Catalogue


Examining mathematics practice through : classroom artifacts /
Lynn T. Goldsmith, Nanette Seago.
imprint
Boston : Pearson, c2013.
description
xxiii, 165 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0132101289, 9780132101288
format(s)
Book
Holdings
  • In
    Curriculum Resources
    510.71 G624E
    Browse Shelf Note ▼
    3RD FLOOR; borrowing restricted to OISE students, faculty and staff
More Details
added author
imprint
Boston : Pearson, c2013.
isbn
0132101289
9780132101288
catalogue key
8388392
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lynn Goldsmith began her career as a developmental psychologist, where her major research interests lay in understanding the formal and informal systems that support the development of extreme talent. For the past 20 years, she has worked in the field of mathematics education, investigating factors contributing to successful professional development, the role of curriculum in educational reform, and the emotional aspects of learning. She has co-authored Choosing a Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum (Heinemann, 2000), served as series co-editor of the Guiding Middle-Grades Curriculum Decisions series (Heinemann, 2000), and co-authored Nature's Gambit: Child Prodigies and the Development of Human Potential (Teachers College Press, 1991). Nanette Seago was the primary author of Learning and Teaching Linear Functions: Video Cases for Mathematics Professional Development, 6-12. She has been working in mathematics professional development for twenty years. Currently, she is working at WestEd as a Principal Investigator for a National Science Foundation project focused on the research and design of video case materials for middle school teachers-Learning and Teaching Geometry.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The book takes a qualitative view of a quantitative subject, which is not easy to do successfully. The discussion on the strengths of using habits of mind as a basis for lesson plan evaluation was very strong. I would use that idea as the basis for PD in my own school district." - Julie A. Drewry, K-12 Mathematics Supervisor, Roanoke City Public Schools, Roanoke, VA "[This book] examined and delineated the thinking that needs to occur to develop mathematically strong instruction and to improve our analysis of students' thinking. It shifted our attention from errors as merely mistakes, to errors that help us to identify strengths as well as weaknesses. How to interpret student thinking based on artifacts from the classroom, how to identify the mathematical "big ideas" in curriculum, how to ensure the rigor of our lessons, and how students represent their mathematical thinking as well as using errors to develop next steps are the key ideas of this manuscript. All of these topics are critical components of quality instruction." - Jane Elizabeth Gillis, Math Cadre, Red Clay Consolidated School District, Wilmington, DE
"The book takes a qualitative view of a quantitative subject, which is not easy to do successfully. The discussion on the strengths of using habits of mind as a basis for lesson plan evaluation was very strong. I would use that idea as the basis for PD in my own school district." - Julie A. Drewry, K-12 Mathematics Supervisor, Roanoke City Public Schools, Roanoke, VA "I thought the book addressed a need. So much of our PD is geared toward our new, inexperienced teachers that our veterans are often left to fend for themselves. This book is really geared for the more experienced teacher. It examined and delineated the thinking that needs to occur to develop mathematically strong instruction and to improve our analysis of students' thinking. It shifted our attention from errors as merely mistakes, to errors that help us to identify strengths as well as weaknesses. How to interpret student thinking based on artifacts from the classroom, how to identify the mathematical "big ideas" in curriculum, how to ensure the rigor of our lessons, and how students represent their mathematical thinking as well as using errors to develop next steps are the key ideas of this manuscript. All of these topics are critical components of quality instruction." - Jane Elizabeth Gillis, Math Cadre, Red Clay Consolidated School District, Wilmington, DE
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts helps teachers become more analytic about their students' thinking by showing them how to use student artifacts to evaluate what is happening in the classroom. Offering an innovative framework, this book helps teachers learn how to use classroom artifacts to assess students' mathematical thinking and students' understanding of mathematical content . Focusing on elementary through middle grades, chapters investigate what classroom artifacts are, how to interpret them and ways to use these data to improve mathematics instruction. A complimentary access code for the online PDToolkit (http://pdtoolkit.pearson.com) inside every new book gives mathematics leaders access to: Video Clips Downloadable Worksheets
Long Description
Offering an innovative framework, this book helps teachers learn how to use classroom artifacts to assess students' mathematical thinking and students' understanding of mathematical content. Teachers need to be able to diagnose what their students do and don't understand about mathematics. Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts helps teachers become more analytic about their students' thinking by showing them how to use student artifacts to evaluate what is happening in the classroom. Focusing on elementary through middle grades, chapters investigate what classroom artifacts are, how to interpret them and ways to use this data to improve mathematics instruction.
Main Description
Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts helps teachers become more analytic about their students'thinking by showing them how to use student artifacts to evaluate what is happening in the classroom. Offering an innovative framework, this book helps teachers learn how to use classroom artifacts to assess students'mathematical thinking and students' understanding of mathematical content . Focusing on elementary through middle grades, chapters investigate what classroom artifacts are, how to interpret them and ways to use these data to improve mathematics instruction. A complimentary access code for the online PDToolkit (http://pdtoolkit.pearson.com) inside every new book gives mathematics leaders access to: Video Clips Downloadable Worksheets
Main Description
Offering an innovative framework, this book helps teachers learn how to use classroom artifacts to assess students'mathematical thinking and students' understanding of mathematical content. Teachers need to be able to diagnose what their students do and don't understand about mathematics. Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts helps teachers become more analytic about their students'thinking by showing them how to use student artifacts to evaluate what is happening in the classroom. Focusing on elementary through middle grades, chapters investigate what classroom artifacts are, how to interpret them and ways to use this data to improve mathematics instruction.
Back Cover Copy
Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts
Back Cover Copy
Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts Lynn Goldsmith and Nanette Seago Offering an innovative framework, this book helps teachers learn how to use classroom artifacts to assess students'' mathematical thinking and students'' understanding of mathematical content. Teachers need to be able to diagnose what their students do and don''t understand about mathematics. Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts helps teachers become more analytic about their students'' thinking by showing them how to use student artifacts to evaluate what is happening in the classroom. Focusing on elementary through middle grades, chapters investigate what classroom artifacts are, how to interpret them and ways to use this data to improve mathematics instruction. "The book takes a qualitative view of a quantitative subject, which is not easy to do successfully. The discussion on the strengths of using habits of mind as a basis for lesson plan evaluation was very strong. I would use that idea as the basis for PD in my own school district." - Julie A. Drewry, K-12 Mathematics Supervisor, Roanoke City Public Schools, Roanoke, VA "[This book] examined and delineated the thinking that needs to occur to develop mathematically strong instruction and to improve our analysis of students'' thinking. It shifted our attention from errors as merely mistakes, to errors that help us to identify strengths as well as weaknesses. How to interpret student thinking based on artifacts from the classroom, how to identify the mathematical "big ideas" in curriculum, how to ensure the rigor of our lessons, and how students represent their mathematical thinking as well as using errors to develop next steps are the key ideas of this manuscript. All of these topics are critical components of quality instruction." - Jane Elizabeth Gillis, Math Cadre, Red Clay Consolidated School District, Wilmington, DE Lynn Goldsmith began her career as a developmental psychologist, where her major research interests lay in understanding the formal and informal systems that support the development of extreme talent. for the past 20 years, she has worked in the field of mathematics education, investigating factors contributing to successful professional development, the role of curriculum in educational reform, and the emotional aspects of learning. She has co-authored Choosing a Standards-based Mathematics Curriculum (Heinemann, 2000), served as series co-editor of the Guiding Middle-grades Curriculum Decisions series (Heinemann, 2000), and co-authored Nature''s Gambit: Child Prodigies and the Development of Human Potential (Teachers College Press, 1991). Nanette Seago was the primary author of Learning and Teaching Linear Functions: Videocases for Mathematics Professional Development. She has been working in mathematics professional development for twenty years. Currently, she is working at WestEd as a Principal Investigator for a National Science Foundation project focused on the research and design of videocase materials for middle school teachersLearning and Teaching Geometry.
Back Cover Copy
Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts Lynn Goldsmith and Nanette Seago Offering an innovative framework, this book helps teachers learn how to use classroom artifacts to assess students'mathematical thinking and students' understanding of mathematical content. Teachers need to be able to diagnose what their students do and don't understand about mathematics. Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts helps teachers become more analytic about their students'thinking by showing them how to use student artifacts to evaluate what is happening in the classroom. Focusing on elementary through middle grades, chapters investigate what classroom artifacts are, how to interpret them and ways to use this data to improve mathematics instruction. "The book takes a qualitative view of a quantitative subject, which is not easy to do successfully. The discussion on the strengths of using habits of mind as a basis for lesson plan evaluation was very strong. I would use that idea as the basis for PD in my own school district." - Julie A. Drewry, K-12 Mathematics Supervisor, Roanoke City Public Schools, Roanoke, VA "[This book] examined and delineated the thinking that needs to occur to develop mathematically strong instruction and to improve our analysis of students' thinking. It shifted our attention from errors as merely mistakes, to errors that help us to identify strengths as well as weaknesses. How to interpret student thinking based on artifacts from the classroom, how to identify the mathematical "big ideas" in curriculum, how to ensure the rigor of our lessons, and how students represent their mathematical thinking as well as using errors to develop next steps are the key ideas of this manuscript. All of these topics are critical components of quality instruction." - Jane Elizabeth Gillis, Math Cadre, Red Clay Consolidated School District, Wilmington, DE Lynn Goldsmith began her career as a developmental psychologist, where her major research interests lay in understanding the formal and informal systems that support the development of extreme talent. For the past 20 years, she has worked in the field of mathematics education, investigating factors contributing to successful professional development, the role of curriculum in educational reform, and the emotional aspects of learning. She has co-authored Choosing a Standards-based Mathematics Curriculum (Heinemann, 2000), served as series co-editor of the Guiding Middle-grades Curriculum Decisions series (Heinemann, 2000), and co-authored Nature's Gambit: Child Prodigies and the Development of Human Potential (Teachers College Press, 1991). Nanette Seago was the primary author of Learning and Teaching Linear Functions: Videocases for Mathematics Professional Development. She has been working in mathematics professional development for twenty years. Currently, she is working at WestEd as a Principal Investigator for a National Science Foundation project focused on the research and design of videocase materials for middle school teachersLearning and Teaching Geometry.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xiii
Prefacep. xvii
Acknowledgmentsp. xxii
Turning to the Evidencep. 1
What Are Artifacts, and Why Analyze Them?p. 3
Learning to See through Multiple Lensesp. 4
Our Vision of Mathematics Learning and Teachingp. 6
A Framework for Using Artifacts Skillfullyp. 10
Attention to Thinkingp. 13
Describing and Interpreting Classroom Artifactsp. 14
Why Focus on Evidence?p. 16
Creating a Description of Student Workp. 16
Exercise 1: Dannyp. 19
Process for Analyzing Danny's Workp. 20
Commentary on Danny's Workp. 21
Exercise 2: Melissap. 23
Process for Viewing and Analyzing the Melissa Videop. 24
Commentary on Melissa's Interviewp. 27
Reflecting on Exercise 2p. 30
Using Artifacts in Your Own Classroomp. 30
Warm-Upsp. 30
Homework, Quizzes, and Testsp. 31
Exercise 3: Sorting Homeworkp. 32
Process for Sorting the Homework Samplesp. 32
Commentary on Exercise 3p. 33
Making Videos of Your Ownp. 35
Wrapping Upp. 37
Additional Exercises: Video Clips of Two Math Interviewsp. 37
Exercise 4: Kasagep. 37
Process for Viewing and Analyzing the Kasage Videop. 37
Exercise 5: Myrnap. 43
Process for Viewing and Analyzing the Myrna Videop. 43
Seeing the Potential in Students' Thinkingp. 48
Why Focus on Errors?p. 49
Using Errors to See Potential Instead of Just Deficits in Students' Thinkingp. 49
Exercise 1: Lemonade Lesson Part 1-Alberto and Kishap. 51
Process for Viewing and Analyzing Lemonade Lesson Part 1p. 52
Commentary on Lemonade Lesson Part 1p. 55
Reflecting on Exercise 1p. 56
Exercise 2: Lemonade Lesson Part 2-Rosa and Mariap. 56
Process for Viewing and Analyzing Lemonade Lesson Part 2p. 57
Commentary on Lemonade Lesson Part 2p. 58
Reflecting on Exercise 2p. 59
General Commentary About Errorsp. 59
Working with Errors in Your Own Practicep. 60
Homeworkp. 60
Warm-Upsp. 61
Class Discussionsp. 61
Periodic Diagnostic Interviewsp. 61
Wrapping Upp. 62
Attention to Contentp. 63
Keeping an Eye on Rigorous Mathematics: Big Ideas and Habits of Mindp. 64
Naming and Framing Mathematical Rigorp. 65
Mathematical Frameworks: Big Ideas and Habits of Mindp. 66
Big Ideasp. 67
Habits of Mindp. 69
Choosing and Using a Mathematical Framework for Analyzing Artifactsp. 71
Exercise 1: Identifying Big Ideas in Your Math Textbookp. 71
Process for Analyzing Your Textbookp. 72
Commentary on Exercise 1p. 74
Exercise 2: A Tale of Two Lessons-Using Mathematical Frameworks to Think About Rigor and Cognitive Demandp. 76
Process for Analyzing the Lessonsp. 77
Commentary on Exercise 2p. 80
General Commentary on Using Mathematical Frameworks to Consider Mathematical Rigorp. 82
Using Mathematical Frameworks in Your Lessonsp. 83
Lesson Planningp. 83
Teaching the Lessonp. 84
Wrapping Upp. 84
Choosing, Using, and Connecting Mathematical Representationsp. 85
General Commentary About Representationsp. 88
Exercisesp. 89
Exercise 1: Larry's Seventh-Grade Classroom Scenariop. 90
Process for Analyzing Larry's Classroom Scenariop. 92
Commentary on Larry's Classroom Scenariop. 93
Reflecting on Exercise 1: Implications for Practicep. 100
Your Own Practice and Work with Representationsp. 101
Using Artifacts to Examine Representations in Your Classroomp. 101
Homeworkp. 101
Warm-Upsp. 101
Class Discussionp. 102
Diagnostic Interviewsp. 102
Wrapping Upp. 102
Additional Exercisesp. 102
Exercise 2: Video Games Fraction Lessonp. 103
Process for Analyzing the Video Game Fractions Lesson Videop. 103
Exercise 3: Garden Border Task: Student Methodsp. 107
Process for Analyzing the Garden Border Work Samplesp. 107
Putting It All Together in the Classroomp. 113
Putting It All Togetherp. 114
Exercises: Integrated Analysis of Whole Lessonsp. 115
Exercise 1: Building Triangles Lessonp. 117
Process for Viewing and Analyzing the Building Triangles Lessonp. 117
Commentary on the Building Traiangles Lessonp. 122
Some Additional Points of Reflectionp. 123
Exercise 2: Multiplication Lessonp. 124
Process for Viewing and Analyzing the Multiplication Lessonp. 124
Commentary on the Multiplication Lessonp. 130
Some Additional Points of Reflectionp. 132
Linking to Your Own Practicep. 132
Final Thoughtsp. 134
Appendixp. 135
Blank Worksheet (Chapter 2)p. 136
Student Work Samplesp. 137
Blank Worksheets (Chapters 3-6)p. 144
Lesson Graphs (Chapter 6)p. 149
Blank Lesson Graph (Chapter 6)p. 151
Referencesp. 152
Book Study Guidep. 156
Deciding on a Facilitatorp. 156
Structuring Your Book Study Sessionsp. 157
Using the Reading Reaction Sheetp. 157
Chapter Guiding Questionsp. 157
Combination of Structure 1 and 2p. 158
Guiding Questions for Each Chapterp. 158
Turning to the Evidencep. 158
Describing and Interpreting Classroom Artifactsp. 158
Seeing the Potential in Student Thinkingp. 159
Keeping an Eye on Rigorous Mathematicsp. 160
Choosing, Using, and Connecting Representationsp. 161
Putting It All Togetherp. 161
Reading Reaction Sheetp. 162
Indexp. 163
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem