mind, the early origins of the American founding often begin with Protestant Jamestown or Puritan New England. For too long, scholarship on the early origins of American Catholicism has lagged; even more so has understanding of its southern roots. Although admittedly not an original work, Woods's study skillfully merges the historiography of American Catholicism and southern history into one coherent picture from the early colonial period to the late 19th century. Woods (Georgia Southern Univ.) argues convincingly that Catholicism shaped the early American founding in ways scholars have typically ignored, and that its particularly southern roots--especially through the influence of the French and Spanish empires, and later Irish and German immigrants--are much richer than scholars recognize. Although the rural South struggled in recruiting immigrants, and despite the near Protestant hegemony in the religious landscape, noted leaders such as Charles and John Carroll, Martin John Spalding, James McCloskey, and John England managed to fashion Catholic identity in the US through the founding of cathedrals and universities. Although Protestantism shaped the general culture and religious convictions of most Americans, Woods re-centers the earlier roots of southern Catholicism and lays the groundwork for a comprehensive study of the 20th century. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. M. S. Hill Gordon College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
“In a masterful survey of research on Catholicism in the South, Woods has done for that region what James Hennesey did for the Catholic Church in the United States in American Catholics.”-Gerald P. Fogarty, University of Virginia “This is a book we have long needed. Over the last four decades the history of the evangelical tradition in the South has been discovered and much written about, but the Catholic dimension of southern religious history has lagged behind in the historiography. Finally here is a synthesis of almost three centuries of the Catholic Church in the region.”-John B. Boles, Rice University No Christian denomination has had a longer or more varied existence in the American South than the Catholic Church. The Spanish missions established in Florida and Texas promoted Catholicism. Catholicism was the dominant religion among the French who settled in Louisiana. Prior to the influx of Irish immigrants in the 1840s, most American Catholics lived south of the Mason-Dixon line. Anti-Catholic prejudice was never as strong in the South as in the North or Midwest and was rare in the region before the twentieth century. James Woods’s sweeping history stretches from the first European settlement of the continent through the end of the Spanish-American War. The book is divided into three distinct sections: the colonial era, the early Republic through the annexation of Texas in 1845, and the stormy latter half of the nineteenth century. Woods pays particular attention to church/state relations, mission work and religious orders, the church and slavery, immigration to the South, and the experience of Catholicism in a largely Protestant region. He also highlights the contributions and careers of certain important southern Catholics, both clerical and lay, and considers how the diverse Catholic ethnic and racial groups have expressed their faith-and their citizenship-through the centuries.
Main Description
No Christian denomination has had a longer or more varied existence in the American South than the Catholic Church. The Spanish missions established in Florida and Texas promoted Catholicism, which was also the dominant religion among French settlers in Louisiana. Until the mid-nineteenth century, most American Catholics lived south of the Mason-Dixon Line. Anti-Catholic prejudice was never as strong in the South as in the North or Midwest and was rare in the region before the twentieth century.
Description for Bookstore
"In a masterful survey of research on Catholicism in the South, Woods has done for that region what James Hennesey did for the Catholic Church in the United States in American Catholics."-Gerald P. Fogarty, University of Virginia "This is a book we have long needed. Over the last four decades the history of the evangelical tradition in the South has been discovered and much written about, but the Catholic dimension of southern religious history has lagged behind in the historiography. Finally here is a synthesis of almost three centuries of the Catholic Church in the region."-John B. Boles, Rice University No Christian denomination has had a longer or more varied existence in the American South than the Catholic Church. The Spanish missions established in Florida and Texas promoted Catholicism. Catholicism was the dominant religion among the French who settled in Louisiana. Prior to the influx of Irish immigrants in the 1840s, most American Catholics lived south of the Mason-Dixon line. Anti-Catholic prejudice was never as strong in the South as in the North or Midwest and was rare in the region before the twentieth century. James Woods's sweeping history stretches from the first European settlement of the continent through the end of the Spanish-American War. The book is divided into three distinct sections: the colonial era, the early Republic through the annexation of Texas in 1845, and the stormy latter half of the nineteenth century. Woods pays particular attention to church/state relations, mission work and religious orders, the church and slavery, immigration to the South, and the experience of Catholicism in a largely Protestant region. He also highlights the contributions and careers of certain important southern Catholics, both clerical and lay, and considers how the diverse Catholic ethnic and racial groups have expressed their faith-and their citizenship-through the centuries.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From the first European settlement through to the Spanish-American War, this study pays particular attention to church-state relations, mission work & religious orders, the church & slavery, & the experience of being Catholic in a largely Protestant region.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
The Colonial Context, 1513-1763
Cross and Sword: The Spanish Catholic Mission to La Florida, 1513-1763p. 1
Padres, Prairies, and Piney Woods: Catholicism in Spanish Texas, 1519-1763p. 32
Fleur-de-Lis: Catholicism in French Lower Louisiana and the Gulf Coast, 1673-1763p. 72
To the Manor Born: Catholics in the Southern English Colonies, 1633-1763p. 106
American Republicanism and European Decline, 1763-1845
The Carroll Era: Southern Catholics and the New American Republic, 1763-1815p. 141
Church and State: The Erosion of European Empires in the South, 1763-1821p. 175
Annexation and Accommodation: Catholic Growth within the Expanding South, 1815-1845p. 215
Resistance, Rebellion, Reconstruction, and Regionalism, 1845-1900
From Aliens to Confederates: Catholics in the South, 1845-1865p. 255
A Regional Religion: Catholic Prelates in the Postbellum South, 1865-1900p. 296
Migrations, Movements, and Ministry: Catholicism in the South, 1845-1900p. 334
Conclusionp. 376
Notesp. 379
Bibliographyp. 447
Indexp. 481
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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